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Hele-On Bus  
Service Animal Information 
 
Service animals perform tasks that remove barriers people with disabilities experience in 
the community.  Service animals are individually trained to assist persons with disabilities.  
For example, guide dogs assist people who are blind navigate streets safely and avoid 
walking into obstacles.  Some service dogs assist persons who use wheelchairs by 
fetching things for them, opening and closing doors, turning lights on and off.     
 
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) allows Hele-On operators to ask this question: 
 
?What is your service animal trained to do?? 
 
You should be prepared to answer this question when you want to ride the Hele-On bus 
with your service animal.  If you do answer the question, and your answer satisfies our 
operator, your animal will be considered a service animal.  Your service animal will be 
allowed entry to the bus.   
 
If you refuse to answer the question, or if our operator determines that the animal does 
not perform a task for you, your animal will be considered a pet.  In addition, emotional 
support animals, comfort animals and therapy animals are not considered service 
animals under the ADA.  In such cases, the rules for transport of pets on Hele-On buses 
apply: 
 
 
Pets are allowed provided they are kept in an enclosed container or cage. 
 
The Hele-On bus welcomes service animals that are under the care and control of their 
handlers at all times.  Regardless of the tasks they perform for individuals with disabilities, 
any animals that bark incessantly, sniff passengers, roam around the bus, urinate, 
defecate, growl, nip, bite or jump on passengers are not under the control of their 
handlers and may pose a threat to others.  In such cases, the Hele-On bus operator will 
tell the handler that the animal must leave the bus.  This will be documented and 
reported to head office.  
 
Our operators will not violate the ADA by asking to see certification or any other 
documentation to confirm that an animal is a service animal.  The fact that an animal 
wears a vest is irrelevant and does not prove that it is a service animal. 
 
Service animals in training are not considered service animals under the ADA.  The Hele-
On rules for pets apply to service animals in training.   
 
For more information about service animals visit the Americans with Disabilities web 
page at 
www.ADA.gov
.  You may telephone the ADA Information Line, 1-800-514-0301, 
or go to the FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) page of 
www.projectaction.easterseals.com
 and click on service animals. 
 
Aloha and have a good ride!