background image
C
OUNTY
 
OF
 H
AWAII
 
M
ASS
 T
RANSIT
 A
GENCY
B
US
 S
TOP
 L
OCATION
 S
TUDY
R
ECOMMENDATION
 R
EPORT
Prepared by:
SSFM International, Inc.
501 Sumner Street, Suite 620
Honolulu, HI 96817
Prepared for:
County of Hawaii
Mass Transit Agency
630 E. Lanikaula Street
Hilo, HI 96720
June 2010
background image
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Introduction 
 
  
 
 
 
County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
Bus Stop Location Project  
Recommendations Report 
 
Introduction 
 
The County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency (MTA) currently operates on a flagstop basis. With 
increased ridership, MTA is moving into a designated bus stop program. SSFM International, 
Inc. (SSFM) was contracted to identify locations for bus stops islandwide and to determine if 
locations warrant an official bus stop listed in the Hawaii County Code. Official bus stops will 
need to be Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant.  
 
This document is the third report in a three part series outlining improvement 
recommendations for the existing transit system. The first report, ?Inventory and Initial 
Screening Report,? was previously delivered which consisted of a complete inventory of 575 
existing bus stops islandwide. The second, ?Data Base of Priority Stops,? takes into 
consideration a variety of determining factors and identifies a list of 224 bus stop locations 
recommended for improvements.  
 
This report contains recommendations for 89 stops which should be made official in the Hawaii 
County Code. The report is organized into six sections: 
 
1.0 Recommendations for Official Bus Stops - Official bus stops are ones that 
need to be approved and cited in the Hawaii County Code. This is necessary 
primarily in cases where a ?No Parking Zone? needs to be established to 
make room for bus stops. 
 
2.0 Recommendations for ADA Compliance - In order for a bus stop to become 
an official Hawaii County Code listed stop, it must first comply with The 
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). ADA primarily serves as a standard of 
design guidelines to ensure that those with disabilities have access to the 
same public amenities as those of other riders. This section describes what 
needs to be done to bring each official stop into compliance. 
 
3.0 Recommendations for Bus Pullouts 
- Bus Pullouts are recommended for 
stops where safety and traffic conditions and space allow for a dedicated 
space for buses to pull completely off the road.  
 
4.0 Amenities  
? This section outlines amenities and improvement 
recommendations for all 224 priority stops. 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Introduction 
 
  
 
 
 
5.0 Stop  Placement  ? Bus stops are either located at the nearside, farside, or 
midblock of an intersection. This section describes the advantages and 
disadvantages of each. 
 
6.0 Report Summary 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Official Bus Stops 
 
  
 
 
 
Section 1.0 Criteria for Establishing Official Bus Stops 
 
Of the 224 priority stops, 89 are recommended for inclusion in the Hawaii County Code. The 
sites identified are in urban areas (Hilo and Kona), or where there is an anticipated need for 
enforcing a ?No Parking Zone? at the bus stop location. Table 1 is a description of these stops. 
It should be noted that for the purposes of evaluating the need for a bus stop into the Hawaii 
County Code it was assumed that major State Highways (Hwy) such as Hwy 11 and Hwy 19 were 
considered ?No Parking Zones.?  
 
The names of these new official stops would be added, by ordinance to Hawaii County Code 
Section 24-275, Schedule 23 Bus Stop Locations. For more information on bus stop guidelines, 
see Attachment 1.  
 
Table 1: Recommended List of Official Bus Stops 
 
 
Stop #  Name 
Description 
0111 
Mt View Aloha Gas 
South 
(if a feasible location) Hwy 11, length of lava rock wall in 
front of Mt. View Aloha Gas Station 
0115 
Kilauea General Store  
South  
Old Volcano Road from the north edge of Kilauea 
General Store Property to a point 100 feet south 
0119 
Pahoa Cash & Carry 
Pahoa Village Road, from a point beginning at the 
northern driveway entrance to Pahoa Cash and Carry, 
extending to a point 80 feet south-west 
0120 
Pahoa High & Inter 
South 
Pahoa Village Road, beginning at a point 60 feet south of 
Pahoa Village Road extending to a point 100 feet south 
0121 
Pahoa High & Inter 
North 
Pahoa Village Road, Length of Lava rock wall fronting 
entire property directly across from Pahoa High & 
Intermediate School 
0200 
Mooheau Bus Terminal 
(MBT) 
Already in code 
0210 
Bayfront Park and Ride 
East 
Kamehameha Avenue, both sides, at a point 50 feet east 
of the crosswalk in front of the bayfront soccer fields, 
extending to a point 100 feet east 
0211 
Bayfront Park and Ride 
West 
Same as 0210 
0212 
Aupuni Street 
Already designated but not in code 
10 
0213 
Aupuni Street 
Already designated but not in code 
11 
0217 
Hilo Medical Center 
Waianuenue Road, fronting Hilo Medical Center from 
crosswalk west to driveway entrance 
12 
 
0218 
 
Prince Kuhio West 
 
East Makaala Street, north side, from to intersection of 
Hwy 11, east to the first driveway entrance 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Official Bus Stops 
 
  
 
 
 
 
Stop #  Name 
Description 
13 
0219 
Prince Kuhio East 
East Makaala Street, south side. From the driveway 
entrance nearest to Hwy 11 extending west 100 feet 
14 
0221 
Kulaimano Elderly 
Housing  
Kumula Street, beginning from the southern driveway 
entrance to Elderly Housing to a point 100 feet north 
15 
0230 Ululani 
South 
Lanakaula Street, both sides, beginning from the 
intersection of Ululani Street to a point 100 feet east 
16 
0231 
Ululani North 
Same as 0231 
17 
0238 
Waiakea High School 
Kawili  
Kawili Street, beginning at a point 100 feet from the 
north-east property line of Waiakea High School 
extending to a point 100 feet south-west 
18 
0240 
HCC East 
Already in code 
19 
0241 
HCC West  
(Recommend moving 
existing Community 
College bus stop) 
Kawili Street, beginning at the intersection with Mililani 
Street, extending to a point 100 feet south-west 
20 
0242 
Bank of Hawaii West 
Kawili Street, near intersection with Hawaii Belt Road  
50 feet fronting Automotive Supply Center 
21 
0243 
Bank of Hawaii East 
Kawili Street south side, beginning at the intersection of 
Wiwoole Street, extending a distance of 40 feet 
22 
0244 
Banyan Resorts Stop 1 
Already in code 
23 
0245 
Banyan Resorts Stop 2 
Already in code 
24 
0246 
Banyan Resorts Stop 3 
Banyan Drive, makai side, beginning at a point 30 feet 
from the pedestrian entrance to Liliuokalani Park 
extending to a point 100 feet east 
25 
0247 
Banyan Resorts Stop 4 
Banyan Drive, mauka side, beginning at the intersection 
with Lihiwai Street, extending east 100 feet 
26 
0248 
Leleiwi Beack Park 
Kalanianaole Avenue, makai side, beginning from the 
east driveway entrance to Liliuokalani Park extending to 
a point 100 feet east 
27 
0250 
Keaukaha Beach Park 
Kalanianaole Avenue, makai side, beginning at a point 
20 feet east of the driveway entrance to Keaukaha 
Beach Park, extending to a point 100 feet east 
28 
0252 Ponds 
West 
Kalanianaole Avenue, mauka side, 100 feet between first 
two utility poles east of intersection with Banyan Way 
29 
0254 
St. Joseph School West 
Hualalai Street, north side, from the intersection of 
Ululani Street extending 80 feet south-west 
30 
 
 
0255 
 
 
Ka Waena Lapaau 
 
 
Komohana Street, east side, from the southern driveway 
entrance to Ka Waena Lapaau Medical Facility, 
extending to a point 100 feet south 
 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Official Bus Stops 
 
  
 
 
 
 
Stop #  Name 
Description 
31 
0256 
Hilo High School  
(adjust existing stop) 
Waianuenue Avenue, both sides, from a point beginning 
at the signalized entrance of Hilo Intermediate School 
extending to a point 100 feet north-east 
32 
0257 
Hilo Intermediate 
School 
Same as 0257 
33 
0258 
Hilo Library West 
Already in code 
34 
0260 
Kalakaua Park East 
Already in code 
35 
0261 
Kalakaua Park West 
Waianuenue Avenue, beginning from intersection with 
Kinoole Street, extending to a point 80 feet north-east 
36 
0270 Hihio 
Kaumana Drive, beginning from the intersection with 
Private Road, just west of Terrace Drive, extending to a 
point 80 feet west 
37 
0271 Ainako 
West 
The whole property frontage is driveway entrance. 
Placement not specified. Need to measure after 
construction. 
38 
0275 
Gilbert Carvalho Park 
West 
Waianuenue Avenue, beginning at the driveway 
entrance to Gilbert Carvalho Park, extending to a point 
100 feet east 
39 
0277 KTA 
West 
Puainako Street, beginning at a point 40 feet from the 
driveway entrance to Ginger Patch Market and Deli, to a 
point 100 feet east 
40 
0278 KTA 
East 
Puainako Street, 90 feet between driveway entrance to 
Hawaii Mamaki Tea Plantation and west entrance to KTA 
Shopping Center 
41 
0282 
Hilo Public Golf Course 
Haihai Street, north side, beginning at a point 62 feet 
west of eastern entrance to Hilo Municipal Golf Course, 
extending to a point 100 feet west 
42 
0283 Kapaka 
Haihai Street, north side, 60 feet between driveways 
fronting 660 Haihai Street 
43 
0284 Ainaola 
Haihai Steet, north side, fronting 868 Haihai Street 
beginning from the driveway at east end of property, 
extending to a point 80 feet west 
44 
0288 
Life Care Center 
Kawailani  Avenue, directly across from the driveway 
entrance to the Hilo Life Care Center, 50 feet in either 
direction 
45 
 
0401 
 
Honokaa Hospital 
North 
Not a preferred alternative, but recommended for 
Community College if selected 
46 
 
0403 
 
Honokaa Park  
(preferred Alternative) 
 
Lehua Street, beginning from the driveway to the rear 
entrance of Honokaa Hospital extending to a point 80 
feet south 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Official Bus Stops 
 
  
 
 
 
 
Stop #  Name 
Description 
47 
0404 
Blane?s Drive-In East 
Mamane Street, beginning at the front steps of United 
Methodist Church extending 40 feet in either direction 
48 
0405 
Blane?s Drive-In West 
Multiple alternatives. Needs to be incorporated into the 
Hawaii County Code once selected. 
49 
0406 Honokaa 
HS 
East 
Mamane Street, south side, starting from the 
intersection with Pakalana Street extending west 100 
feet 
50 
0407 Honokaa 
HS 
West 
Mamane Street, north side, beginning from the 
driveway entrance of the Waimea Medical Association, 
extending to a point 80 feet west 
51 
0502 Junction 
250 
West 
Hwy 270, north side, beginning at a point 100 feet  east 
of intersection with Hwy 250, extending to a point 100 
feet  east 
52 
0503 
Kohala Town Center 
East 
Mahukona-Hawi Road, south side, the 90 feet between 
driveways fronting Kohala Town Center 
53 
0504 
Kohala Town Center 
West 
Mahukona-Hawi Road, north side, beginning at a point 
90 feet from the intersection with Hospital Road, 
extending to a point 100 feet west 
54 
0505 Ainakea 
North 
Ainakea Drive, west side, beginning from the 
intersection of Kolonahe Street extending to a point 100 
feet north 
55 
0506 Ainakea 
South 
Ainakea Drive, east side, beginning from a point 50 feet 
north of the driveway entrance of existing Ainakea 
Senior Residence extending to a point 100 feet north 
56 
0610 
Waimea Elementary 
East 
Hwy 19, from the front steps of Waimea Elementary 
school extending to a point 100 feet west 
57 
0619 
HPA Village East 
Hwy 19, from the east property line of address 65-2171 
extending to a point 100 feet west 
58 
0620 
HPA Village West 
Hwy 19, from a point 25 feet west of the driveway 
entrance to HPA Village Campus to a point 100 feet west 
59 
0623 
HPA Main Campus East 
Hwy 19, at junction 250, description needs to be written 
once a final location is chosen 
60 
0624 
HPA Main Campus 
West 
Hwy 19, at junction 250, description needs to be written 
once a final location is chosen 
61 
0701 Kona 
Airport 
Kona Airport, from the crosswalk fronting Ellison S. 
Onizuka Space Center to a point 100 feet north 
62 
0702 
Kuakini & Palani West 
Not currently on scheduled route, incorporate stop as 
system expands 
63 
 
0703 
 
Kuakini & Palani East 
 
Not currently on scheduled route, incorporate stop as 
system expands 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Official Bus Stops 
 
  
 
 
 
 
Stop #  Name 
Description 
64 
0704 
Kona Seaside Shopping 
Mall 
Alii Drive, from the south east driveway entrance to the 
Kona Seaside Shopping Mall to a point 80 feet north 
65 
0705 
King Kamehameha 
Kona Beach 
Alii Drive from the intersection of Kaahumanu Place to a 
point 100 feet north  
66 
0706 
Kona Bay (Lakina N) 
Alii Drive, existing loading zone fronting Koa Reality  
67 
0707 
Kona Bay (Lakina S) 
Alii Drive, makai side, from the crosswalk at the 
intersection with Lakana Drive to a point 100 feet north 
68 
0708 
Uncle Billy's South 
Alii Drive, both sides, from the crosswalk at the 
intersection with Hualalai Road to a point 100 feet north 
69 
0709 
Uncle Billy's North 
Same as 0708 
70 
0710 
Kona Target North 
Makala Boulevard, east side, from the crosswalk at the 
entrance to the Target Store to a point 100 feet north 
71 
0711 
Kona Target South 
Makala Boulevard, west side, from the crosswalk across 
from the entrance to the Target Store to a point 100 
feet south 
72 
0732 
Coconut Grove Market 
Alii Drive 70 foot designated pull out area approximately 
200 feet north of Kahakai Road  
73 
0733 Kaiwi 
St 
Not currently on scheduled route, incorporate stop as 
system expands 
74 
0734 Kekuaokalani 
Gym 
Not currently on scheduled route, incorporate stop as 
system expands 
75 
0735 
Lanihau Center South 
Palani Road, west side, beginning at a point 15 feet 
south of the entrance to Palani Shopping Center, 
extending to a point 100 feet south 
76 
0736 
Lanihau Center North 
Palani Road, east side, beginning at the entrance to 
Palani Shopping Center, extending to a point 100 feet 
north 
77 
0742 
Kainaliu Kona South 
Hwy 11, 75 feet of existing loading zone, fronting 
Oshima?s Drugstore (address: 17-7400) 
78 
0743 
Kainaliu Kona North 
Hwy 11, from the driveway entrance on north side of 
building at address 79-7407, to a point 80 feet south 
79 
0801 
Hookena Elementary 
North 
Hwy 11, east side, across from Hookena Elementary, 100 
foot paved pull off area 
80 
0802 
Hookena Elementary 
South 
Hwy 11, West side, beginning at a the crosswalk in front 
of Hookena Elementary extending to a point 75 feet 
north 
81 
0806 
Honaunau Post Office 
Need a Hawaii County Code description if stop is placed 
at this location 
82 
 
0807 
 
Keoki?s  
 
Hwy 11, makai side, beginning from utility pole 116000 
at Spirit Gas Station continuing to a 60 feet north 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Official Bus Stops 
 
  
 
 
 
 
Stop #  Name 
Description 
83 
0808 
Honaunau Elementary 
Hwy 11, 100 feet fronting Honaunau Elementary 
84  0809 
Yano Hall North 
Already in code 
85  0810 
Yano Hall South 
Hwy 11, beginning at a point 60 feet north of Kinue Road 
intersection, to a point 80 feet north 
86  0902 
Pahala Town Center 
On Pikake Street 
87  0904 
Naalehu School South 
Hwy 11 
88 0906 
Naalehu Civic Center 
East 
Hwy 11, from a point 60 feet north of the utility pole at 
the south end of the Naalehu theatre property to a 
point 100 feet north 
89 0907 
Naalehu Civic Center 
West 
Hwy 11, from mile marker 46 to a point 100 feet south 
 
NOTE: The descriptions included as part of Table 1 are draft. Measurements and locations should be 
verified before adoption into the Hawaii County Code. 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
ADA Compliance  
 
  
 
 
 
Section 2.0 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Compliance for Bus Stops 
 
Compliance with Federal Law requires that official bus stops be ADA compliant: 
 
Bus Stop Pad   
Open surface with 8 x 5 foot firm, flat, slip resistant surface, accessible by 3 foot wide path. 
Ideally, high-volume stops should have clear pedestrian access from both bus doors, if 
applicable. 
 
Sidewalks 
 
36 inch wide, clear, stable, firm, and slip-resistant surface that is graded for proper run off 
control is required for pedestrian access to a bus stop. If a region is lacking in pedestrian 
amenities, the transit association, in conjunction with local municipalities or developers, must 
provide a pedestrian path to the nearest intersection. 
 
Curb Cuts 
 
Although the pedestrian access for the majority of Hawaii County is at grade, curb cuts are 
required at intersections with curbing or any abrupt change in grade. 
 
ADA issues for non-essential amenities:  
 
Route Signs
 
 
If a pictogram is used, it must be accompanied by raised characters and Braille. Signs need to be 
mounted with a centerline 60 inches from ground. It is recommended that every stop with a 
sign have an updatable schedule for each unique stop. 
 
Shelters  
 
36 inch wide clear, stable, firm, and slip-resistant surface 
30 x 48 inch of clear floor space is required for enclosed shelters 
 
ADA Recommended Stops  
Table 2 on the next page describes recommended ADA compliance for the Hawaii County Code 
recommended sites not currently in compliance.  
 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
ADA Compliance  
 
  
 
10 
 
 
Table 2: Recommended ADA features at Stops 
 
 
Stop # 
Name 
Bus Stop Pad 
Sidewalk 
Curb Cut 
0121 
Pahoa High and Inter North 
0217 
Hilo Medical Center 
0221 
Kulaimano Elderly Housing 
 
 
4 0240 
HCC 
East 
5 0241 
HCC 
West 
0242 
Bank of Hawaii West 
 
 
0247 
Banyan Resorts Stop 4 
0248 
Leleiwi Beach Park 
 
 
0250 
Keaukaha Beach Park 
 
 
 
10 0252 Ponds 
West 
 
 
11 
0255 
Ka Waena Lapaau 
 
 
12 0270 Hihio 
 
 
 
13 0283 Kapaka 
 
 
14 0284 Ainaola 
 
 
15 
0288 
Life Care Center 
 
 
16 0401 Honokaa 
Hospital 
North 
 
17 0403 Honokaa 
Park 
 
18 
0405 
Blane?s Drive-In West 
19 0502 Junction 
250 
West 
 
 
20 
0503 
Kohala Town Center East 
 
 
21 
0504 
Kohala Town Center West 
 
 
22 0505 Ainakea 
North 
 
 
23 0506 Ainakea 
South 
 
 
24 0701 Kona 
Airport 
 
 
25 
0702 
Kaukini & Palani West 
 
 
26 
0703 
Kaukini & Palani East 
 
 
27 
0704 
Kona Seaside Shopping Mall 
 
 
28 
0705 
King Kamehameha Kona Beach  
 
 
29 
0732 
Coconut Grove Market  
 
 
30 0734 Kekuaokalani 
Gym 
31 
0735 
Lanihau Center South 
 
 
32 
0736 
Lanihau Center North 
 
 
33 0808 Honaunau 
Elementary 
 
 
 
 
NOTE: Amenities addressed as part of pull-out design are covered in Section 3 of this document.
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Bus Pullouts 
 
  
 
11 
 
 
Section 3.0 Criteria for Bus Pullouts 
 
This section describes the bus stop sites which would benefit from bus pullouts as a means to 
mitigate safety issues. There are 14 such stops (see Table 3) within Hawaii County; all of which 
are recommended for incorporation into the Hawaii County Code discussed in Chapter 2.  
 
Generally bus pullouts are reserved for 3 scenarios: 
 
?
 
Speed zones greater than 45 mph 
?
 
Where more than 35 people use the bus in a single day 
?
 
Where there is a significant safety concern 
 
Table 3: Recommended Sites for Bus Pullouts 
 
 
Stop # 
Name 
Rational
1 0110 
Mt View Aloha Gas Station North (2 
directional pullout alternative) 
Ideal location. Will eliminate need for second stop 
and highway crossing 
2 0115 
Kilauea General Store South 
(2 directional pullout alternative) 
Open area, good conditions, eliminates the need 
for a second stop across the street that may have 
narrow right-of-way 
0120 
Pahoa High and Inter South 
Plenty of room on either side of the street. Safer for 
students 
0121 
Pahoa High and Inter North
5 0217 Hilo 
Medical 
Center 
Anticipated that hospital stop will require longer 
stopping time and adequate space is available. 
6 0278 KTA 
East 
Stop has a 16 foot shoulder, plenty of space for 
pullout 
0619 
HPA Village East 
School stop with adequate shoulder width  
0620 
HPA Village West 
0623 
HPA Main Campus East 
Stop for school children located on dangerous 
highway curve. 
10 
0624 
HPA Main Campus West
11 
0801 
Hookena Elementary North
School stop with adequate shoulder width  
 
12 
0802 
Hookena Elementary South
13 0806 
Honaunau Post Office (location 
requires further evaluation) 
Recommended the counter purchase property and 
turn it into a ?drop-off? or ?park-n-ride? location 
14 0808 Honaunau 
Elementary 
Good conditions for pullout area, creates safer stop 
for school children. 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Bus Stop Amenities  
 
  
 
12 
 
 
Section 4.0 Bus Stop Amenities 
 
During the second phase of field work, each priority location was evaluated for eight different 
amenities. Once existing conditions were recorded, recommendations were made for necessary 
improvements, taking into consideration the surround area and anticipated usage at each 
location. These are shown in the ?Data Base of Priority Stops,? a companion report to this 
document. 
 
Signage 
Clearly visible signage is the most basic necessity of any bus stop, and is recommended at every 
proposed bus stop location.  Limited signage exists within the current system. The majority of 
the existing signs were found in the District of South Hilo. It is recommended that even the 
existing signs be updated with larger signs having clear and simple graphics. It is also 
recommended that each sign have a simple and updatable schedule giving precise time of 
buses stopping at each location. 
 
Informational Display 
Although Information regarding Hawaii County Mass Transit Agency operations is becoming 
more easily accessible through the internet and expanding transit operations, it is still 
recommended to provide informational kiosks at high-volume and tourist stops islandwide.  
 
Benches 
A bench for waiting passengers is recommended at every stop where it is physically possible. 
Benches should be placed at least six feet from the traffic lane of the adjacent street. 
 
Bus Pad 
Bus Pads are reinforced concrete pads used to handle the additional load, along with the wear 
and tear of paved surfaces created by buses at bus stop locations, most often in conjunction 
with bus pullouts. Bus Pads can be incorporated when streets are resurfaced. 
 
Lighting 
Lighting plays a role in a bus stop?s perceived safety. Every effort has been taken to make use of 
existing street lighting to fulfill this need. Where additional lighting is necessary or passenger 
safety is of concern, lighting fixtures can be incorporated into the proposed bus stop design. 
Solar powered lighting is recommended to eliminate the need for utility connectivity and make 
use of an easily available renewable energy source.  
 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Bus Stop Amenities  
 
  
 
13 
 
 
 
Shelters 
Shelters are desirable features. Priority should be given to stops with more than 25 riders a day, 
where a wheel chair lift is used frequently, and near senior housing centers. If funding is 
available, stops in new high volume activity centers and consolidated stops should have 
shelters. 
 
General provisions when considering shelter construction include:  
?
 
Maintain five feet of unobstructed pedestrian pathway,  
?
 
Shelters generally require a 9 to 11 foot setback from the curb, and  
?
 
In instances of limited space, a shelter can be constructed up to 25 feet from the 
bus stop location. 
 
?Adopt-a-Stop? is a program used in other cities that could be instituted in Hawaii County. 
Adopt-a-Stop should be sought where the opportunity is present for MTA to work with business 
owners who can assume the responsibility for cost and maintenance of a bus stop.  
 
The final design of the bus stop shelter should also respond to the environmental demands of 
the site, such as sun, wind, and precipitation. Panel placement, shelter orientation, and 
materials types that are easily maintained and provide maximum comfort to riders should be 
selected. Also, enclosed shelters should be constructed of materials that allow clear 
unobstructed visibility of patrons waiting inside, and vice versa. 
 
Refuse 
Although waste receptacles are necessary to reduce littering, removal services is a very costly 
endeavor on the part of the MTA. This amenity is recommended primarily at Adopt-a-Stops 
where a trash can is primarily a service to the adjacent business owners. 
 
Other popular programs exist such as ?Keep-a-Can? in Portland, OR. Individuals are able to take 
ownership of their local transit system by volunteering to empty and service a trash can in their 
neighborhood. In return the transit association would provide an attractive, industrial strength 
can, liner, and recycling container. 
 
Crosswalks 
Crosswalks are a very important feature for pedestrian access to and from a bus stop. In the 
field study existing crosswalks were noted, and although not necessarily a part of this study, 
observations were noted in regions where an additional crosswalk was a logical safety or 
convenience improvement. As a general provision, bus stops should be located 15 feet from 
crosswalks when possible. In all cases, a crosswalk should be available where a set of stops 
serves locations on different sides of the street. 
A breakdown of the advantages and 
disadvantages of each amenity can be found in Attachments 2 and 3. 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Bus Stop Amenities  
 
  
 
14 
 
 
Security 
Security, which is as much a perceptual issue as it is a physical one, plays a significant role on 
the comfort of riders. Graffiti and trash should be regularly removed. Direct surveillance from 
adjacent land users and traffic should be sought where ever possible. When landscaping, use 
low growing shrubs. Finally, avoid locations where there is an opportunity for concealment.  
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Stop Placement 
 
  
 
15 
 
 
Section 5.0 Stop Placement 
 
Bus stops placement locations are chosen based on multiple of factors. Safety, for both 
passengers and vehicles, is the number one consideration. Stop locations should be easily 
accessible by surrounding neighborhoods and transit generators. Also, placement is chosen by 
locations where improvements in safety, convenience, and/or reduced trip time.  
 
Ideally, stops are placed at intersections for a number of reasons: 
 
?
 
To reduce walking time 
?
 
Intersection crossings are generally safer 
?
 
To be closer to ADA amenities like curb ramps, which generally only appear at 
intersections.  
 
When bus stops are placed they should be evaluated based on their relationship to the nearest 
intersection, being categorized as nearside, farside, or midblock, in proximity. Each location 
type has its own advantages and disadvantages. Table 4 outlines the main characteristics from 
each.  
 
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Stop Placement 
 
  
 
16 
 
 
Table 4: Farside, Nearside, & Midblock Locations 
 
Source: TCRP Report 19 - Chapter 3 
 
Farside placement is generally the preferred alternative. They tend to cause fewer traffic delays 
and are safer, by blocking fewer traffic movements and sight lines. Farside placement also 
eliminates the danger of other drivers making illegal right turns in front of the bus, and allows 
for shorter pullout distance by using the intersection as part of the approach.  
 
 
 
 
Advantages 
Disadvantages 
Farside 
 
Minimize conflict between right turning vehicles 
and buses 
 
Provides additional right turning capacity by 
making curb lane available for traffic 
 
Minimizes sight distance problems on 
approaches to intersections. 
 
Encourages pedestrians to cross behind the bus. 
 
Creates shorter deceleration distances for buses 
since the bus can use the intersection to 
decelerate. 
 
Results in bus drivers being able to take 
advantage of the gaps in traffic flow that are 
created at signalized intersections. 
 
May result in the intersections being 
blocked during peak periods by stopping 
buses. 
 
May obscure sight distance for crossing 
vehicles 
 
May increase sight distance problems for 
crossing pedestrians 
 
Can cause a bus to stop farside after 
stopping for a red light  
 
Could result in traffic queued into 
intersection when a bus is stopped in 
travel lane 
Nearside 
 
Minimize interference when traffic is heavy on 
the farside of the intersection 
 
Allows passengers to access buses closest to 
crosswalk 
 
Results in the width of the intersection being 
available for the driver to pull away from the 
curb 
 
Eliminates the potential for double stopping 
 
Allows passengers to board and alight while the 
bus is stopped at a red light 
 
Provides driver with the opportunity for driver to 
look for oncoming traffic, including other buses 
with potential passengers
 
 
Increases conflict with right turning 
vehicles 
 
May result in stopped buses obscuring 
curbside traffic control devices and 
crossing pedestrians 
 
May cause sight distance to be obscured 
for cross vehicles stopped to the right of 
bus 
 
May block the through lane during peak 
period with queuing buses 
 
Increases sight distance problems for 
crossing pedestrians 
Midblock 
 
Minimizes sight distance problems for vehicles 
and pedestrians 
 
May result in passenger waiting areas 
experiencing less pedestrian congestion 
 
Requires additional distance for no-
parking restrictions 
 
Encourage patrons to cross street at 
midblock (jaywalking) 
 
Increases walking distance for patrons 
crossing at intersections
 
background image
 
Bus Stop Location Project for County of Hawaii Mass Transit Agency 
 
 
Final Report   
Summary 
 
  
 
17 
 
 
Section 6 Summary 
 
In this multi-step study, SSFM has examined every bus route and every stop. Using field 
examinations, we have recommended 224 priority stops. Of these, 89 stops should be included 
in the Hawaii County Code and made ADA compliant. Table 5 summarizes bus stop numbers 
determined for Hawaii County. 
 
Table 5: Summary of Bus Stops in Hawaii County 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Attached as part of this document are: 
?
 
Bus Stop Guidelines 2002, Tri-Met - Chapter 3, The Bus Stop  
?
 
TCRP Report 19 - Chapter 3, Curb-Side Factors 
?
 
TCRP Report 19 - Chapter 4, Street-Side Factors 
 
 
 
 
 
Final Statistics ? Islandwide 
Existing Stops Identified 
575 
Stops Field Surveyed 
253 
Priority Stops 
224 
Hawaii County Code Recommendations 
89 
County Code stops requiring ADA 
improvements 
38 
Bus Pullouts recommended 
14 
background image
 
 
 
 
 
 
ATTACHMENT 1 
 
Bus Stop Guidelines 2002 
Tri-Met - Chapter 3 
The Bus Stop 
 
 
background image
 
Bus Stops Guidelines 2002 
 
 
 
October 2002 
background image
 
Acknowledgements 
 
 
Bus Stop Guidelines Committee: 
 
Ben Baldwin, Planner, Bus Stops ? Project Oversight, Contributor 
Myleen Richardson, Planner/Analyst ? Editor, Contributor  
Angie Corbin, Maintenance Supervisor, FM ? Contributor, Document Review 
Phil Selinger, Director of Project Planning ? Contributor, Document Review 
Alan Lehto, Manager Corridor Planning? Contributor, Document Review 
Young Park, Manager of Capital Projects ? Contributor, Document Review 
Yalawnda Anderson, Engineer ? Contributor, Document Review 
Pete Taylor, Trainer ? Document Review 
Diana Anderson, Information Development Coordinator ? Document Review 
Elizabeth Davidson, Community Relations Specialist ? Document Review  
Warren Schlegel and Debbie Huntington, Graphics ? Final Document Format, Production 
 
 
 
Questions and comments pertaining to the contents of this report can be sent to: 
 
Young Park, Manager of Capital Projects 
parky@trimet.org 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Copyright 2002, TriMet 
 
All rights reserved.  No part of this work covered by the copyright thereon may be 
reproduced or used in any form or by any means ? graphic, electronic, or mechanical, 
including photocopying, recording, taping, or information storage or retrieval systems ? 
without permission of TriMet 
background image
Table of Contents 
 
Executive Summary ............................................................................................................ i 
 
I.    Introduction...................................................................................................................1 
   
II.   Bus Stops Program Year 2000 Status Report ...............................................................2 
A.  Bus Stop Statistics Snapshot..................................................................................2 
B.  Limitations.............................................................................................................3 
C.  Priorities.................................................................................................................3 
 
III.  The Bus Stop ................................................................................................................5 
 A.  Stop Location and Spacing ....................................................................................5 
 B.  Stop Placement.......................................................................................................9 
 C.  Stop Elements, Amenities, and Customer Information ........................................10 
 D.  Bus Stop Layouts and Design ..............................................................................17 
 E.  Roadway Treatments ............................................................................................21 
 F.  Bus Stop Access ...................................................................................................23 
 
IV.  Program Partnerships .................................................................................................24 
A.  Citizen Involvement ............................................................................................24 
B.  Development Review ..........................................................................................24 
C.  Public Partnerships ..............................................................................................25 
 
 V.   Bus Stop Development Projects ................................................................................26 
 
VI.  Maintenance Guidelines.............................................................................................29 
A.  Introduction .........................................................................................................29 
B.  Goal .....................................................................................................................29 
C.  Description of Tri-Met Maintained Amenities ....................................................29 
D.  Standards .............................................................................................................29 
E.  Routine Maintenance ...........................................................................................29 
F.  Emergency Cleaning ............................................................................................30 
G.  Waste Disposal ....................................................................................................30 
H.  Anti-Litter and Graffiti Programs........................................................................30 
I.  Bus Stop Amenities Replacement .......................................................................30 
 
VII.  Organizational Support .............................................................................................32 
A.  The Bus Stops Management Section...................................................................32 
B.  Interdepartmental Involvement............................................................................33 
C.  Bus Stops Section Development Process ............................................................34 
D.  Operations and Maintenance ...............................................................................35 
 
VIII.  Program Support (Funding).....................................................................................36 
 
 
Attachment A.  ...................................................................................................................... 
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
 
 
6/15/2006 
 
Page i 
Executive Summary 
 
 
The public's first impression of Tri-Met and its services is the bus stop.  It is important that bus stops are 
easily identifiable, safe, accessible, and a comfortable place to wait for the bus.  These guidelines provide 
a framework for maintaining and developing bus stops.  They promote consistency for good design and 
the provision of bus stop amenities, making stops easier to identify and better matched to their use, 
location and potential for attracting riders.  Through a series of development programs, Tri-Met seeks to 
make bus stops a positive contribution to the community streetscape and a place where riders can obtain 
transit related information and are encouraged to use the provided services.   
The guidelines identify and encourage partnerships with the community and property owners.  Tri-Met is 
working with communities to improve access to bus stops, including sidewalks, safe street crossings, 
accessible curb ramps and bicycle lanes.  The quality of the streetscape is critical to the success of the bus 
stop development program. 
  
The purpose of this document is to: 
1)  Identify the elements of the Tri-Met bus stop, 
2)  Set guidelines for the design of bus stops and the placement of bus stop amenities, and 
3)  Describe the process for managing and developing bus stops at Tri-Met. 
 
This document will also act as the basis for CIP development to justify and support project goals. 
 
 
The Bus Stops Guidelines document contains seven major sections, each of which is summarized below.  
Introduction: This section looks at the various goals that govern the development and 
implementation of bus stop projects within Tri-Met.  The section also provides a snapshot of the 
current on-street inventory throughout the system and looks at some of the challenges that Tri-
Met are being faced with.  The section concludes by identifying the short and long term goals of 
the Bus Stops Section.  
The Bus Stop: This section looks at the guidelines maintained by Tri-Met to maximize the 
effectiveness of its bus service.  This section defines preferred designs for bus stop location, 
layout, amenities and applying transit-preferential street treatments.   
Program Partnerships: Bus stops as public spaces are as much a part of a community as streets, 
pathways, parks and plazas.  This section explores ways in which Tri-Met encourages 
jurisdictions, neighborhood associations and citizens to recognize the value bus stops play in the 
community and looks for ways to build partnerships with these entities to enhance bus stops.  
Bus Stop Development Projects: Tri-Met initiates capital projects to make significant 
improvements to route efficiency, on-street and bus stop safety, accessibility and comfort. This 
section describes some projects Tri-Met is currently implementing, which provide and / or 
improve amenities within existing transit services. 
Maintenance Standards: This section discusses the maintenance standards Tri-Met utilizes to 
keep the service area safe and clean. 
Organizational Support: Primary responsibility and accountability for bus stops ? their design, 
placement, shelters and other amenities ? lies with the Capital Projects Management section of 
the Project Planning Department.  This nine person section works closely with other Tri-Met 
departments to provide for the regular maintenance and management of bus stops as well as 
implementation of bus stop development programs.  This section provides a brief description of 
the Section?s positions, responsibilities and the interdepartmental support needed to manage bus 
stops. 
Program Support: This section identifies ways to finance and maintain bus stop program 
initiatives that help offset program costs.   
 
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
 
Introduction 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 1 
Bus Stops Guidelines 2002 
 
I.  Introduction 
The public's first impression of TriMet and its services is the bus stop.  It is important that bus stops are 
easily identifiable, safe, accessible, and a comfortable place to wait for the bus.  These guidelines provide 
a framework for maintaining and developing bus stops.  They promote consistency for good design and 
the provision of bus stop amenities, making stops easier to identify and better matched to their use, 
location and potential for attracting riders.  Through a series of development programs, TriMet seeks to 
make bus stops a positive contribution to the community streetscape and a place where riders can obtain 
transit related information and are encouraged to use the provided services.  The guidelines identify and 
encourage partnerships with the community and property owners.  TriMet is working with communities 
to improve access to bus stops, including sidewalks, safe street crossings, accessible curb ramps and 
bicycle lanes.  The quality of the streetscape is critical to the success of the bus stop development 
program. 
 
The purpose of this document is threefold:  1) to identify the elements of the TriMet bus stop, 2) to set 
guidelines for the design of bus stops and the placement of bus stop amenities, and 3) to describe the 
process for managing and developing bus stops at TriMet.  Through explanations and diagrams, this 
document provides the tools needed to plan bus stops and associated amenities within the TriMet service 
area.  
Bus Stops Program Goals: 
?  A basic bus stop should consist of an accessible, paved area and easily identifiable signage.  Bus 
stop shelters and other amenities shall be provided consistent with a set of bus stop development 
criteria. 
?  Bus stops should be placed to assure customer convenience and provide for the safety of 
pedestrians and vehicles.  Stops shall be visible, near crosswalks and well lit. 
?  Bus stops should be clearly and consistently identifiable with up-to-date information for riders 
about services at the bus stop. 
?  TriMet should solicit community input for all bus stop installations and changes, and respond 
promptly to inquiries and complaints from customers and bus stop neighbors. 
?  The design of bus stops shall be sensitive to the community setting and may incorporate features 
that identify the stop with the community (such as art, bus stop naming or inclusion of a 
community bulletin board). 
?  Where reasonable, bus stops should be accessible.  Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 
considerations will be given top priority in the siting and design of new and existing bus stops. 
?  Bus stops shall be located in support of institutions and with clients having special needs, large 
employers and community centers. 
?  Bus stops will be spaced to maximize the efficient operation of transit service while not requiring 
riders to walk more than a quarter mile to the bus stop.  
?  TriMet will work with local jurisdictions, communities, and land developers to construct sidewalk 
connections to bus stops.  Regional planning targets, new or sustained transit service and bus stop 
investments will be used to encourage those improvements. 
?  Bus stops shall be well maintained and free of trash and vandalism.  TriMet will seek partnerships 
that share responsibility for maintaining bus stops. 
?  Damaged or worn out bus stop features shall be repaired or replaced in a timely manner. 
?  TriMet will seek to offset the cost of installing and maintaining bus stop amenities through a bus 
shelter and bus bench advertising program. 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
 
Bus Stop Statistics 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 2 
II.   Bus Stops Program Year 2001 Status Report 
 
A.  Bus Stop Statistics Snapshot 
 
General Information 
?  Service Area 
 
 
 
592 square miles 
?  Jurisdictions in the service area   
30 
?  Bus Stops 
 
 
 
8189 
Major transit points
1
 
 
>150 
 
Bus Stop Elements and Amenities 
Poles
2
 
 
 
 
 
8127 
 
Shelters 
 
 
 
 
888 
?  Ad shelters 
 
 
 
44 
 
Trash cans  
 
 
 
535 
 
Benches 
 
 
 
 
1786 
?  Basic (used in shelters)   
  
800 
?  Premium 
 
 
   
37 
?  Ad 
 
 
 
  
949 
 
Informational Displays 
 
 
277 
?  Bus Catcher Information Display 
229 
?  BCID Transit Tubes 
 
 
25 
?  BCID Small Pole Mounts 
 
23 
 
Lighting (stops with nearby lighting) 
58% 
 
Pavement
3
   
 
 
 
 
?  Curbcut near landing 
 
 
46% 
?  Sidewalk at stop 
 
 
70% 
?  Front landing paved 
 
 
64% 
?  Rear landing paved 
 
 
57% 
 
 
Data is current as of January 31, 2001. 
                                                            
1
 This includes major transit points, transit centers, and stops in the downtown bus mall. 
2
 Currently, TriMet uses square tube poles.  Previously, round, 2? poles were used.  Please note that some   
   jurisdictions also use these pole types. 
3
 There is not a total number presented, as stops can have any combination of the items listed.  For example, the  
   sidewalk may be the pavement for the front and back landings, and would be counted for each category. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
An example of how to interpret the pavement data would 
be:  46% of stops have a curbcut nearby. 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Limitations and Priorities 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 3 
B.  Limitations 
 
Not all TriMet bus stops are consistent with the goals listed in the preceding section.  In some 
instances bus stops are defined by the underdeveloped corridors or roads they serve.  Where roadways 
lack underground drainage and pedestrian systems or are constrained by natural terrain, TriMet cannot 
effectively improve impacted bus stops without making significant street and sidewalk enhancements, 
removing or reducing the number of stops or moving service.  These issues may be best addressed by a 
coordinated effort between TriMet and the jurisdictions charged with maintaining and upgrading the 
roadway system. 
  
?  Approximately 32% of TriMet bus stops suffer from lack of pavement or have interrupted or no 
sidewalk connection to a community pedestrian network.  Crosswalks may be few and far 
between. 
?  Using the boarding criteria described in Section III of this document, approximately 500 eligible 
stops do not have shelters, though some may have other forms of shelter from buildings, bridges 
or awnings. 
?  Not all bus stops are easily identifiable due to: 1) inconsistent placement, 2) incomplete customer 
information on bus stop signs, 3) signs that blend into the streetscape, and/or 4) one-sided signs. 
?  Only those bus stops that have a trash can and/or shelter are cleaned on a regular basis. 
Bus stop inconsistencies, as measured against the guidelines contained in this report, will be 
identified and mapped and will be the basis for development of a capital improvement program that 
can be directly considered as part of the annual capital budget development process.  The existing bus 
stop management database with its detailed bus stop descriptions together with boarding counts from 
the Bus Dispatch System (BDS) will facilitate identification of bus stop specific inconsistencies.  
TriMet will also be working with Metro and jurisdictions to map deficiencies in the pedestrian 
network that make it difficult and unsafe to access bus stops.  Intergovernmental agreements must be 
developed to promote joint development of bus stops and the pedestrian network.  
 
 
C.  Priorities 
 
The following are bus stop management priorities, which are either reflected in Winter 2001 
programs or anticipated in future programs: 
 
?  Improve underdeveloped stops where 1) supporting infrastructure exists, 2) it is physically 
feasible, and 3) it is fiscally responsible.  Improvements start with pavement and access upgrades, 
followed by shelters (100 shelters / year) and other customer amenities. 
?  Improve customer information through expansion of existing methods and implementation of 
innovative new methods.  Examples include shelter and pole-mounted printed information and 
electronic real-time (Transit Tracker) displays. 
?  Replace all bus stop signage with signs that are readily distinguished, even in active streetscapes, 
and to be equally identified from both directions.  Locate bus stops, signs and amenities 
consistent with guidelines and equitably among all communities served by TriMet.   
?  Evaluate all sites for bus stop amenities placement.  Place shelters where it is feasible, where 
existing protection is unavailable (i.e., no awnings, etc.), and according to TriMet guidelines. 
?  Work with jurisdictions to identify deficiencies in the pedestrian network.  Establish priorities 
based on pedestrian safety and existing and potential transit use.  Develop strategies to work with 
property owners to improve the pedestrian connectivity to bus stops, where viable. 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Limitations and Priorities 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 4 
?  Pursue agreements with jurisdictions and public utility agencies to facilitate placement of 
shelters, benches, lighting and trashcans. 
?  Secure resources or partnerships that target improved and consistent maintenance of all bus stops.  
This includes cleaning stops on a regular basis, not just those with bus shelters, and keeping stops 
free of graffiti and litter. 
?  Find revenue-generating opportunities through the use of ad shelters, ad benches, and similar 
programs. 
?  Maintain and expand public outreach programs and find more effective ways to solicit, process 
and respond to community and customer input. 
?  Improve operating efficiencies through bus stop spacing that is consistent with these guidelines.  
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Stop Location and Spacing 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 5 
III.  The Bus Stop  
 
It is impossible to force every bus stop to conform to a standard.  However, TriMet maintains guidelines 
to maximize the effectiveness of its bus service.  These guidelines define preferred designs for bus stop 
location, layout, amenities and applying transit-preferential street treatments.  The most important of 
many considerations are listed in this document. 
  
A.  Stop Location and Spacing (New Stops, Moves and Consolidations) 
 
Approach 
Stop location and spacing will always depend on individual circumstances.  However, one must 
weigh the options and choose based on well-understood criteria.  Generally TriMet expects riders to 
walk up to a quarter-mile to reach the stop. 
 
When determining new bus stop locations proceed as if placing stops for the first time.  If an existing 
stop does not fit into the process listed below, there must be a very compelling reason to retain it (e.g., 
if significant investment has already been made at the stop, or if there is heavy use by riders who are 
elderly or disabled and a new location would clearly degrade service for those riders).  A stop should 
remain in service as designed for at least 5-10 years. 
 
Tools 
Choices for stop location will determine access to: pedestrian crossings; transfer lines; major transit 
generators; and general neighborhood employment and activity areas. 
 
 
What to do 
Preferred bus stop locations are determined in the following sequence:  
?  Transfer Locations: All intersections with other bus lines/MAX (light rail). 
?  Designated Crossings: Stops at 
signalized intersections with safe 
pedestrian crossings (aim for spacing 
of 780 feet).  
?  Other Major Stops: Major transit trip 
generators (at closest intersection with 
crosswalk, where available). 
?  Locations based on stop spacing: 
Dense areas (22 or more 
units/acre): Aim for 3 blocks/780 
feet.  Less than that is only 
appropriate in special 
circumstances on a  stop-by-stop 
basis or for safety.  For non-
residential or employment areas 
use an equivalent 56 persons/acre. 
Included in ?dense areas? should 
be regional designated centers: 
Regional Centers, Town Centers, 
and Main Streets. 
Medium to low density areas (4 to 
22 units/acre): 4 blocks/1,000 feet. 
Less than that only for special 
circumstances on stop-by-stop 
basis or for safety. 
How to determine levels of density 
1.  The standards must be adjusted to account for the 
difference between net and gross acreage. Taking 
an average of 25% of gross acreage used for such 
things as right-of-way (calculated for three 
representative neighborhoods in Portland ? Lents, 
Arbor Lodge, and Multnomah), 22 units/acre 
becomes approximately 16 units/total acre 
(including right-of-way). 
2.  Mixed use, commercial and industrial areas should 
also be included by using a conversion to identify 
the number of people per acre (employees for 
employment areas and residents for residential 
areas). Using an average of just over 2.5 persons 
per household (1990-97 average ? Metro data), this 
means: 
?  Dense areas = 41 or more persons/acre 
?  Medium to low density = 8 to 41 persons/acre 
?  Low to rural density = less than 8 persons/acre 
3.  Future growth needs to be accounted for as well, 
and can be determined by looking at zoning and 
regional growth projections.  
 
For more information, please contact Metro. 
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Stop Location and Spacing 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 6 
Low to rural density areas (below 4 units/acre or 10 persons/acre): As needed based on above 
considerations.  No more frequent than every 1,000 feet. 
 
Bus stop spacing will continue to be governed by a combination of density and subjective issues such 
as neighborhood demographics, available alternatives, safety, public input and efficient bus 
operations.  It is intended that this process be objective, but also flexible enough to respond to unique 
needs and circumstances.  
 
As programs or requests for bus stop changes call for the review of specific bus stops, these spacing 
criteria will be considered.  Even key bus stops may require adjustment (e.g., nearside to farside 
placement).  Long term user and operating benefits will be weighed against project costs and 
neighborhood/rider objections to proposed changes.  
 
Pages 7 and 8 show examples of stop locations for areas of dense development and areas of lower 
density development. 
 
What to consider 
The following is a checklist of the most important considerations: 
 
Safety 
 
Waiting, boarding and alighting must be safe 
 
Access to a safe street crossing/crosswalk 
 
Provide adequate sight distance, i.e., provide visibility between bus driver and waiting riders 
 
Service quality tradeoffs ? fewer stops mean the following: 
 
Faster service 
 
More potential for amenities at each stop 
 
May require a longer walk from/to origin/destination 
 
Stops must be suitable for bus operations 
 
Safe access into and out of bus stop location (no parking) 
 
Provide bus operators with adequate view of street and pedestrian areas 
 
Provide adequate sight distance for autos before bus stop, so drivers are aware the bus is 
stopped 
 
Possible impacts on traffic safety and traffic delay 
 
Input and review by the public and by neighborhood and business associations 
 
Pedestrian safety to and from the stop and at the bus stop 
 
Accessible for all 
 
Minimize slope 
 
If necessary, construct 5? x 8? concrete pad at stop 
 
Check for curb ramps at intersection and on surrounding streets 
 
Maximize accessibility to neighborhood or major generators 
 
Preference for intersections at streets that connect into surrounding neighborhood 
 
At major transit generators, locate the stop near pedestrian access to the generator, preferably at 
signal 
 
Look at pedestrian pathways (formal and informal), not just streets 
 
Stops should be paired, at same intersection when possible 
 
Ensure compatibility with adjacent properties 
 
Do not move existing stops for trash, noise, and/or nuisance.  Instead, seek ways to address the 
problem directly. 
 
background image
B
u
s
 
S
t
o
p
 
G
u
i
d
e
l
i
n
e
s
 
S
t
o
p
 
L
o
c
a
t
i
o
n
 
a
n
d
 
S
p
a
c
i
n
g
 
6
/
1
5
/
2
0
0
6
 
 
P
a
g
e
 
7
 
 
 
(safe crossing)
(major transit 
trip generator)
(transfer point)
(transfer point)
(safe crossing)
Preferred Stop Locations for Dense Development 
Preferred Stop Locations for Low-Mid Density Development 
Initially, plan stops at safe crossings, transfer points, and major transit generators 
Diagram 1 
background image
B
u
s
 
S
t
o
p
 
G
u
i
d
e
l
i
n
e
s
 
S
t
o
p
 
L
o
c
a
t
i
o
n
 
a
n
d
 
S
p
a
c
i
n
g
 
6
/
1
5
/
2
0
0
6
 
 
P
a
g
e
 
8
 
 
 
 
spacing 
Preferred Stop Locations for Dense Development 
spacing 
spacing 
Spacing Target: Average 780 feet (3 blocks) 
General range from 700 - 1,320 feet 
Preferred Stop Locations for Low-Mid Density Development 
Spacing Target: Average 1,000 feet 
spacing 
spacing 
General range from 600 - 1,000 feet 
Then plan stops at intersections that are spaced appropriately between the initial stops. 
Diagram 2 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Stop Placement 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 9 
B.  Stop Placement 
 
Approach 
Stops are placed at locations: 
?  that are safe for passengers and vehicles,  
?  that may be easily accessed by the surrounding neighborhood, major transit generators and/or 
intersecting transit services, and   
?  where improvements in safety, convenience and/or reduced trip times outweigh negative impacts. 
 
Tools 
The placement of the bus stop in relation to intersection: farside; nearside; midblock; off-street.  
Please see Appendix C. Additional Stop and Zone Materials, Diagram 1 for illustrations. 
 
What to do 
 
 Table 1.  Stop Placement 
Situation 
Preferred Placement 
Any signalized intersection where bus can stop out of travel lane 
Farside 
If bus turns at intersection 
Farside 
Intersection with many right turns 
Farside 
Complex intersections with multi-phase signals or dual turn lanes 
Farside 
If nearside curb extension prevents autos from trying to turn right in 
front of bus 
Nearside 
If two or more consecutive stops have signals 
Alternate nearside and 
farside (starting 
nearside) to maximize 
advantage from timed 
signals 
If obvious, heavy single-direction transfer activity 
One nearside; one 
farside to eliminate 
crossing required to 
transfer 
If blocks are too long to have all stops at intersections 
Midblock 
Major transit generators not served by stops at intersections 
Midblock 
Midblock pedestrian-crossing combined with midblock pedestrian 
access into block 
Midblock 
Transit center 
Off-street 
Major transit generator that cannot be served by on-street stop, or where 
ridership gain will far outweigh inconvenience to passengers already on-
board 
Off-street 
 
Stops are at intersections because: 
?  walking distances amongst origins, destinations and stops are reduced for customers, 
?  street crossings are legal at intersections,  
?  street crossings are generally safer at intersections, and 
?  curb ramps and other benefits of accessibility are generally located only at intersections. 
 
Placing stops farside of the intersection is preferred in most cases for signalized intersections because 
they result in: 
?  fewer traffic delays and better safety ? bus clears intersection blocking fewer movements and 
sight lines, 
?  better pedestrian and auto sight distances, 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Stop Placement 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 10 
?  fewer conflicts between buses and pedestrians (i.e., no pedestrians trying to cross in front of bus ? 
where passing autos cannot see them), 
?  greater bus maneuvering area, 
?  more effective priority signal treatments, 
?  eliminating the danger of cars turning right in front of buses (as happens nearside), and 
?  minimized parking restrictions necessary to get bus to curb (shorter bus zones because buses use 
the intersection as part of approach to zone). 
 
What to consider 
Every site will present a unique set of issues.  The following is a checklist of the most important 
considerations: 
 
Travel time delays 
 Farside allows signal treatments to work most effectively 
 Alternate placement nearside-farside if signals occur at every stop 
 
Safety 
 Waiting, boarding and alighting must be safe 
 Steer riders toward safe street crossings 
 Watch for other pedestrians 
 Consider impacts on other traffic 
 Provide adequate sight distance, i.e., provide visibility for bus driver and waiting riders 
 
Service quality tradeoffs ? fewer stops mean 
 Faster and more efficient service 
 More potential for amenities at each stop 
 Longer walk distance to stops for some 
 
Stops must be suitable for bus operations 
 
Impacts on traffic 
 
Accessible for all 
 Slope ? no more than 2% for level surfaces, 8% for ramps 
 If necessary, construct 5? x 8? concrete pad at stop 
 Check for curb ramps at intersection and on surrounding streets 
 
Ensure compatibility with adjacent properties 
 
C.  Stop Elements, Amenities, and Customer Information 
  
 
Approach 
Use elements that clearly define the bus stop for patrons, operators, pedestrians, and motorists. 
Provide amenities that will invite ridership by making riders comfortable and confident in the service. 
Do this in locations and at a level that is appropriate to the ridership and budget.  Place amenities and 
elements of stops in configurations that maximize: 
1.  Safety 
2.  Visibility 
3.  Comfort 
 
Customer information is designed to:  
Show the way ? Provide easy identification of every bus stop.  This is achieved through colors, 
shapes and symbols that are consistent but unique within the streetscape. 
Provide basic service information ? Provide basic route information on every bus stop sign that 
includes the route number, direction of travel, major stops along the way and the fare zone.   
Provide expanded information at targeted stops ? Use visual and tactile tools, provide more 
detailed schedule information and maps at targeted stops. 
Use artistic elements to welcome patrons and neighbors ? Art can help create a sense of place, 
neighborhood ownership and comfort. 
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stop Layouts and Design 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 11 
Tools 
Bus stop elements: 
 
?  Pole and bus stop sign ? Required, identifies the bus stop. TriMet bus stop signs are used at all 
district bus stops.  Historically, these signs have been placed on any number of existing poles, 
columns, light standards and the occasional tree or bus shelter.  This is a past practice that TriMet 
is attempting to phase out.  At new or moved stops, TriMet signage is placed on dedicated TriMet 
poles;  other jurisdictional signage identifying the bus stop zone may also be placed upon a 
TriMet bus stop pole. 
 
Poles should be placed two feet from the curb with informational signs flag-mounted away from 
the street or poles placed behind the sidewalk and informational signs flag-mounted towards the 
street.  In both cases the sign should be oriented towards the sidewalk for pedestrian visibility.  
Farside pole and sign placements should be a minimum of 50? clear of existing pedestrian 
crossings.  Nearside pole and sign placements at signalized or controlled intersections should be 
setback 15? to 25? from pedestrian crossings.  Nearside pole and sign placements at uncontrolled 
intersections may be placed as close as one foot from a crosswalk.  Pole placement must be 
carefully planned to ensure that all bus stop elements work as designed, that all bus operators 
know exactly where to stop, and that all patrons know exactly where to board.  Proper placement 
and installation is critical to bus stop operation.  Shapes and colors of TriMet signs and poles 
will help identify the bus stop.  Please see Appendix A. Construction Specifications, Sheet 27 for 
sign and pole installation specifications. 
 
?  ADA landing pad ? Preferred.  Required at new and existing stops, stops with moderate or 
better ridership (minimum 20 daily boardings) and stops with any lift activity; preferred at all bus 
stops. 
 
TriMet defines an ADA landing pad as a clear, level landing area a minimum of 5?x 8? (10? x 8? 
is ideal) located adjacent to the TriMet bus stop sign.  At new construction sites TriMet requires 
ADA pads to be a minimum of 8?x 8?.  Construction of ADA pads is pursued at locations where a 
connection to a pedestrian pathway is possible.  Please refer to Appendix A. Construction 
Specifications, Sheets 1, 5, & 16 for concrete specifications. 
 
?  Rear landing pad ? Preferred.  In addition to an ADA accessible landing pad to access the front 
door of buses, TriMet prefers to have an additional landing pad at the rear door.   The rear door 
landing pad should be considered when more than eight (8) daily passenger alightings exist in 
addition to criteria that warrants an ADA landing pad.  
 
Rear landing pads must be accompanied by a front door ADA landing area.  This landing area 
must also be clear of obstacles and at least 4?x 6?.  At new construction sites a rearlanding pad 
should always be pursued, but is not required.  
 
?  Bus zone ? When necessary.  At bus stops where accessibility improvements are planned, and 
parking is available, bus zones, no parking areas (NPAs) or other parking control options should 
be placed. TriMet cannot guarantee bus stop accessibility unless the bus has a clear path to the 
curb.  
For additional information, please see Section III, Part E Roadway Treatments. 
 
Bus stop amenities: 
 
?  Shelter ? Optional.  TriMet continues to use ridership figures as the primary criterion for 
determining shelter placement warrants.  Yet several additional criteria are also considered when 
ridership figures do not support shelter placement.  
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stop Layouts and Design 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 12 
Preferred for stops with 35 or more boardings per weekday 
Infrequent service ? minimum of 30 daily boardings on routes where peak headways are 
greater than fifteen minutes  
Lift usage ? minimum of 15 weekday boardings and 4% lift usage 
Proximity to senior housing and a minimum of 20 daily boardings 
Shelters funded and maintained by others 
Development of large new activity centers adjacent to transit where ridership is projected 
to meet criteria 
Consolidated bus stops ? combined ridership totals increase likelihood of shelter 
placement  
 
If a bus stop meets TriMet?s shelter criteria it may be considered for bus shelter placement. 
Meeting these criteria does not guarantee shelter installation.  Existing site conditions and 
pedestrian infrastructure, public right-of-way availability, accessibility and safety issues, and 
other concerns must be reviewed and addressed before future bus shelter placements are 
confirmed. 
 
Bus shelter placement and orientation should follow the layout options shown in Diagrams 3 and 
4.  In instances where none of the suggested layouts apply or are feasible, the following must be 
maintained:  
Five feet of pedestrian passby, including clearance between poles, hydrants and other 
obstacles.  
ADA landing pad adjacent to sign and outside of shelter.  
Clear pathway from the ADA waiting area inside the shelter to the ADA landing pad. 
Clear pathway from the rear door landing area to the pedestrian path. 
 
A variety of bus shelter shapes and sizes are available to address site restrictions and 
opportunities, and ridership needs.  Please see Table 2 for descriptions. 
 
Table 2.  Shelter Types 
Shelter 
Type 
Dimensions  
(in feet) 
Minimum 
Required Setback 
(from curb, in feet) 
Minimum Daily 
Boardings  
Other 
8.5 x 4.5 x 8 
11 
35 
Basic and most common shelter; 
sited in business and retail districts, 
residential neighborhoods, industrial 
and manufacturing areas, etc. 
8.5 x 2.5 x 8 
9  
35 
Narrow version of B shelter; pursued 
when a B shelter is warranted but 
right-of-way is limited. 
BX 
12 x 4.5 x 8 
11 
60 
Longer version of B shelter; option 
at stops with strong usage. 
AX 
12 x 2.5 x 8 
60 
Rarely used; a possibility at stops 
with strong usage and limited 
setback. 
BB 
16 x 4.5 x 8 
11 
90 
Double length shelter; only used at 
stops with significant ridership and 
likely only at activity centers. 
AA 
16 x 2.5 x 8 
90 
Rarely used; narrower version of 
BB. 
High 
Capacity 
Varies 
Varies 
>200 
Special shelters for extremely high 
usage areas e.g., transit centers, light 
rail stations and high transfer points. 
Awning 
Varies 
Not applicable 
Not applicable 
Protection provided by businesses? 
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stop Layouts and Design 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 13 
The specifications for TriMet?s current bus shelters as well as shelter pad specifications can be 
found in Appendices B. Stop Amenities and C. Construction Specifications, Sheets 1-4, 17-20, & 
23.  Also, refer to Section VI, for shelter maintenance information. 
 
?  Seating ? Optional.  Since TriMet has several seating options, bench placement can be 
considered at any stop where: 
Accessibility is provided 
Placement does not compromise safety (it is too close to the street, causes a tripping hazard, 
etc.) 
Placement does not compromise accessibility (bench partially blocks the sidewalk, infringes 
on the ADA or rear landing pad, etc.) 
Ad bench placement is allowed 
 
Benches can generally be sited like bus shelters; however, they should not be placed closer than three-
and-a-half feet from the curb or six feet from the curb when a travel lane exists immediately adjacent 
to the curb.  The same clearance requirements placed on shelters apply here.  Benches should be 
oriented towards the street or the direction of the approaching bus.  Table 3 describes current seating 
options. 
 
Table 3.  Seating Types 
Type of Seat 
Length 
(in feet) 
Criteria for Placement 
Notes 
Shelter Bench 
4.0 
N/A 
Placed in TriMet shelters. 
Premium Bench 
6.5 
Minimum of 25 daily 
boardings; appropriate 
surroundings 
Often placed in business and 
retail districts where shelters 
are not appropriate. 
S
t
a
n
d
a
r
d
 
Ad Bench 
~6.0 
Will be considered at any 
stop lacking amenities if in 
a safe location. 
Placed for ad exposure or at 
TriMet?s request. 
Flip Seat 
N/A 
Minimum of 20 daily 
boardings; appropriate site 
Very space efficient, reserved 
for special situations. 
S
p
e
c
i
a
l
i
z
e
d
 
 
Simme Seat 
N/A 
Minimum of 20 daily 
boardings 
Mounted on bus stop pole, 
appropriate where there are 
curb tight sidewalks (pole 
placed behind sidewalk). 
 
Trash can ? Optional.  Trash cans are placed in areas of high ridership, transfer locations and 
places where the potential for accumulating trash is apparent (near fast food restaurants, 
convenience stores and places where windblown trash collects).  They are also placed at stops by 
request. Placement must not infringe upon the ADA pad or pedestrian pathway.  It must not 
compromise direct access between the ADA waiting area and the ADA landing pad or access 
between either ADA area and the sidewalk.  
 
?  Lighting ? Optional.  Currently several options exist.  The existing environment usually dictates 
which option to use.  TriMet pursues both overhead lighting oriented towards the bus stop 
boarding area and bus shelter lighting.  The current goal is to provide 1.5 ? 2 foot candles of light 
around the bus stop area. 
 
Customer information: 
 
?  Printed Information ? Optional.  Several choices of bus catcher information displays (BCID) 
are available to display schedule information at bus stops.  Large (2? x 4?) units are mounted in 
shelters.  Transit tubes and smaller framed units are attached to TriMet bus stop poles.  Braille 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stop Layouts and Design 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 14 
discs provide stop identification for visually impaired patrons.  Placement criteria for these and 
other information tools are determined by TriMet?s Information Development Department (IDP).  
For specific placement criteria, please refer to Table 4. 
 
?  Transit Tracker ? Optional.  Displays in shelters that provide real time bus arrival information.  
The Transit Tracker siting criteria are intended to be independently applicable to: 
the entire system; 
an area of emphasis (e.g., the Interstate Corridor, or a major activity center); or   
one route. 
Primary Criteria (stop-level): 
Relatively high boardings (actual or projected) 
High transfer rate 
Relatively low service frequency 
Poor on-time performance and/or poor headway adherence 
Not at end of line 
Secondary Criteria (stop-level): 
A bus shelter is available 
Electricity is available 
Three or fewer routes served 
Partnership opportunities exist 
 
Note:  The idea behind the low service frequency is that TT seems more valuable in situations where transit 
service is less frequent.  With frequent service, a passenger may not be as concerned about how long they 
must wait, and the value of knowing exactly when the bus will arrive may not be as great as in situations 
with less frequency.  Also, these criteria are not intended to be applied conjunctively, but rather they have 
different weights, are scored in total, and are used primarily for ranking purposes.  For example, a site 
having high boardings but low transfers scores lower than another site with the same number of boardings 
but with more transfers
 
 
Table 4.  Customer Information Tools 
Information Tools 
Function 
Where 
Stop design consistency, 
unique shape and color of sign 
& pole 
Identification 
All stops 
Bus stop sign 
Basic service information 
and orientation 
All stops 
BCID units 
 
Schedule, route map 
 
Stops with bus shelters or 
on TriMet poles (at locations 
with high ridership, transfer 
points, transit centers, transit 
generators and in some cases to 
promote new service). 
Braille discs (the status of this 
program needs to be reviewed) 
Tactile bus stop 
identification for visually 
impaired patrons 
On TriMet poles  
Transit Tracker 
Automated bus arrival 
times 
Stops with bus shelters 
(focused at locations with high 
ridership, transfers) 
Bus stop art 
Connection to community, 
creating sense of place 
Stops near neighborhood nodes, 
pedestrian activity 
 
What TriMet wants to accomplish 
TriMet places bus stop elements, amenities and customer information to: 
?  provide safe, level landing pads for front and rear doors (front door pad must be ADA compliant); 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stop Layouts and Design 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 15 
?  make waiting customers visible to the bus operator and vice versa; 
?  minimize maneuvering difficulty for riders with wheelchairs and other ADA mobility devices; 
?  make all parts of the transit experience as comfortable and convenient as possible, given financial 
resources; 
?  keep accessible through-path on sidewalk; 
?  provide a clear and consistent on-street image;  
?  ensure that TriMet poles and signs are readily visible to patrons, pedestrians, bus operators, and 
motorists; 
?  provide basic information to orient bus patrons; and 
?  provide targeted information that enhances the riding experience. 
 
 
 
Things to consider 
Every site will present a unique list of issues.  The following is a checklist of the most important 
considerations: 
For elements and amenities: 
 
Visibility of passengers to operators, and vice versa 
 
Accessible for all 
 Slope 
 Minimum 5? x 8? ADA concrete pad at stop 
 
Safety 
 Waiting, boarding and alighting must be safe 
 Provide adequate sight distance, i.e., provide visibility between bus driver and waiting riders 
 
Stops must be suitable for bus operations 
 
Ridership and lift usage 
 
Elderly housing, hospitals and compelling land uses can lower minimum criteria for amenities  
 
Clear sight lines for pedestrians and traffic 
 
Ensure compatibility with adjacent properties  
 
Avoid private property when possible  
 
Consider possible partnerships with private landowners and businesses (e.g., awnings, Adopt-A-
Stop, etc.) when needed 
 
Minimize conflict with trees and other nearby features 
 
Cost 
 Initial capital and installation cost 
 Long-term maintenance cost 
 Replacement cost 
 
For customer information, also consider: 
 
Patron usage 
 
Transfer locations 
 
Service frequency 
 
Schedule reliability  
 
Special needs 
 
Labor availability 
 
Stop location on route 
 
 
 
 
 
background image
B
u
s
 
S
t
o
p
 
G
u
i
d
e
l
i
n
e
s
 
B
u
s
 
S
t
o
p
 
L
a
y
o
u
t
s
 
a
n
d
 
D
e
s
i
g
n
 
6
/
1
5
/
2
0
0
6
 
 
P
a
g
e
 
1
6
 
E
x
t
e
r
n
a
l
l
y
 
M
a
n
a
g
e
d
 
F
e
a
t
u
r
e
s
 
T
r
i
M
e
t
 
M
a
n
a
g
e
d
 
 
B
u
s
 
S
t
o
p
 
F
e
a
t
u
r
e
s
 
A
n
y
 
c
o
m
b
i
n
a
t
i
o
n
 
o
f
 
t
h
e
 
s
t
a
t
e
d
 
f
e
a
t
u
r
e
s
 
U
s
e
/
S
t
o
p
 
T
y
p
e
 
D
e
s
i
g
n
a
t
i
o
n
 
C
r
i
t
e
r
i
a
 
Stop Type 
No clear, safe 
pedestrian access;  
no logical, safe street 
crossing;   
unsafe topography;  
standing water; 
unpleasant site 
conditions 
No pavement; 
inadequate shoulder;  
visibility blocked; 
poor lighting; 
insufficient ADA 
clearances;   
undue exposure to 
weather/ traffic;  
shared pole;  
one sided visibility 
Poor, or lack of, 
supporting land uses;  
few or no boarding 
rides;   
closely spaced with 
another stop   
Underdeveloped 
Safe street crossing 
(corner, ADA ramps); 
sidewalk or safe 
shoulder access 
Pavement meets ADA 
clearances; 
bus stop sign on 
dedicated pole 
 
All stops meeting 
spacing/siting criteria 
Basic 
Preceding features plus:  
sidewalk connections;  curb 
extensions; crosswalks 
Preceding features plus:   
Standard (A or B) shelter 
(larger if justified); 
lighting (utility pole or 
shelter);  BCID in shelter; 
trash can; free standing bench; 
pad for rear door, when 
physically possible 
High use stops (35 BR+ / day); 
significant employer program 
participant;  apartments; 
institutions;  hospitals; 
shopping centers;  major 
business;  minor park & ride 
lots (shared use);  stops with 
significant usage by riders who 
are disabled or elderly 
Level 1 
Preceding features 
plus:  
art enhancements 
(TriMet or 
community); 
community bulletin 
board;  newspaper 
vending bins 
Preceding features 
plus: 
16? or high capacity 
shelter;  BCID or 
transit tracker; 
trash can;  bike rack;  
public telephone (dial 
out only);  free 
standing bench;  art 
work 
Major stops (200+ BR / 
day); 
transit mall;  major 
park & ride lot (TriMet 
dedicated);  all transfer 
points;  stops with 
active lift or ramp 
usage 
Level 2 
Preceding features plus 
these possible features: 
concession or nearby 
shop(s);  landscaping 
(low maintenance); 
public restroom;  U.S.  
mail box 
Preceding features 
plus: 
"Station" style shelter; 
free standing bench(s); 
bike lockers, lids or 
other long-term storage; 
operator building and 
restroom as needed; 
ticket vending machine; 
artwork element 
Bus Rapid Transit 
service;  transit centers; 
high volume park & 
rides;  major transfer 
hubs 
Level 3 
Table 5.  Bus Stop Classification 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stop Layouts and Design 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 17 
D.  Bus Stop Layouts and Design 
 
In the past, bus stops were designed on a stop-by-stop basis leading to a wide variety of layouts 
and an inconsistent message to TriMet patrons and operators.  Successful bus stops are designed 
to link to other transportation modes, existing or planned.  Accommodating sidewalk systems is 
critical to assuring the safe and accessible transport of TriMet patrons between the origin/ 
destination and the bus stop.  
 
Following this section, bus stop layout diagrams are presented.  They are designed to respond to 
existing conditions and incorporate only basic amenities.  The diagrams are also intended to 
clearly indicate where buses stop, and where patrons wait and board.  All examples assume that 
an accessible pedestrian system is already in place. 
 
Stop elements and amenities covered in the diagrams: 
?  TriMet pole and bus stop sign ? Required.  The pole/sign is the cornerstone of all bus stops.  
Its placement must be considered carefully.   
?  Bus stop landing area ? An ADA landing area is required by federal and state law for all new 
stops. Optimally, TriMet will provide a safe landing area for all bus doors.  The ADA landing 
area must be placed adjacent to the bus stop sign whenever possible. 
?  Bus zone or no parking area ? Required where parking might otherwise block the bus?s 
ability to pull to the curb.  The bus must get to the curb to provide accessible entry.  
Eliminating parking at the stop accomplishes that goal.  Curb extensions and other expensive 
solutions are discussed in Section III, Part E Roadway Treatments.   
?  Bus shelter and shelter pad ? Optional.  Shelter from the elements makes the transit 
experience more pleasant.  The shelter?s placement, and its orientation to other elements are 
critical. 
?  Trash can ? Optional.  Placement is often an afterthought.  When placement is planned, trash 
cans should be incorporated in the bus stop design. 
 
Stop elements and amenities not covered in the diagrams: 
?  Curb ramps ? The following layouts assume curb ramps are present.  If they are missing, 
TriMet or the local jurisdiction will install at least one when constructing other 
improvements. 
?  Lights and other amenities ? Great enhancements, but not covered in these diagrams.  These 
are optional elements. 
?  Bus zone and no parking area signage ? Every jurisdiction does it differently.  One to four 
poles are possible.  These are too variable to show in a diagram successfully. 
?  Service information ? Important, but not critical to stop layout because the information is 
usually attached to a bus shelter or bus stop pole. 
?  Trees, fire hydrants, mailboxes, driveways, power poles, etc. ? Continue to be accommodated 
on a stop-by-stop basis. 
 
Standard clearance requirements at all stops: 
?  Sidewalk clearance ? Maintain minimum five feet of sidewalk clearance 
?  Accessible pathway ? Minimum five foot wide path between shelter and any utility objects 
?  Road clearance ? Minimum two foot clearance between shelter and edge of curb (extra care 
must be taken because newer vehicles have longer tail-swing) 
?  Building clearance ? Minimum 12? from buildings, fences, and other structures to allow 
room for maintenance 
?  ADA landing area ? Minimum 5? x 8? ?clear and level surface? at curb for lift or ramp 
operation 
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stop Layouts and Design 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 18 
Requirements for all stops with shelters: 
?  ADA waiting area in shelters ? Minimum 2?6? x 4? space must be kept clear for mandatory 
waiting area to accommodate mobility devices. 
?  Visibility ? Shelters must not block motorists? or pedestrians? line of sight  
?  Relation to bus stop ? Shelter should be within a compact space, close to landing area for 
access to bus (generally within 25?). 
background image
B
u
s
 
S
t
o
p
 
G
u
i
d
e
l
i
n
e
s
 
B
u
s
 
S
t
o
p
 
L
a
y
o
u
t
s
 
a
n
d
 
D
e
s
i
g
n
 
6
/
1
5
/
2
0
0
6
 
 
P
a
g
e
 
1
9
 
 
 
Bus Zone/NPA 
 
Bus Zone/NPA
 
Bus Zone/NPA
Existing sidewalk 
TM sign/pole 
Property line
Landing 
pad 
Landing 
pad 
Existing sidewalk 
Property line
Existing sidewalk 
Property line
Landing 
pad 
Landing 
pad 
?A? Shelter 
?A? Shelter 
TM sign/pole 
TM sign/pole 
Landing & 
Shelter pad
 
Landing & 
Shelter pad
 
Bus stop design:  Sidewalks with furnishing zones 
 
Basic  
 
 
 
 
             Expanded  
Bus Zone/NPA 
 
Bus Zone/NPA
 
Bus Zone/NPA
 
Existing sidewalk 
TM sign/pole 
Property line
Landing 
pad 
Landing 
pad 
Existing sidewalk 
Property line
Existing sidewalk 
Property line
Landing 
pad 
Landing 
pad 
?A? Shelter 
?A? Shelter 
TM sign/pole 
TM sign/pole 
Landing & 
Shelter pad
 
Landing & 
Shelter pad
 
 
 
Trash can
 
Trash can
 
Trash can
 
Diagram 3 
background image
B
u
s
 
S
t
o
p
 
G
u
i
d
e
l
i
n
e
s
 
B
u
s
 
S
t
o
p
s
 
L
a
y
o
u
t
 
a
n
d
 
D
e
s
i
g
n
 
6
/
1
5
/
2
0
0
6
 
 
P
a
g
e
 
2
0
 
 
 
Bus Zone/NPA 
Bus Zone/NPA 
Bus Zone/NPA 
Landing 
pad 
?B? Shelter 
?B? Shelter 
Property line
Property line
Property line
TM sign/pole 
TM sign/pole 
TM sign/pole 
Landing & 
Shelter pad
 
Landing & 
Shelter pad
 
Existing sidewalk 
Existing sidewalk 
Existing sidewalk 
Bus Zone/NPA
Bus Zone/NPA
Bus Zone/NPA 
Landing 
pad 
?BX? Shelter 
?BX? Shelter 
Property line
Property line
Property line
TM sign/pole 
TM sign/pole 
TM sign/pole 
Landing & 
Shelter pad
 
Landing & 
Shelter pad
 
Existing sidewalk 
Existing sidewalk 
Existing sidewalk 
Basic  
 
 
 
 
                 Expanded 
Bus stop design:  Sidewalks without furnishing zones  
Premium 
 
 
 
 
Diagram 4 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Roadway Treatments 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 21 
E.   Roadway Treatments 
 
Approach 
Change management or structure of roadway to improve transit efficiency and accessibility.  
Focus on locations or corridors with the highest delays and/or those that create the most 
variability in on-time performance.  Consider ridership and lift usage at stops. 
 
Tools 
1.   Bus zones or other parking restrictions  
A bus stop is not considered accessible unless the bus can reach the curb.  Bus zones, no 
parking areas (NPAs) and other parking restrictions are often necessary to assure access.  Bus 
zones or NPAs are required when:  
?  it is determined that a stop must be accessible. 
?  parking is allowed at the stop. 
?  there is not justification for a curb extension, stop move or stop deletion. 
?  buses lay over. 
 
Nearside (NS) Bus Zones - preferred length is 80? measured from the bus stop sign.  In 
extreme circumstances NS bus zones can be shortened to 60?, however buses may not be 
able to clear the travel lane.  At signalized intersections the bus should stop a minimum 
of 15? from the pedestrian crossing so that approaching drivers will be able to see 
pedestrians using the crosswalk.  The area between crosswalk and bus stop must also 
prohibit parking. 
 
Farside (FS) Bus Zones ? preferred length is 80? measured from the crosswalk.  In all 
instances the rear of the bus must clear the crosswalk.  Farside zones can be shortened to 
60?, however buses may not be able to clear the travel lane. 
 
Midblock (AT or OP) Bus Zones ? preferred length is 90? measured from the bus stop 
sign.  A minimum length for midblock zones is determined on a site-by-site basis.  These 
zones are infrequently used, but are found on ?super-blocks? often opposite of ?T? 
intersections in high-density areas and along mid- and lower density area roadways with 
few intersections.   
 
Bus zones must be clearly marked ? since parking control is provided by jurisdictions, so is 
the signage and marking requirements, resulting in several variations.  Generally bus zones 
are marked by a front zone sign/pole, and a rear zone sign/pole.  At farside zones, bus stop 
markers are often used to indicate where the bus should stop (to allow enough space to 
pullout).  An NPA sign/pole may be added at the front of a bus zone to clearly define 
ambiguous frontage (i.e., between a zone and a driveway, or a zone and a fire hydrant).  The 
City of Portland applies yellow tape to the curb tops in bus zones to further define the space. 
 
Please refer to Appendix C. Additional Stop and Zone Materials, Diagrams 2 & 3 for 
technical specifications, incorporating driveways, etc. 
 
2.   Curb extensions incorporating transit stops 
Curb extensions are a popular roadway treatment often used in streetscape improvement 
plans.  For best effect, extensions are placed along a corridor in series of two or four to an 
intersection.  Under this scenario the extensions improve pedestrian connections by 
shortening street crossing
 
distances, and improving sight angles for pedestrians and motorists. 
For transit, curb extensions have several benefits. They: 
?  provide buses with access to the curb from the travel lane without deviation (no pulling in 
or merging) thereby reducing dwell time. 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Roadway Treatments 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 22 
?  can reduce nearside stop turning conflicts on two lane roads by blocking through traffic. 
?  provide patron waiting and boarding areas separated from pedestrian movements on 
sidewalks.  
?  provide room for stop amenities or other streetscape features. 
?  visually designate a street as a pedestrian friendly transit corridor. 
 
Designing/building curb extensions that work well with transit is not an easy task.  Designers 
must battle with the competing cross slopes of the existing roadway and sidewalks, consider 
drainage and relocate sewer grates.  As a result, few extensions actually provide a landing 
area that allows low floor bus ramps to deploy at an ADA acceptable slope.  
 
Following are the general requirements for transit stop curb extensions: 
?  Transit curb extensions should be paired with a pedestrian or transit curb extension across 
the travel street. 
?  Curb extensions must be clearly marked/designated to improve their visibility to 
motorists. 
?  Extensions must provide a minimum 32? of curb line free of ramps, wings and curb 
returns.  At farside extensions, the bus must be clear of the crosswalk, requiring a 
minimum of 42? of clear curb line. 
?  A 6?x 8? clear space must be defined at front and rear door locations (door locations 
should be indicated by curb tape or paint). 
?  Bus shelters, poles, trees, benches, trash cans and other amenities must be placed a 
minimum of three-and-a-half feet clear of the curb face. 
?  Placement of curb extensions, whether nearside, farside, at signalized or non-signalized 
intersections must be made on a case-by-case basis.  Generally, nearside curb extensions 
are preferred at non-signalized intersections. 
 
Technical information for curb extensions can be found in Appendix A. Construction 
Specifications, Sheet 24, and Appendix C. Additional Stop and Zone Materials, Diagram 4. 
 
3.   Bus pullouts and bus pads 
A bus pullout?s primary function is to move buses out of travel lanes where they might 
impede traffic flow.  Although there are scenarios where this is a valuable function, TriMet 
does not actively pursue the placement of bus pullouts at regular bus stops because it reduces 
the efficiency of transit service.  TriMet will consider accepting pullouts: 
?  at bus layovers (where buses park for several minutes) 
?  at selected bus stops on roads with at least two of the following: 
posted speed limit at or above 45 mph  
ridership above 35 daily boardings (or six (6) daily lift boardings) 
potential safety issues 
 
Concrete bus pads are often incorporated in pullout designs but are also used at curbside bus 
stops.  Bus pads are considered on a case-by-case basis but are generally found at stops with 
frequent service, significant ridership, or where heavy bus braking and acceleration is 
necessary. 
 
Technical information for pullouts and pads can be found in Appendix A. Construction 
Specifications, Sheets 25 & 26, and Appendix C. Additional Stop and Zone Materials, 
Diagram 5. 
 
4.  ?Except Bus? signage, queue jump signals and bus only lanes  
These treatments should be pursued on major trunk routes, crosstown routes or any high 
frequency bus routes with significant traffic delays during peak periods.  ?Except Bus? 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Roadway Treatments 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 23 
signage is the most common treatment where a nearside bus stop at a signalized intersection 
uses a right turn pocket.  Queue jump signals are used in conjunction with an ?except bus? 
queue jump lane (especially when there is no farside lane) to provide safe merging into traffic 
lane.  Bus only lanes provide exclusive right-of-way to bypass congestion, but are only used 
when adequate right-of-way is available.  
 
What to do 
Each treatment has differing effectiveness based on the individual circumstances.  Detailed 
analysis of such issues as traffic volume, ridership, safety, right-of-way, and delay to transit are 
required.  The City of Portland?s Transit Preferential Streets Program Sourcebook (June 1997), 
developed with TriMet participation, and TriMet?s Streamline project guidelines contain more 
information on these tools.  
 
Things to consider 
Every site will present a unique list of issues.  Use the following as a checklist of the most 
important considerations: 
 
Pedestrian safety 
 
Traffic safety 
 
Transit operation safety 
 
Schedule reliability  
 
Transit travel time and speeds 
 
Impact on traffic  
 
Costs/Benefits 
 
F.   Bus Stop Access 
It is essential that bus riders have safe access to their bus stop.  Walking on narrow roadway 
shoulders, through mud or puddles, or through ditches is unacceptable to most bus riders and is 
often unsafe.  TriMet does not hold responsibility for construction or maintenance of sidewalks or 
curb ramps, but TriMet can leverage their construction through partnerships with jurisdictions 
and property owners or solicitation of regional funding for their construction.  The pedestrian 
network is not only essential for transit access, but benefits the community and the region by 
encouraging walking for local travel. 
 
TriMet must work with Metro and local jurisdictions to identify deficiencies in the pedestrian 
network using geographic information system (GIS) tools and then assign priorities for a 
pedestrian network development program.  Some key considerations would include: 
?  Direct, paved, ADA compliant walk connections between any moderate-to-dense 
neighborhood or business center and transit stops.  These should be on at least one side of the 
street. 
?  Pedestrian connections need to be continuous, with a safe crosswalk where sidewalks must 
shift from one side of the street to another.  Driveways need to be limited and well lit for 
pedestrian safety.  
?  Designated and protected pedestrian crosswalks across arterial streets, no further apart than 
three blocks or 780 feet. 
?  Street lighting, particularly at street crossings. 
?  ADA compliant curb ramps at each intersection. 
?  Sidewalks need to be in good repair and free of trip hazards. 
?  Sidewalks and bus stops will be coordinated to provide ADA clearances and amenities of 
mutual benefit to both pedestrians and bus riders. 
TriMet will support efforts to secure funding for pedestrian network development including 
Federal programs and their local allocation, designation of improvement districts or assignment 
of local Traffic Impact Fees (TIF) or other local tax mechanisms. 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Citizen Involvement 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 24 
IV.  Program Partnerships 
 
A.  Citizen Involvement  
Bus stops as public spaces are as much a part of a community as streets, pathways, parks and plazas. 
TriMet encourages communities and citizens to recognize their value and to build a sense of 
ownership.  TriMet, in partnership with Stop Oregon Litter and Vandalism (SOLV), promotes several 
ways for citizens to participate in the care of their local stops. 
 
Adopt-A-Stop ? A customer agrees to pick up the litter, clean the stop amenities and report any 
items needing repair in exchange for gloves, cleaning supplies and a steady supply of bus tickets.  
 
Keep-A-Can ? If trash is an issue at a particular stop, customers or local businesses can sponsor a 
trash can.  Under the program, volunteers agree to empty and provide service for a trash can.  In 
return, TriMet will provide an attractive, industrial strength can, liner, and soda can recycling 
container for the stop.  
 
TriMet also offers other programs that do not relate directly to bus stops but give citizens the 
opportunity to support the public transit system.   Details on transit, safety advocacy or any other 
TriMet opportunity are available through TriMet?s Customer Service Department. 
 
B.  Development Review  
1.  Background 
TriMet has been conducting development review on transit-adjacent development for over six 
years.  This review process has fostered strong relationships with local jurisdictions, while 
helping to facilitate better designs for new development.  The review process enables TriMet to 
be involved early enough in the process to influence the land use and infrastructure designs being 
proposed.  Including transit improvements as part of new development helps to mitigate for 
transportation impacts and allows the cost of these amenities to be shared by developers.  In the 
end, these partnerships stretch resources and create a more comprehensive transit system. 
 
2.  Improving stop placement 
With an emphasis on bus stop improvement and support, TriMet primarily reviews development 
projects located directly on transit routes.  For significant projects, stop spacing, location and 
usage along the adjacent route segment are analyzed to determine whether stop relocation or 
adjustment would facilitate: a) better access to transit, b) patron and pedestrian safety, c) transit 
operational efficiency, or d) traffic safety.  If appropriate, modifications to roadway and frontage 
design, signalization, pedestrian pathways and street or parking lot crossings will be considered. 
 
3.  Private sector purchasing amenities, joining SOLV, adopting stops 
Depending on the size and nature of the development or development action, TriMet may request 
improvements to adjacent bus stops.  If frontage improvements are planned TriMet will request 
the addition of an ADA landing pad and a rear door landing pad at stops that lack them.  If 
ridership potential exists, TriMet may request that a developer provide a bus shelter, a bench or 
other bus stop amenities as warranted.  In some instances, developers may want to provide a bus 
shelter where only limited ridership is projected (e.g., to satisfy a condition of approval or to 
receive an exemption from certain conditions of approval).  In this scenario, TriMet asks 
developers to take an active role in caring for the stop by joining SOLV, adopting the stop, 
sponsoring a trash can or agreeing to regularly clean the stop. 
 
4.  Private sector designing transit stops and plazas 
Some jurisdictions are asking developers and their architects to incorporate transit stops into their  
projects? designs.  Building and frontage themes are replicated at the bus stop, creating transit 
plazas that visually relate to the project.  Awnings, columns, pedestals, shelters, benches and 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Public Partnerships 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 25 
public art provided by developers are not standard TriMet issue, therefore, their care becomes the 
individual property owner?s responsibility (TriMet still provides and maintains signage and 
customer information). 
 
C.  Public Partnerships 
1.  Responding to the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) 
The 2040 Framework presents a vision for livability for the Portland metropolitan area.  It defines 
the Portland and Vancouver city centers which are surrounded by regional centers, town centers, 
station areas and main streets, all of which have levels of urban density that call for concentrated 
transit services.  The plan also calls for an extensive transit network that serves all communities 
with various forms of transit - from light rail transit to local neighborhood buses. 
 
The RTP is the 5-year plan that responds to the transportation vision introduced in the 2040 
Framework.  The RTP, last adopted in 2000, is specific about both the levels of transit services to 
be provided and the mode split targets for communities to use transit and other alternative modes 
of travel.  Jurisdictions, thus, must adopt Transportation Systems Plans (TSPs), which 
demonstrate the means by which they expect to achieve the mode split targets. 
 
TriMet is a necessary partner in both the formulation and execution of these plans.  Jurisdictions 
and TriMet must work together to define transit priority corridors, traffic management tools and 
streetscape improvements that will encourage reduced reliance on the single-occupant vehicle. 
This partnership is also critical to encourage land uses along transit corridors (Transit Oriented 
Development or TOD) that take advantage of the public investment in transit services.    
 
2.  TriMet partners to improve other jurisdictions projects 
TriMet Project Planning staff is available to provide support for jurisdictional planning efforts 
that have transportation elements.  Town center plans, corridor development, streetscape 
improvement plans, street-widening projects, traffic calming plans and TSP development are a 
few examples of planning and implementation efforts that can benefit from TriMet input.  
Jurisdictional plans that recognize, coordinate with or incorporate TriMet service and capital 
improvement plans will likely result in better transportation and transit products. 
 
3.  Jurisdictions partner with TriMet to improve transit projects 
Project Planning also invites key jurisdictional staff to be part of TriMet project teams.  Their 
support and input is critical to the success of TriMet projects as well.  The cooperation amongst 
jurisdictional partners influences key planning decisions, facilitates key design elements, 
promotes simplified permitting and improves interagency communication.   
 
4.  Improving coordination through IGAs and MOUs 
Intergovernmental Agreements (IGA) and Memorandums of Understanding (MOU) are 
documents that recognize project and program partnerships.  TriMet and the City of Portland 
have developed several IGAs that have greatly improved TriMet?s ability to provide accessibility 
and comfort to neighborhood bus stops.  For example, a carriage walk agreement between Project 
Planning and the Bureau of Maintenance has allowed the agencies to coordinate bus stop 
accessibility improvements, like ADA landing pads and curb ramps, with the city?s own efforts to 
upgrade the pedestrian infrastructure with curb ramps and accessible sidewalks.  A bus shelter 
siting agreement has allowed TriMet and the City to
 
simplify the siting and permitting process, 
putting amenities on the street more quickly.  TriMet continues to pursue agreements like these 
with its regional partners to make better and more efficient use of available funding, and to 
provide timely, coordinated projects.  
 
 
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stop Development Projects 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 26 
V.  Bus Stop Development Projects  
 
TriMet initiates capital projects to make significant improvements to route efficiency, on street and bus 
stop safety, accessibility and comfort.  TriMet utilizes the tools and methodology introduced in these 
guidelines to provide an improved product that integrates with existing transit service.  
 
Following are recent or current capital projects, their intent and their effect. 
 
 
 
Low Floor Bus 1996-2010 
 
INITIATED: 1996 with the purchase of TriMet?s first low floor buses and the  
         commitment to replace all high floor buses by 2010. 
 
COMPLETED: Ongoing ?will be completed when every bus line utilizing low floor  
                          buses has received low floor bus wayside improvements. 
 
STATUS 2002: Lines 4, 8, 15, 19, 33, 54, 56, 72 and 75 have received wayside  
                          improvements. 
 
PRIMARY GOAL: To significantly improve patron accessibility and safety at bus stops  
                                at  impacted stops on appropriate routes.  
 
TARGET: Functional accessibility at 70% of selected route?s bus stops. ADA  
                 accessibility at 50% of selected route?s bus stops. 
 
PRIMARY TOOLS: 
1.  Bus stop relocation
, consolidation
 and removal  
2.  Bus zones and parking restrictions  
3.  Curb ramps 
4.  ADA and rear landing pads 
5.  New poles and signs 
6.  Limited amenities (benches, shelters and trash cans) 
 
L
o
w
 
F
l
o
o
r
 
B
u
s
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stop Development Projects 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 27 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bus Shelter Expansion 2000 
 
INITIATED:   2000 with a public announcement of the placement of 100 new bus shelters during  
FY 2000/2001. 
 
COMPLETED: Ongoing ? current plan to continue until 500 new shelters have been placed.  
 
STATUS 2002: Underway?will site, permit, construct pads for and place shelters at 100  
  new sites by July 2002. 
 
PRIMARY GOAL: To improve patron comfort at bus stops currently lacking shelter. Upgrading  
                                  accessibility if needed. 
 
TARGET: Meet primary goal. 
 
PRIMARY TOOLS: 
1.  Bus shelters  
2.  Bus shelter pads 
3.  Curb ramps 
4.  ADA and rear landing pads 
5.  New poles and signs 
6.  Bus zones and parking restrictions  
7.  Limited additional amenities (trash cans, lighting, BCIDs) 
 
B
u
s
 
S
h
e
l
t
e
r
 
E
x
p
a
n
s
i
o
n
 
Streamline 1999-2005 
 
INITIATED: 1999 with the release of the 99/00 Capital budget. 
 
COMPLETED: Ongoing ? currently five lines have been selected to receive Streamline treatment. 
 
STATUS 2002: Lines 4, 72 and 12 are in the process of receiving Streamline improvements. 
 
PRIMARY GOAL: To improve bus service reliability and reduce travel time while also improving  
                                patron safety, accessibility and comfort on selected routes.  
 
TARGETS: Reduce travel time to significantly impact riders? perception of timesavings. Reduce  
                    resources necessary to operate service at current frequency. 
 
PRIMARY TOOLS: 
1.  Traffic signal transit priority treatments 
2.  Roadway treatments (bus only lanes, queue jump and bypass lanes, curb extensions, turning   
     radius improvements, lane adjustments etc.) 
3.  Bus stop relocation
, consolidation
 and removal  
4.  Bus zones and parking restrictions  
5.  Curb ramps 
6.  ADA and rear door pads 
7.  New poles and signs 
8.  Amenities improvements -benches, shelters, trash cans, lighting 
9.  Route simplification 
 
S
t
r
e
a
m
l
i
n
e
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stop Development Projects 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 28 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bus Shelter Advertising Program 
 
INITIATED: 1999-2000 with the permitting and placement of 50 ad shelters. 
 
COMPLETED: Ongoing 
 
STATUS 2002: Currently approaching 100 sites, permitting and siting on hold 
 
PRIMARY GOAL: To offset the cost of improving, upgrading and maintaining first class bus stops 
 
 
 
           
and amenities programs. 
 
TARGETS: Provide accessible, safe, lighted, covered bus stops at more locations. 
 
PRIMARY TOOLS: 
1.  Amenities improvements -benches, shelters, trash cans, lighting, transit tracker 
2.  Bus shelter electrification 
3.  Potential enhanced cleaning and maintenance rotation 
4.  Bus stop relocation, consolidation and removal  
5.  Bus zones and parking restrictions  
6.  Curb ramps 
7.  ADA and rear door pads 
8.  New poles and signs 
 
 
B
u
s
 
S
h
e
l
t
e
r
 
A
d
v
e
r
t
i
s
i
n
g
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Maintenance Standards 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 29 
VI.  
Maintenance Guidelines 
 
A.  Introduction 
On-street amenities provide an opportunity for increased transit use, improved efficiency of transit 
operations and capital improvements that enhance the communities in which they are located. 
Maintenance of these amenities accommodates the needs of passengers, transit operations and 
adjacent property owners. 
 
The perception, utilization and public support for public transit are in large measure predicated on the 
condition in which transit amenities are maintained.  Over 214,000 passengers use TriMet on a daily 
basis.  Facilities Management intends to provide passenger areas that will not only make transit a 
pleasurable experience for them but also increase the number of riders using these amenities.  
 
B.  Goal 
The goal is to provide TriMet?s service district with consistent, high-quality bus stop and passenger 
facilities at all times.  
 
C.  Description of TriMet Maintained Amenities 
TriMet bus stops include at minimum a bus stop sign with the following potential enhancements: 
?  Bus stop pole (TriMet owned) 
?  ADA landing pad 
?  Bus shelter and bench 
?  BCID 
?  Premium bench 
?  Trash can 
 
D.  Standards 
Highest consideration shall be given to the safety, comfort and convenience of transit passengers.  
Impacts to the adjacent property owner(s) are also given consideration.  All maintenance activities 
shall maximize safety and minimize disruption to the community, transit passengers and transit 
operations.  TriMet?s cleaning and maintenance of amenities shall be avoided during passenger rush 
hours.  Vehicles shall not impede passenger boarding areas or impede normal traffic flow.  All 
employees or contractors shall be professional and courteous at all times. 
 
E.  Routine Maintenance 
The following standards shall be used by TriMet in evaluating maintenance services in order to 
provide a safe, clean and attractive passenger environment.  
 
Definition of a clean bus stop: 
?  free from debris, e.g., cigarette butts, cups, newspapers, etc. 
?  free from foreign substances, e.g., gum, spills, food, etc. 
?  free from insects and weeds 
?  free from graffiti (written or etched)  
?  free from unauthorized stickers or posters 
 
Definition of a well-maintained bus stop: 
?  overall passenger facilities in good repair 
?  areas and improvements are in good condition and all repairs are current 
?  all amenities (e.g., shelters, benches, trash receptacles) are properly installed to meet the 
requirements of city ordinances and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 
?  furniture surfaces are in good condition, e.g., no rust, marring, scratches, etc. 
?  signage, walls, seating and kiosks are in good condition 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Maintenance Standards 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 30 
?  lighting in good working order at all times 
?  free from overhanging trees or brush 
 
Guideline for repair & maintenance: 
?  Repairs are performed by both in-house employees and contractors.  
 
Guidelines for cleaning: 
?  Pick-up trash and debris within a 15? radius of bus stop areas (blowers shall not be used). 
?  Remove graffiti, stickers and unauthorized signs and posters. 
?  Power wash all amenities with water.  Using a ladder, clean the shelter roof inside and outside 
with a soft bristled brush until all dirt has been removed.  Clean and flush gutters and drain holes 
of all debris.  Clean the shelter frame, bench and windows (inside and outside) until all dirt has 
been removed using soft bristled brush and pressure washer.  Dry windows with a squeegee so 
that no smears or streaks remain visible.  Wipe benches completely dry after cleaning or graffiti 
removal to allow immediate customer use and to prevent claims for damaged clothing. 
    
F.  Emergency Cleaning 
All emergency cleanings shall be completed within four (4) hours of notification, except broken glass, 
which shall be replaced within two (2) hours of notification. 
 
G.  Waste Disposal 
Trash in and around shelters and stops gets collected and disposed of in various ways.  Whenever 
possible, TriMet seeks sponsors to assist with the growing trash problem. 
 
In most cases, TriMet provides the trash receptacle at a particular shelter.  The sponsor collects and 
disposes of the trash as needed.  A plaque on the trash can denotes the sponsor?s name.  TriMet 
maintains the trash can by providing the liner insert, and repairs and repaints (due to graffiti) on an as-
needed basis. 
 
For locations without sponsors, TriMet has its own in-house trash collection crew currently consisting 
of two (2) employees and one (1) trash dump truck.  The crew follows a regular route schedule and 
also assists in emergency trash pick up as needed.   When a sponsor neglects a trash can due to 
moving, vacation, etc., the crew assists until another sponsor is found. 
 
Trash collected by TriMet is compacted in the dump truck and taken to a Metro collection site as 
needed.  Metro currently provides vouchers to TriMet for no-cost disposal.  
 
H.  Anti-Litter and Graffiti Programs 
TriMet partners with SOLV to provide anti-litter and graffiti programs, in addition to the regular 
maintenance routines described above.  The SOLV program consists of three major components: 
?  Adopt-A-Stop: Please see Section IV, Part A Citizen Involvement. 
?  Keep-A-Can: Please see Section IV, Part A Citizen Involvement. 
?  First Step Youth Program: During the summer, SOLV and TriMet organize groups of at-risk 
students to clean up street litter and graffiti, focusing on TriMet transit corridors.  TriMet 
provides group payment, supervision and transportation. 
 
I.   Bus Stop Amenities Replacement 
Bus stop features are replaced as a result of accidents, vandalism or general wear over time.  Regular 
maintenance will extend the life of bus shelters and other bus stop features, but their replacement is 
eventually required.  The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) identifies the following criteria for the 
replacement of bus stop shelters: 
?  condition compromises customer safety 
?  exceeds a 15-year life cycle 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Maintenance Standards 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 31 
?  customer security is in some way compromised 
?  parts for repair and maintenance are no longer available 
?  the shelter is not in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act 
 
A bus shelter replacement schedule is shown in Table 4 of the CIP. 
 
Bus stop signs are similarly replaced if they pose a safety concern for bus riders; they have been 
damaged or vandalized; they impede movement in conflict with ADA guidelines or exceed an 8-year 
life cycle.  Bus stop features may be in good condition beyond their expected life in which case 
replacement would be deferred.  Signs, shelters and other amenities may be upgraded or moved to 
reflect changes in bus stop use or coordination with other development projects.  
 
 
 
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stops Management Section 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 32 
VII.  Organizational Support  
 
A.  Capital Projects Management Section  
Primary responsibility and accountability for bus stops ? their design, placement, shelters 
and other amenities ? lies with the Capital Projects Management Section of the Project Planning 
Department.  This nine-person section works closely with other TriMet departments to provide for the 
regular maintenance and management of bus stops as well as implementation of bus stop development 
programs.  Following is a brief description of the Section?s positions and their responsibilities.  
 
Programs Manager: Responsible for developing and implementing a 5-year Bus Stops Management 
and Development Plan, which includes negotiating agreements with each major jurisdiction.  The 
Manager is also responsible for coordinating programs and managing the department and program 
budgets and contracts.  The Capital Projects Management Section, including positions matrixed from 
other departments, report directly to the Programs Manager for bus stops program related activities. 
 
Project Planner:
 
Provides lead support for field checks and sign placement.  The planner also 
conducts development reviews with respect to inclusion of bus stop facilities and coordinates 
programs with other jurisdictions, developers and other TriMet units.  The planner prepares work 
orders, reviews Customer Service Inquiries (CSIs) and other requests associated with bus stops and 
shelters. 
 
Project Planner: Works with the Programs Manager to develop and update the 5-year Bus Stops 
Management and Development Plan.  Provides lead support for development and coordination of the 
Streamline Bus Improvement Program and other agency initiatives.   
 
Project Planner:  Works closely with all members of the section.  This position conducts field 
investigations, prepares conceptual designs for bus stop improvements and identifies right-of-way and 
permit requirements for new or modified stops.  The planner also manages the bicycle facility 
development program including expansion of lockers and racks. 
 
Maintenance Supervisor: Assesses and manages the cleaning and repair needs and contracts and is 
responsible for quality control for these efforts.  This position performs hands-on supervision of field 
maintenance personnel and conducts field checks for quality, accuracy and timeliness of services 
provided.  
 
 
Engineer:
 
Works closely with all members of the section but also reports to the Project 
Implementation Department within the Capital Projects and Facilities Division.  Using TriMet and 
jurisdiction standards, the Engineer prepares design and construction drawings for all bus stop 
improvements.  The Engineer orders utility checks, works with jurisdictions regarding joint 
construction or traffic management issues, establishes specifications for procurement contracts of bus 
stop shelters, signs and other amenities and oversees their installation.   
 
Adopt A Stop Program Coordinator: This person monitors partnership agreements for the 
servicing of bus stops, shelters and trash receptacles and is a contract employee of SOLV.  The 
coordinator develops, implements and coordinates all aspects of a special outreach program focusing 
on TriMet?s bus routes. 
 
Planner/Analyst: Responsible for building and maintaining TriMet?s central bus stops database. This 
position is a significant resource for the planning, analysis and GIS mapping of bus stops and 
supporting information.  The Planner/Analyst uses a Global Positioning System locator device to 
accurately locate bus stops within the geographic information system files.  This person also prepares 
status and performance reports to track cleaning, repair, response to complaints and work orders.   
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Interdepartmental Involvement 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 33 
Community Relations Specialist: Serve as a central point of contact for all external and internal 
communications pertaining to bus stop and P&R related inquiries.  Working with the Section, this 
person tracks and responds to all CSI inquiries from the general public.  This person also prepares 
mailings and notices for bus stop changes and sets up and supports community meetings pertaining to 
bus stop programs.  
 
B.  Interdepartmental Involvement 
 
Overall responsibility for bus stops management resides with the Bus Stops Section.  However, some 
issues require review and input from a broad cross-section of TriMet divisions.  
 
?  The Service Planning Department, in concert with the Scheduling Department, determines 
routes and the type of services to be provided along the routes.  These have a direct bearing on the 
location and design of bus stops. 
 
?  The Field Operations Supervisors are in the best position to identify bus stop problems and 
operational concerns that influence bus stop placement.  Road Supervisors request bus stop 
changes based on field observations and as required to accommodate construction projects or 
events that cause the realignment of service.  They also temporarily reroute service when bus 
stops are affected by construction activities.  Road Supervisors also receive customer comments 
in the course of their surveillance activities.  Similarly, Bus Operators also pass on issues that 
they identify or comments from their bus riders. 
 
?  Maintenance Technicians in the Facilities Management Department repair and maintain stops 
and shelters.  Maintenance technicians also receive customer comments in the course of their 
activities, which are managed within their group or passed to the Bus Stops Section. 
 
?  The Information Development Department of the Marketing and Customer Service Division 
prepares specifications for signage and information displays and determines locations for other 
customer information.  The Marketing Department manages the shelter and bench advertising 
programs.  Individual requests and needs for bus stop changes funnel through the Customer 
Service Department and are recorded in a Customer Service Inquiry database, which is accessed 
by the Bus Stops Management Section for research and response.  Employer outreach efforts 
conducted by the Marketing Department provide input for program development. 
 
?  Corridor and route-specific projects, which may include bus stop improvements, are managed by 
the Capital Projects Section within the Project Planning Department. 
 
?  The Land Development Section, within the Project Planning Department, provides assistance 
with the coordination with public and private development and review of those projects. 
 
?  TriMet's Committee on Accessible Transportation (CAT) provides a very important 
consultative role in the management of bus stops.  This committee comments on bus stop design 
guidelines and the development of standard bus stop features (e.g., bus stop shelter design).  This 
perspective helps to assure compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and helps set 
priorities for bus stop development programs. 
 
?  In addition to the matrixed engineering support, other services are needed on a case-by-case basis 
from the Project Implementation Department.  Project Implementation staff also 
provide information on construction and contract standards.  The CADD section ensures 
drawings are properly prepared and updated.  
 
?  The Public Art Program also provides input for integrating art into bus stop design and in 
identifying opportunities for unique art projects associated with bus stops. 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Bus Stop Development Process 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 34 
 
?  Other groups are linked through the internal coordination plan and include Safety, Training, and 
Real Property. 
 
C.  
Bus Stops Section Development Process 
The processes for the development of bus stops may be summarized as follows: 
 
Policy development process:  
?  Set vision and direction 
?  Establish standards and guidelines 
?  Establish priorities 
?  Identify funding needs and sources 
?  Determine ways to do business, e.g., partnerships 
 
Plan development process: 
?  Develop Bus Stop Management Plan  
5-year plan (vision and needs with first year detail) 
Include capital budget plus maintenance/operating costs 
Include IGAs for each jurisdiction 
?  Perform outreach check 
Interactive with plan development 
?  Solicit review - gain approvals 
Key five inter-organizational linkages 
Finance 
Leadership Group 
Board of Directors 
 
Implementation plan process: 
?  Develop scope, schedule, budget for each program including outreach 
?  Identify resources (both funding and people) 
?  Determine needed contracts 
?  Identify and schedule needed permits 
IGA requirements 
Rights of way 
Private property siting agreements/easements 
?  Permits centralized within the Bus Stop Section 
?  Coordinate and manage implementation 
?  Evaluate programs and processes 
 
Construction: 
?  Develop field drawings for candidate sites, include digital pictures 
?  Prepare CADD drawings 
?  Consult with private property owners as required 
?  Determine and procure necessary permits 
?  Select contractor (on-call or bid) 
?  Inform Information Development (IDP), Facilities Management, and Marketing (advertising) of 
proposed changes 
?  Construction of site begins 
Inspection and digital documentation is performed by the Bus Stops Engineer I 
Notify Road Operations of completion 
?  Prepare and submit data updates 
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Operations and Maintenance 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 35 
D.  Operations and Maintenance 
Road Operations and maintenance technicians provide daily information regarding bus stop and 
shelter conditions.  Customers regularly request new bus stops and comment on bus stop conditions 
or issues.  This information will funnel through the Customer Service group.  Business and property 
owners identify specific issues with regard to bus stops and shelters located on or near their property.  
The bus stop maintenance process may be described as follows: 
 
?  Define maintenance standards per program plan 
?  Develop 5-year plan 
Priorities 
Timelines 
Preventative/responsive budgets 
Contract needs and other resources 
?  Implementation plan 
Contract management 
Quality control 
Data  
Tracking 
?  Evaluation 
Inputs 
Customer Service Inquiry (CSI) complaints [external feedback] 
Emergency call outs 
 
Standards being met 
Internal feedback 
 
Work order process: 
?  The Bus Stops Development Coordinator creates work orders based on a variety of 
sources/inputs: 
Operations ? Field Reports 
Customer Service ? CSIs 
Maintenance ? Field Reports 
Other ? Project Planning, other internal requests, etc.  
?  The work order goes directly to a single database system  
Check the Location ID 
Provide Road Operations notice of pending action(s) 
Bundle work orders where possible ? assign to maintenance staff or contractor 
?  Track work orders via the database/work order program 
?  Review and comments from Road Operations  
?  Quality control/inspection performed by Bus Stops Section 
?  The master data files are updated when the work order is closed 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Program Support (Funding) 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 36 
VIII.  Program Support (Funding) 
 
Approach 
Identify innovative ways to finance and maintain bus stop program initiatives that help offset 
program costs. 
 
Tools 
Advertising?Advertising remains an effective and popular tool for offsetting various program 
costs.  TriMet?s most visible and successful advertising ventures may be the bus and MAX 
vehicle advertising programs; however, TriMet has also established or is pursuing advertising 
programs at bus stops and bus facilities: 
?  Ad shelters: An advertising component can be attached to a standard B shelter.  This 
component allows for the placement of two 4? x 7? advertisements.  Revenues accrue on a 
monthly basis and are directly dependent on the number of ads placed within the system. 
?  Ad benches: A basic transit bench with an advertising component attached to the back. 
Benches can be placed where a bus stop is located and where sufficient room exits.  Revenues 
are dependent on the number of benches placed in the service area and are generated on a 
monthly basis. 
?  Other ad kiosks: There are additional advertising opportunities at bus stops and bus shelters. 
Advertising kiosks can be placed on telephones, sidewalks and on bus stop poles.  
  
Partnerships?The use of non-profit or public agencies to assist in daily bus stop maintenance 
and graffiti removal can be an effective and cost saving tool.  Current TriMet programs are: 
?  Anti-litter and graffiti programs: Please see Section IV, Part A Citizen Involvement and 
Section VI, Part H Anti-Litter and Graffiti Programs for more information. 
?  Public volunteers: TriMet works with local volunteers to identify safety hazards, potential 
improvements and maintenance deficiencies.  Utilizing volunteers enables TriMet to improve 
the transit system with little or no cost incurred. 
?  Leveraging: The use of leveraging enables TriMet to add amenities in the system while 
reducing the long-term cost of project implementation.  As an example, before transit 
improvements are made, TriMet searches for commitments from the community or local 
businesses to provide basic shelter maintenance and cleaning.  If a commitment is made, 
TriMet can expedite the placement of these amenities. 
?  Jurisdictional/local programs:  Grant opportunities targeting on-street or transit opportunities 
are available to jurisdictions.  Transportation System Management grants, for example, can 
be used for bus stop and roadway improvements.  TriMet can partner with jurisdictions to 
locate potential sites and provide design support for bus stop improvements. 
   
Federal, State and local funding sources?Additional monies can be obtained through seeking 
out various Federal, State and local funding opportunities. 
  
Cost efficiencies?TriMet actively looks for opportunities to save costs on the production, 
placement and installation of bus stops and amenities.  Some useful opportunities are: 
?  Standardization: Providing consistencies in materials and supplies allows for bulk rate cost 
savings.  
?  Less expensive materials: Substantial cost savings can be realized by discovering less 
expensive materials that have similar aesthetics and durability (e.g., shelter glass). 
?  Development review: Please see Section IV, Part B Development Review. 
?  Joint development/pedestrian to transit programs: TriMet works in conjunction with local 
cities and jurisdictions on joint development projects.  As a cost saving opportunity, TriMet 
and the jurisdiction assign various work responsibilities to the agency who can perform the 
task at a less expensive rate.  For example, on several joint development projects with the 
City of Portland, TriMet has utilized the Bureau of Maintenance (BOM) to perform any 
background image
Bus Stop Guidelines 
Program Support (Funding) 
6/15/2006 
 
Page 37 
necessary construction work as TriMet performs other in-kind services.  The BOM can 
perform infrastructure improvements at a much lower cost than TriMet can contract out for.  
 
What to do 
Each funding source and cost efficiency has a differing effectiveness based on individual 
circumstances.  Therefore, each opportunity should be evaluated independently.  Analysis could 
include: 
?  potential revenue gain versus capital investment 
?  feasibility of project implementation 
?  benefit to transit system 
 
Things to consider 
Every cost offsetting opportunity presents a unique list of issues.  The following is a checklist of 
the most important considerations: 
 
Advertising 
 
Placement limitations  
 
Capital investment (ad components, electrification) versus potential revenues gained 
 
Pedestrian safety 
 
ADA accessibility 
 
Aesthetic impact on environment 
 
Market feasibility 
 
Ad types  
 
Partnerships 
 
Tradeoff costs 
 
Contract monitoring commitments 
 
Program requirements, commitments 
 
Federal, State and local funding sources 
 
Local match requirements 
 
Project implementation and feasibility 
 
Cost efficiencies  
 
Public safety 
 
Increase in reliability 
 
Tradeoff costs 
 
 
 
 
 
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
background image
 
 
 
 
 
 
ATTACHMENT 2 
 
TCRP Report 19 - Chapter 3 
Curb-Side Factors 
 
 
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
ORGANIZATION
Chapter
3
17
Street-side factors include those factors associated with the roadway that influence bus operations.
This chapter begins with discussion of bus stop placement. Next is information on bus stop zone
design types. Following the detailed presentation of the different types of bus stops (e.g., bus bays,
nubs, etc.) is discussion of vehicle characteristics. This is followed by information on how roadway
and intersection design can accommodate the unique qualities of buses. The chapter ends with
information on safety and a checklist for evaluating street-side factors.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
PLACEMENT CONSIDERATIONS?Stop Spacing
18
Bus stop spacing has a major impact on transit vehicle and system performance. Stop spacing also
affects overall travel time, and therefore, demand for transit. In general, the trade-off is between:
Close stops (every block or
1/8 to 1/4 mile), short walk
distances, but more frequent
stops and a longer bus trip.
Versus
Stops farther apart, longer
walk distances, but more
infrequent stops, higher
speeds, and therefore, shorter
bus trips.
The determination of bus stop spacing is primarily based on goals that are frequently subdivided by
development type, such as residential area, commercial, and/or a central business district (CBD).
Another generally accepted procedure is placing stops at major trip generators. The following are
typical bus stop spacings used. The values represent a composite of prevailing practices.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
PLACEMENT CONSIDERATIONS?General Considerations
Chapter
3
19
After ridership potential has been established, the most critical factors in bus stop placements are
safety and avoidance of conflicts that would otherwise impede bus, car, or pedestrian flows.
In selecting a site for placement of a bus stop, the need for future passenger amenities is an important
consideration (see Chapter 4). If possible, the bus stop should be located in an area where typical
improvements, such as a bench or a passenger shelter, can be accommodated in the public right-of-
way. The final decision on bus stop location is dependent on several safety and operating elements
that require on-site evaluation. Elements to consider in bus stop placement include the following:
Safety:
?
 
Passenger protection from passing traffic
?
 
Access for people with disabilities
?
 
All-weather surface to step from/to the bus
?
 
Proximity to passenger crosswalks and curb ramps
?
 
Proximity to major trip generators
?
 
Convenient passenger transfers to routes with nearby stops
?
 
Proximity of stop for the same route in the opposite direction
?
 
Street lighting
Operating:
?
 
Adequate curb space for the number of buses expected at the stop at one time
?
 
Impact of the bus stop on adjacent properties
?
 
On-street automobile parking and truck delivery zones
?
 
Bus routing patterns (i.e., individual bus movements at an intersection)
?
 
Directions (i.e., one-way) and widths of intersection streets
?
 
Types of traffic signal controls (signal, stop, or yield)
?
 
Volumes and turning movements of other traffic
?
 
Width of sidewalks
?
 
Pedestrian activity through intersections
?
 
Proximity and traffic volumes of nearby driveways
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
PLACEMENT OF BUS STOP?Far-Side, Near-Side, and Midblock Stops
20
Determining the proper location of bus stops involves choosing among far-side, near-side, and
midblock stops (see Figure 1). Table 1 presents a comparison of the advantages and disadvantages of
each bus stop type. The following factors should be considered when selecting the type of bus stop:
?
 
Adjacent land use and activities
?
 
Bus route (for example, is bus turning at
the intersection)
?
 
Bus signal priority (e.g., extended green
suggests far side placement
?
 
Impact on intersection operations
?
 
Intersecting transit routes
?
 
Intersection geometry
?
 
Parking restrictions and requirements
?
 
Passenger origins and destinations
?
 
Pedestrian access, including accessibility
for handicap/wheelchair patrons
?
 
Physical roadside constraints (trees, poles,
driveways, etc.)
?
 
Potential patronage
?
 
Presence of bus bypass lane
?
 
Traffic control devices
Figure 1.
Example of Far-Side, Near-Side, and Midblock Stops.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
PLACEMENT OF BUS STOP?Far-Side, Near-Side, and Midblock Stops
Chapter
3
21
Table 1. Comparative Analysis of Bus Stop Locations.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Types of Stops
22
Various configurations of a roadway are available to accommodate bus service at a stop. Figure 2
illustrates different street-side bus stop design while Table 2 presents their advantages and
disadvantages.
Figure 2.
Street-Side Bus Stop Design.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Types of Bus Stops
Chapter
3
23
Table 2. Comparative Analysis of Types of Stops.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Curb-Side Bus Stop Zone Dimensions
24
A bus stop zone is the portion of a roadway marked or signed for use by buses when loading or
unloading passengers. The lengths of bus stop zones vary among different transit agencies. In general,
bus stop zones for far-side and near-side stops are a minimum of 90 and 100 feet, respectively, and
midblock stops are a minimum of 150 feet. Far-side stops after a turn typically have a minimum 90-
foot zone, however, a longer zone will result in greater ease for a bus driver to position the bus. Bus
stop zones are increased by 20 feet for articulated buses. Representative dimensions for bus stop
zones are illustrated in Figure 3.
More than one bus may be at a stop at a given time. The number of bus-loading positions required at
a given location depends on 1) the rate of bus arrivals and 2) passenger service time at the stop. Table
3 presents suggested bus stop capacity requirements based on a range of bus flow rates and passenger
service times. For example, if the service time at a stop is 30 seconds and there are 60 buses expected
in the peak hour, two bus loading positions are needed. The arrival rate is based on a Poisson
(random) arrival rate and a 5 percent chance the bus zone capacity will be exceeded.
Table 3. Recommended Bus Stop Bay Requirements.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Curb-Side Bus Stop Zone Dimensions
Chapter
3
25
Figure 3.
Typical Dimensions for On-Street Bus Stops.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Bus Bay
26
A bus bay (or turnout) is a specially constructed area separated from the travel lanes and off the
normal section of a roadway that provides for the pick up and discharge of passengers (see Figure 4).
This design allows through traffic to flow freely without the obstruction of stopped buses. Bus bays
are provided primarily on high-volume or high-speed roadways, such as suburban arterial roads.
Additionally, bus bays are frequently constructed in heavily congested downtown and shopping areas
where large numbers of passengers may board and alight.
Figure 4.
Example of a Bus Bay.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Use of Bus Bays
Chapter
3
27
Bus bays should be considered at a location when the following factors are present:
?
 
Traffic in the curb lane exceeds 250 vehicles during the peak hour,
?
 
Traffic speed is greater than 40 mph,
?
 
Bus volumes are 10 or more per peak hour on the roadway,
?
 
Passenger volumes exceed 20 to 40 boardings an hour,
?
 
Average peak-period dwell time exceeds 30 seconds per bus,
?
 
Buses are expected to layover at the end of a trip,
?
 
Potential for auto/bus conflicts warrants separation of transit and passenger vehicles,
?
 
History of repeated traffic and/or pedestrian accidents at stop location,
?
 
Right-of-way width is adequate to construct the bay without adversely affecting sidewalk
pedestrian movement,
?
 
Sight distances (i.e., hills, curves) prevent traffic from stopping safely behind a stopped bus,
?
 
A right-turn lane is used by buses as a queue jumper lane,
?
 
Appropriate bus signal priority treatment exists at an intersection,
?
 
Bus parking in the curb lane is prohibited, and
?
 
Improvements, such as widening, are planned for a major roadway. (This provides the opportunity
to include the bus bay as part of the reconstruction, resulting in a better-designed and less-costly
bus bay.)
Evidence shows that bus drivers will not use a bus bay when traffic volumes exceed 1000 vehicles
per hour per lane. Drivers explain that the heavy volumes make it extremely difficult to maneuver a
bus out of a midblock or near-side bay, and that the bus must wait an unacceptable period of time to
re-enter the travel lane. Consideration should be given to these concerns when contemplating the
design of a bay on a high-volume road. Using acceleration lanes, signal priority, or far-side (versus
near-side or midblock) placements are potential solutions.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Bus Bay Dimensions
28
The total length of the bus bay should allow room for an entrance taper, a deceleration lane, a
stopping area, an acceleration lane, and an exit taper (see Figure 5). However, the common practice is
to accept deceleration and acceleration in the through lanes and only build the tapers and the stopping
area. Providing separate deceleration and acceleration lanes is desirable on suburban arterial roads
and should be incorporated in the design wherever feasible.
An acceleration lane in a bay design allows a bus to obtain a speed that is within an acceptable range
of the through traffic speed and more comfortably merge with the through traffic. The presence of a
deceleration lane enables buses to decelerate without inhibiting through traffic. Typical bus bay
dimensions (minimum and recommended) are shown in Figure 5. Where bike lanes are provided, a
bus bay should include a marked through lane to guide bicyclists along the outside of the bus bay.
Following are some guidelines on where to locate bus bays (e.g., far side or near side):
?
 
Far-side intersection placement is desirable (may vary with site conditions). Bus bays should be
placed at signal-controlled intersections so that the signal can create gaps in traffic.
?
 
Near-side bays should be avoided because of conflicts with right-turning vehicles, delays to transit
service as buses attempt to re-enter the travel lane, and obstruction of traffic control devices and
pedestrian activity.
?
 
Midblock bus bay locations are not desirable unless associated with key pedestrian access to major
transit-oriented activity centers.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Bus Bay Dimensions
Chapter
3
29
Figure 5.
Typical Bus Bay Dimensions.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Open Bus Bay
30
The open bus bay design is a variation of the bus bay design. In an open bus bay design, the bay is
open to the upstream intersection (see Figure 6 for an example). The bus driver has the pavement
width of the upstream cross street available to decelerate and to move the bus from the travel lane into
the bay. Advantages of this design include allowing the bus to move efficiently into the bay as well as
allowing the bus to stop out of the flow of traffic. Re-entry difficulties are not eliminated; however,
they are no more difficult than with the typical bus bay design. A disadvantage for pedestrians is that
the pedestrian crossing distance at an intersection increases with an open bus bay design because the
intersection width has been increased by the width of the bay.
Figure 6.
Bus Approaching an Open Bus Bay.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Partial Open Bus Bay
Chapter
3
31
Another alternative to the bus bay design is a partial open bus bay (or a partial sidewalk extension).
This alternative allows buses to use the intersection approach in entering the bay and provides a
partial sidewalk extension to reduce pedestrian street-crossing distance. It also prevents right-turning
vehicles from using the bus bay for acceleration movements. Figure 7 illustrates the design for a
partial open bus bay.
Figure 7. Partial Open Bus Bay.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Queue Jumper Bus Bay
32
Queue jumper bus bays provide priority treatment for buses along arterial streets by allowing buses to
bypass traffic queued at congested intersections. These bus stops consist of a near-side, right-turn lane
and a far-side open bus bay. Buses are allowed to use the right-turn lane to bypass traffic congestion
and proceed through the intersection. The right-turn lane could be signed "Right Turns Only?Buses
Excepted." Queue jumpers provide the double benefit of removing stopped buses from the traffic
stream (to benefit general traffic operations) and guiding moving buses through congested
intersections (to benefit bus operations). Figure 8 is a photograph of a queue jumper bus bay while
Figure 9 illustrates the layout for a queue jumper bus bay.
Figure 8.
Example of a Queue Jumper Bus Bay.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Queue Jumper Bus Bay
Chapter
3
33
According to the transit agencies that use queue jumper bus bays, these bays should be considered at
arterial street intersections when the following factors are present:
?
 
High-frequency bus routes have an average headway of 15 minutes or less;
?
 
Traffic volumes exceed 250 vehicles per hour in the curb lane during the peak hour;
?
 
The intersection operates at a level of service "D" or worse (see the Transportation Research
Board's Highway Capacity Manual for techniques on evaluating the operations at an intersection);
and
?
 
Land acquisitions are feasible and costs are affordable.
An exclusive bus lane, in addition to the right-turn lane, should be considered when right-turn
volumes exceed 400 vehicles per hour during the peak hour.
Notes for Comments 1, 2, 3, and 4 are on page 29.
Figure 9.
Queue Jumper Bus Bay Layout.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Nub
34
Nubs are a section of sidewalk that extend from the curb of a parking lane to the edge of the through
lane (see Figure 10). Nubs have been used as traffic-calming techniques and as bus stops. When used
as a bus stop, the buses stop in the traffic lane instead of weaving into the bus stop that is located in
the parking lane?therefore, they operate similarly to curb-side bus stops. Nubs offer additional area
for patrons to walk and wait for a bus and provide space for bus patron amenities, such as shelters and
benches. Other names used for nubs include "curb extensions" and "bus bulbs."
Nubs reduce pedestrian crossing distances, create additional parking (compared with typical bus
zones), and mitigate traffic conflicts between autos and buses merging back into the traffic stream.
Nubs should be designed to allow for an adequate turning radius for right-turn vehicles. Figure 11 is a
schematic of a typical bus stop nub design.
Nubs should be considered at sites with the following characteristics:
?
 
High pedestrian activity,
?
 
Crowded sidewalks,
?
 
Reduced pedestrian crossing distances, and
?
 
Bus stops in travel lanes.
Figure 10. Example of a Nub.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
BUS STOP ZONE DESIGN TYPES?Nub
Chapter
3
35
Nubs have particular application along streets with lower traffic speeds and/or low traffic volumes
where it would be acceptable to stop buses in the travel lane. Collector streets in neighborhoods and
designated pedestrian districts are good candidates for this type of bus stop. Nubs should be designed
to accommodate vehicle turning movements to and from side streets.
Figure 11. Typical Dimensions for a Nub.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
VEHICLE CHARACTERISTICS?Vehicle Types and Dimensions
36
In the design of facilities for buses, it is important to define a design vehicle that represents a
compilation of critical dimensions from those vehicles currently in operation. These dimensions are
used when designing roadway features. For example, the weight of the expected vehicle is important
to pavement design. The following two basic bus types are commonly used by transit service
providers: 1) 40-foot "standard" bus; and 2) 60-foot articulated bus.
Figure 12. Typical Dimensions for 40-Foot Bus.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
VEHICLE CHARACTERISTICS?Vehicle Types and Dimensions
Chapter
3
37
The standard 40-foot bus and the 60-foot articulated bus are generally the largest buses in a transit
fleet and represent the most common designs. (Currently, manufacturers are also producing 30- and
35-foot buses.) Key roadway design features, such as lane and shoulder widths, lateral and vertical
clearances, vehicle storage dimensions, and minimum turning radii are typically based on the
standard 40-foot bus. The articulated bus, while longer, has a "hinge" near the center of the vehicle
that allows maneuverability comparable to the 40-foot bus. Figures 12 and 13 show the dimensions
for a 40-foot and 60-foot bus, respectively.
Figure 13. Typical Dimensions for 60-Foot Articulated Bus.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
VEHICLE CHARACTERISTICS?Turning Radium Template
38
Design templates for minimum turning paths for single-unit (40-foot) and articulated (60-foot) buses
are shown in Figures 14 and 15, respectively. The templates are usable for either left turn or right turn
designs depending on how the template is oriented (i.e., either face-up for right turn design or face-
down for left turn design).
Figure 14. Design Template for Single-Unit (40 foot) Bus.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
VEHICLE CHARACTERISTICS?Turning Radium Template
Chapter
3
39
Figure 15. Design Template for Articulated (60-foot) Bus.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
VEHICLE CHARACTERISTICS?Wheelchair Lift
40
Presently, the most common lifts used on
buses are conventional wheelchair lifts. Figure
16 illustrates the use of a wheelchair lift. Since
the wheelchair lift may be at the front or rear
door, bus stop designs need to allow for either
possibility. Figure 17 shows the critical
dimensions for a wheelchair lift.
Low floor buses can be adjusted so the floor
height is approximately 10 inches above the
street level. Bus passengers in wheelchairs are
then able to reach the sidewalk by using a
ramp deployed from the floor of the bus. The
length of the ramp typically extends 2 to 3 feet
from the edge of the bus for a standard height
curb.
Figure 16. Wheelchair Lift in Operation.
Figure 17. Wheelchair Lift Dimensions.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
VEHICLE CHARACTERISTICS?Bikes on Buses
Chapter
3
41
Several transit agencies now have on-vehicle bus storage programs. In some cases, passengers are
allowed to bring their bicycles into the interior of the bus. In others, a bicycle rack is attached to the
front of the bus (see Figure 18). These racks generally hold two bicycles. Busturning radius design
needs to allow for the additional length of a bus with a bicycle rack attached (generally 3 feet).
Figure 18. Front-Mounted Bike Rack in Use.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION DESIGN?Roadway Design
42
Roadways and intersections with bus traffic and bus stops should be designed to accommodate the
size, weight, and turning requirements of buses. The safety and operation of a roadway improve when
these elements are incorporated into the design.
Because of their need to make frequent stops, buses generally travel in the traffic lane closest to the
curb. Therefore, consideration of the following bus clearance requirements in roadway design is
important.
?
 
Overhead obstructions should be a minimum of 12 feet above the street surface;
?
 
Obstructions should not be located within 2 feet of the edge of the street to avoid
being struck by a bus mirror;
?
 
A traffic lane used by buses should be no narrower than 12 feet in width because the
maximum bus width (including mirrors) is about 10.5 feet; and.
?
 
Desirable curb lane width (including the gutter) is 14 feet.
Selection of the roadway grade is related to topography and cut and fill material considerations.
Typically, the maximum grade for 40-foot buses is between 6 and 8 percent. The recommended grade
change between a street and a driveway is less than 6 percent.
An appropriate curb height for efficient passenger-service operation is between 6 and 9 inches. If
curbs are too high, the bus will be prevented from moving close to it and the operations of a
wheelchair lift could be negatively affected. If curbs are too low or not present, elderly persons and
passengers with mobility impairments may have difficulty boarding and alighting. The effective use
of low floor buses is also influenced by the height of the curb.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION DESIGN?Pavement
Chapter
3
43
Roadway pavements (or shoulders, if that is where the buses stop) need to be of sufficient strength to
accommodate repetitive bus axle loads of up to 25,000 pounds. Exact pavement designs will depend
on site-specific soil conditions. Areas where buses start, stop, and turn are of particular concern
because of the increased loads associated with these activities. Using reinforced concrete pavement
pads (see Figure 19) in these areas reduces pavement failure problems that are common with asphalt.
The pad should be a minimum of 11 feet wide (12 feet desirable) with a pavement section designed to
accept anticipated loadings. The length of the pad should be based on the anticipated length of the bus
that will use the bus stop and the number of buses that will be at the stop simultaneously.
Figure 19. Example of a Bus Pad.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION DESIGN?Intersections
44
The corner curb radii used at intersections (see C in Figure 20) can affect bus operations when the bus
makes a right turn. Some advantages of a properly designed curb radius are as follows:
?
 
Less bus/auto conflict at heavily used intersections
(buses can make turns at higher speeds and with less encroachment);
?
 
Higher bus operating speeds and reduced travel time; and
?
 
Improved bus patron comfort.
A trade-off in providing a large curb radius is that the crossing distance for pedestrians is increased.
This greater crossing distance increases the pedestrians' exposure to on-street vehicles and can
influence how pedestrians cross an intersection, both of which are safety concerns. The additional
time that a pedestrian is in the street because of larger curb radii should be considered in signal timing
and median treatment decisions.
The design of corner curb radii should be based on the following elements:
?
 
Design vehicle characteristics, including bus turning radius;
?
 
Width and number of lanes on the intersecting street;
?
 
Allowable bus encroachment into other traffic lanes;
?
 
On-street parking;
?
 
Angle of intersection;
?
 
Operating speed and speed reductions; and
?
 
Pedestrians.
Figure 20 shows appropriate corner radii for transit vehicles and various combinations of lane widths.
This figure can be used as a starting point; the radii values should be checked with an appropriate
turning radius template before being incorporated into a final design.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION DESIGN?Intersections
Chapter
3
45
Figure 20. Recommended Corner Radii.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION DESIGN?Driveways
46
Bus stops are commonly located near intersections. Driveways leading to gasoline stations and other
developments are also common at intersections. Ideally, bus stops should not be located close to a
driveway; however, if the situation cannot be avoided:
?
 
Attempt to keep at least one exit and entrance driveway open for vehicles
accessing the development while a bus is loading or unloading passengers.
?
 
Locate the stop to allow good visibility for vehicles leaving the
development and to minimize vehicle/bus conflicts. This is best
accomplished by placing the stop on the far side of the driveway.
?
 
Locate the stop so that passengers are not be forced to wait for a bus in the
middle of a driveway.
?
 
Locate the stop so that patrons board or alight directly from the curb rather
than from the driveway.
Transit agencies should work closely with local and state jurisdictions to preserve a safe loading zone
for passengers from either a driveway being moved or the construction of new driveways.
Cooperation in finding an alternative stop is recommended when driveways moves are unavoidable
and may severely affect the bus stop. Driveways within bus bays are of special concern. Relocating a
bus bay is expensive and may shift a sometimes unwanted burden to the adjacent property owner.
Figure 21 shows undesirable driveway situations where either visibility is restricted or the only drive
into a parking area is blocked. The figure also shows acceptable driveway situations where visibility
is enhanced and access is allowed.
Figure 21. Bus Stop Locations Relative to Driveways.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION DESIGN?Traffic Signals
Chapter
3
47
Bus stops are frequently located at signalized intersections. Traffic signal design should
accommodate buses and bus passengers. The following should be considered in designing traffic
signal systems in new developments or upgrading/redesigning signals at existing intersections:
?
 
Location of bus stops should be coordinated with traffic signal pole and signal head location. Bus
stops should be located so that buses do not totally restrict visibility of traffic signals from other
vehicles. (These problems can be effectively addressed by using far-side bus stops.)
?
 
The use of a far-side, curbside stop at a signalized intersection can cause vehicles stopping behind
the bus to queue into the intersection. A far-side bus bay is preferred at a signalized intersection.
?
 
Since all bus passengers become pedestrians upon leaving the bus, it is important to have
"WALK" and "DON'T WALK" indicators at signalized intersections at bus stops.
?
 
When traffic-actuated signals are installed, pedestrian push buttons should also be installed to (1)
activate the "WALK" and "DON'T WALK" indicators or (2) extend the signal's green indicator so
that additional time needed by the pedestrian to cross the street is provided.
?
 
Near-side stop areas are often located between the advance detectors for a traffic signal and the
crosswalk. Detectors should be located at the bus stop to enable the bus to actuate the detector and
the signal controller to obtain or extend the green light. Without a detector, a bus is forced to wait
until other traffic approaching from the same direction actuates the signal controller.
?
 
Timing of traffic signals should also reflect the specific needs of buses. Longer clearance intervals
may be required on higher speed roadways with significant bus traffic. Vehicle passage times must
provide adequate time for a bus to accelerate from the bus stop into the intersection. Intersections
adjacent to railroad tracks should incorporate the need for buses to stop at railroad crossings into
their timing and detection.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION DESIGN?Sign Locations
48
Proper signs at bus stops are an important element of good transit service. Signs serve as a source of
information to patrons and operators regarding the location of the bus stop and are excellent
marketing tools to promote transit use. For example, letter styles, sign appearance, and color choice
should be unique to the transit system so that passengers can readily identify bus stops. Doublesided
signs which provide for visibility from both directions and reflectorized signs for night time visibility
are preferred.
Bus stop signs should be placed at the location where people board the front door of the bus. The bus
stop sign shows the area where passengers should stand while waiting for the bus. It also serves as a
guide for the bus operator in positioning the vehicle at the stop. The bottom of the sign should be at
least 7 feet above ground level and should not be located closer than 2 feet from the curb face. Figure
22 shows typical bus stop sign placement standards.
Transit agencies and local and/or state jurisdictions should coordinate efforts when deciding locations
for bus stops and sign posts. In some cases, a shared sign post can be used to reduce the number of
obstructions in high pedestrian volume locations. Bus stop signs are also commonly located on a
shelter or existing pole (such as a street light). The signs should not be obstructed by trees, buildings,
or other signs. Bus stop sign posts that are not protected by a guardrail or other feature should be a
break-away type to minimize injuries and vehicular damage, and to facilitate replacement of the post.
Pavement markings associated with bus stops are generally installed and maintained by local
authorities. The most common marking is a yellow or red painted curb at the bus stops. Stop lines
and/or crosswalk markings are also desirable when the bus stop location is at an intersection.
Figure 22. Guidelines for Bus Stop Sign Placement.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION DESIGN?Traffic Control and
Regulation of Bus Stops
Chapter
3
49
Traffic regulations prohibit parking, standing, or stopping at bus stops. These regulations can be
established only when authorized by appropriate laws or ordinances. In general, an ordinance is
needed to authorize and require a transit agency to establish bus stop locations and to designate bus
stops with the appropriate signs. Another ordinance prohibits other vehicles from stopping, standing,
or parking in officially designated and appropriately signed bus stops. An allowance for passenger
vehicles to stop to load or unload passengers in the bus stops may be included.
The  Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) (maintained by the Federal Highway
Administration) includes general specifications for no parking signs at bus stops and curb markings to
indicate parking restrictions, as well as guidelines for the placement of the signs. Suggested signs in
the MUTCD are shown in Figure 23. The R7-107a sign is a permissible alternative design for the R7-
107 sign shown in the MUTCD. Other alternative designs discussed in the Manual may include a
transit logo, an approved bus symbol, a parking prohibition, the words BUS STOP, and right-, left-,
and double-headed arrows. The preferred bus symbol color is black, but other dark colors may be
used. Additionally, the transit logo may be shown on the bus face in the appropriate colors instead of
placing the logo separately. The reverse side of the sign may contain bus routing information.
The MUTCD also discusses the use of curb markings to indicate parking restrictions. At the option of
local authorities, special colors (none are specified in the MUTCD) may be used for curb markings.
When signs are not used, restrictions should be stenciled on the curb.
Figure 23. MUTCD Bus Stop Signs.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
SAFETY
50
As with all aspects of roadway design and bus operations, an important element in the design of bus
stops is safety. General safety considerations for bus stops include the following:
?
 
The bus stop must be located so that passengers may alight and board with reasonable safety.
?
 
The stopped bus will affect sight distance for pedestrians using the parallel and transverse
crosswalks at the intersection.
?
 
The stopped bus will also affect sight distance for parallel traffic and cross traffic. For instance, at
a near-side stop, vehicular right turns are facilitated and sight distance is improved when the bus
stop is set back from the crosswalk.
?
 
The bus affects the traffic stream as it enters or leaves a stop.
A recently completed study on pedestrian accidents found that approximately 2 percent of pedestrian
accidents in urban areas and 3 percent in rural areas are related to bus stops. These accidents
generally involved pedestrians who stepped into the street in front of a stopped bus and were struck
by vehicles moving in the adjacent lane. This situation develops when the line of sight between the
pedestrian and an oncoming vehicle is blocked, or when the pedestrian simply does not look for an
oncoming vehicle. This type of accident can be reduced by relocating the bus stop from the near side
of an intersection to the far side, thus encouraging pedestrians to cross the street from behind the bus
instead of in front of it. This makes pedestrians more visible to motorists approaching from behind
the bus. Not only can far-side bus stops reduce the potential for bus stop accidents involving
pedestrians, they are also less likely to obscure traffic signals, signs, and pedestrian movements at
intersections, as opposed to near-side bus stops. Also, conflicts between buses and right-turning
vehicles can be reduced by using far-side bus stops. Problems may occur, however, when cars
illegally park in far-side bus stops preventing buses from completely clearing the cross street.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
SAFETY
Chapter
3
51
Along with the minimum desirable curb length, the condition of the curb lane and the curb height can
influence the safety and efficiency of bus-passenger operation. When poor pavement conditions exist
in the curb lane, bus drivers often avoid it and stop the buses away from the curb. Boardings and
alighting operations away from the curb are more hazardous for riders than curb operations,
especially for elderly persons and passengers with disabilities during inclement weather. The
additional hazard appears to result from the increased height between the ground and the first step of
the bus and from moving vehicles (such as bicycles) between the curb and the bus.
Lighting is important for safety. A brightly lit bus stop makes it easier for the transit operator to
observe waiting passengers and allows motorists to see boarding and alighting pedestrians. Because
the step well is the most hazardous area on a transit vehicle for accidents, a brightly lit well will assist
boarding and alighting passengers as they judge distances and locations of steps and curbs. Auxiliary
lighting in the step well is required on new buses, but it will be years before this feature is universal.
The bus stop should be located either before the turn lane (for through routes) or at the far side of the
intersection in areas that have a dedicated right-hand turn lane. Transit agencies should work closely
with local and state jurisdictions wherever traffic improvements affect the safety of a bus stop. The
addition of turn lanes will often require advance planning for incorporating transit accommodations
as part of the highway project and/or for relocating the bus stop to an acceptable location.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
3
STREET-SIDE PLACEMENT CHECKLIST
52
Several items should be considered when designing and locating a bus stop on a roadway. The
following checklist of street-side items should be reviewed with each design because it brings
together related issues that can have a significant impact on the safe operations of the bus stop.
"
 
Standardization: One of the most critical factors in the street-side design and placement of a bus
stop involves standardization or consistency. Standardization is desirable because it results in less
confusion for bus operators, passengers, and motorists. Consistency in design, however, can be
difficult to achieve since traffic, parking loss, turning volume, community preference, and
political concerns can influence the decisions.
"
 
Periodic Review: A periodic review of bus stop conditions (both street side and curb side) is
recommended to ensure the safety of bus passengers. This will encourage the timely reporting of
items such as missing bus stop signs and poor pavement.
"
 
Near-Side/Far-Side/Midblock Placement: Each type of placement has advantages and
disadvantages. In general, each bus stop location should be evaluated individually to decide the
best placement for the stop.
"
 
Visibility: Bus stops should be easy to see. If the bus stop is obscured by nearby trees, poles, or
buildings, the bus operator may have difficulty locating the stop. More importantly, however,
motorists and bicyclists may not know of its existence and will be unable to take necessary
precaution when approaching and passing the stop. In addition, visibility to pedestrians crossing a
street is also an important consideration in areas that permit "right turns on red."
"
 
Bicycle Lanes and Thoroughfares: When a bike lane and a bus stop are both present, the
operators need to be able see cyclists in both directions while approaching the stop. Sufficient
sight distance for cyclists to stop safely upon encountering a stopped bus is also needed.
"
 
Traffic Signal and Signs: Bus stops should be located so that buses do not restrict visibility of
traffic signals and signs from other vehicles. Because all bus passengers become pedestrians upon
leaving the bus, pedestrian signal indicators should be considered at nearby signalized
intersections.
background image
STREET-SIDE FACTORS
STREET-SIDE PLACEMENT CHECKLIST
Chapter
3
53
"
 
Roadway Alignment: Horizontal and vertical roadway curvature reduces sight distance for bus
operations, motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians. Additionally, bus stops located on curves make
it difficult for the bus operator to stop the bus parallel to the curb and safely return to the driving
lane. Where possible, bus stops should be located on sections of relatively straight and flat
roadway. Trees and poles should not obstruct the visibility of the bus operator for cross traffic and
passenger and pedestrian movement.
"
 
Driveways: Avoid locating bus stops close to a driveway. If placing a bus stop close to a
driveway is unavoidable (for example, to lessen the loss of parking in a commercial area), keep at
least one driveway open to vehicles accessing the adjacent development while a bus is loading or
unloading passengers. Also, locate bus stops to allow full visibility for vehicles leaving an
adjacent development and to minimize vehicle/bus conflicts. Placing bus stops on the far side of
driveways will minimize conflicts; however, sight distance for left-turning vehicles from the
driveway will still be a concern.
"
 
Location of Pedestrian Crosswalks: A minimum clearance distance of 5 feet between a
pedestrian crosswalk and the front or rear of a bus at a bus stop is desirable.
"
 
Location of the Curb: Where possible, locate stops where a standard curb height of 6 inches
exists. Bus steps are designed with the assumption that the curb is the first step. It is more difficult
for elderly persons and passengers with mobility impairments to board and alight from the bus if
the curb is absent or damaged.
"
 
Street Grades: Where possible, bus stops should not be located on an upgrade in a residential
area, since the bus engine noise created when the vehicle accelerates from a stop will bother area
residents. Placing bus stops on steep grades should be avoided if slippery winter conditions
prevail.
"
 
Road Surface Conditions: Since alighting passengers generally move from their seats when the
bus decelerates on approach to a bus stop, do not locate a bus stop where the roadway is in poor
condition such as areas with broken pavement, potholes, or ruts or where a storm drain is located.
The resultant motion of the bus in such a situation may cause bus passengers to fall and injure
themselves. Boarding and standing passengers are also susceptible to falls or injuries where poor
pavement conditions or low drainage basins exist.
background image
 
 
 
 
 
 
ATTACHMENT 3 
 
TCRP Report 19 - Chapter 4 
Street-Side Factors 
 
 
 
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
ORGANIZATION
Chapter
4
55
Curb-side factors include those factors and issues that can affect the comfort, safety, and convenience
of bus patrons. The information in this chapter can be used by transit professionals to provide safe,
clean facilities at the bus stop. The chapter also provides information on how to choose bus stop
locations that improve access and convenience in pedestrian-friendly communities. Areas of
discussion include shelter design and placement, amenities, and enhancing bus patron comfort at bus
stops. Also of value to transit professionals are tables that compare the advantages and disadvantages
of the various amenities that can be included at the bus stop. A checklist provided at the end of the
chapter refers to the various curb-side elements associated with bus stop design and location.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
PEDESTRIAN ACCESS?Patron Access
56
Providing defined access to and from the bus stop is important. Sidewalks should be constructed of
impervious non-slip material and should be well drained. Access to the bus stop from the intersection
or land use should be as direct as possible. When possible, sidewalks and bus stops should be
coordinated with existing street lights to provide a minimum level of lighting and security. To
accommodate wheelchairs, sidewalks should be a minimum of 3 feet wide (preferably 4 to 5 feet
wide) and equipped with wheelchair ramps at all intersections. Other improvements include defined
pedestrian crosswalks and signals at intersections. Pedestrian enhancements, such as sidewalks,
should be coordinated with roadway improvements to help improve bus patron comfort and
convenience.
Installation of a discontinuous sidewalk from the intersection to the bus stop is one way to achieve
greater patron access to the bus stop in areas with limited or no sidewalk coverage. Although, the
sidewalk may not continue toward the next land use or along the roadway, this strategy is the first
step toward providing complete access to the bus stop. This ensures that access to the bus stop is not
through uneven grass or exposed soil, which can be further impaired by poor drainage and surface
changes during inclement weather. People who are elderly or have disabilities may find access to the
bus stop difficult as well. See Figure 24 for an example.
Figure 24. Example of Providing Access In Developing Regions.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
PEDESTRIAN ACCESS?Bus Stop to Sidewalk Connections
Chapter
4
57
Bus patrons should encounter defined pathways from the sidewalk to the back-face of the curb. To
prevent poor access from the sidewalk to the curb, a waiting pad and an accessway from the waiting
pad to the curb should be installed. When the sidewalk is parallel and directly adjacent to the curb, the
waiting pad should be installed directly behind the sidewalk. However, when the sidewalk is far from
the curb, paved access from the waiting pad to the curb is necessary. The waiting pad and accessway
should be constructed of impervious non-slip material, preferably concrete or asphalt, and have
proper drainage. Figure 25 presents two different waiting pad location scenarios for providing paved
connections between the bus waiting pad and the curb.
Patrons should not have to walk through grass or exposed soil to reach the bus. In such cases, the
areas between the sidewalk, bus stop, and curb can become worn and decline to muddy areas during
inclement weather. Snow accumulation from road clearings during the winter months can also create
additional access problems in the space between the sidewalk and curb.
Figure 25. Examples of Providing Access from the Waiting Pad to the Curb.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
PEDESTRIAN ACCESS?Coordinating Access with Commercial or
Business Development
58
A strategy to improve pedestrian access at or to bus stops is to coordinate development with the
location of the bus stop. Coordination and cooperation with the landowner or developer can enhance
the connectivity between the land use and the bus stop. To ensure optimum bus stop placement,
coordination should occur during the planning/development phase. Pedestrian improvements include
defined or designated walkways through parking lots and openings or gates through walls.
Accessways can be as elaborate as a landscaped sidewalk through the parking lot or as minimal as
painted walkways that caution drivers and direct pedestrians. As with any pedestrian improvement,
strict adherence to mobility clearances, widths, and slopes should be followed to improve access for
persons with disabilities. Safety improvements and shorter walking times can be achieved by
implementing such strategies.
Another solution is to place buildings closer to the road and place parking to the rear and sides of
buildings. Figure 26 is an example of coordinating transit with a hypothetical business office complex
by designing defined pedestrian accessways and providing a gate through the fence. Another example
of re-orienting the building or changing the location of the parking is illustrated in Chapter 2 as a
Hypothetical Medical Center.
Figure 26. Pedestrian Improvements at a Hypothetical Business Complex.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
PEDESTRIAN ACCESS?Coordinating Access With Residential
Development
Chapter
4
59
Bus passengers need efficient ways to reach the bus stop from their residences. Transit agencies need
to be involved early in the development approval process to reduce walking times and improve direct
access to and from the bus stop. Sidewalk placement that is coordinated with land use and bus stop
locations is critical to encouraging the use of transit.
Concerns over residential security have led to a proliferation of walled residential communities that
restrict access to a limited number of entry and exit points. By doing so, walking times to bus stops
may be increased because direct access may not be available. Circuitous or curvilinear sidewalks can
also increase walking times and create coordination problems for the transit agency when choosing
the final bus stop location. Curvilinear sidewalks along a street may not align with the final stop
destination and may result in access problems through grass, berms, or other landscaping features.
Coordinating sidewalk design and placement is needed between developers and transit agencies to
ensure direct access to a paved bus stop. Designing gates, openings through walls, and installing
direct sidewalks in residential communities can be coordinated with developers to reduce walking
times from the land use to the bus stop. Figure 27 is an example of coordinating access points and
sidewalk design with the location of the bus stop.
Figure 27. Example of Coordinating Transit with Residential Development Patterns.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
ADA?Accessibility Guidelines
60
The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) is broad legislation intended to make American
society more accessible to people with disabilities. It consists of five sections or titles (employment,
public services, public accommodations, telecommunications, and miscellaneous). Titles II and III
(public services and public accommodations) affect bus stop planning, design, and construction.
Although the definition of disability under the ADA is broad, bus stop placement and design most
directly affect persons with mobility and visual impairments. These impairments, which relate to the
more physical aspects of bus stop accessibility, have received the most attention.
Making new stops conform to ADA physical dimension requirements is relatively easy. Modifying
existing stops to comply with ADA, though desirable from an accessibility perspective, is not
required under ADA. Modification of existing stops is more difficult, especially if the stops are at
sites with limited easement or not subject to the transit agency's control, such as shopping malls, on
state rights-of-way, or suburban subdivisions.
The ADA, however, is concerned with more than physical dimensions. It also involves accessibility
from the point of origin to the final destination. For example, to get to the bus stop, individuals with
limited mobility or vision need a path that is free of obstacles, as well as a final destination that is
accessible. A barrier-free bus stop or shelter is of little value if the final destination is not accessible.
Though the ADA does not require retrofitting transit vehicles with lifts, an accessible vehicle is
clearly a critical link in the barrier-free trip. Full accessibility is more difficult to achieve when
different organizations are responsible for different portions of the path (which is usually the case).
Either way, the "equal access" provisions of the ADA require that the route for persons with limited
mobility or vision be as accessible as the route used by those without disabilities. A person with
disabilities should not have to travel further, or use a roundabout route, to get to a designated area.
Basic Principles for Bus Stop Design and Location to Conform to ADA
Basic aspects of design exist that encourage accessibility and are applicable to most situations.
Specific dimensions are available from several references, some of which are listed below. Some
general design considerations involve obstacles, surfaces, signs, and telephones.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
ADA?Accessibility Guidelines
Chapter
4
61
Obstacles
Examine all the paths planned from the alighting point at the bus stop to destinations off the bus stop
premises. Determine whether any protrusions exist that might restrict wheelchair movements. If
protrusions exist and they are higher than 27 inches or lower than 80 inches, a person with a vision
impairment may not be able to detect an obstacle (such as a phone kiosk) with a cane. A guide dog
may not lead the person with the impairment out of the path. Although it may not be the transit
agency's responsibility to address accessibility problems along the entire path, an obstacle anywhere
along the path may make it inaccessible for some transit users with disabilities.
Surfaces
Surfaces must be stable, firm, and slip-resistant. Such provisions are beneficial for all transit users,
but especially for those who have disabilities. Avoid abrupt changes in grade, and bevel those that
cannot be eliminated. Any drop greater than 1/2 inch or surface grade steeper than 1:20 requires a
ramp.
Signs
Signs providing route designations, bus numbers, destinations, and access information must be
designed for use by transit riders with vision impairments. Specific guidelines are given for these
signs in Section 4.30 of Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities, Transportation
Facilities and Transportation Vehicles.
 In some cases, two sets of signs may be needed to ensure
visibility for most users and to assist users with sight limitations. Route maps or timetables are not
required at the stop, though such information would be valuable to all passengers.
Telephones
Telephones at bus stops are not required under ADA, but if telephones are in place, they must not
obstruct access to the facility and must be suitable for users with hearing impairments. At least one
phone must be accessible for wheelchair users. Telephone directories must also be accessible.
Figure 28 illustrates a design approach to a bus stop with a shelter that would meet ADA
requirements.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
ADA?Accessibility Guidelines
62
Accessible Bus Stop Pad & Shelter
Minimum Dimensions
Figure 28. Shelter Design Example to Meet ADA Requirements.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
ADA?Accessibility Guidelines
Chapter
4
63
Resources and References
An excellent guide to the design of bus stops (as well as other facilities) for ADA compliance is
Americans with Disabilities Act: Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and
Facilities, Transportation Facilities, and Transportation Vehicles.
 U. S.
Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, Washington, DC, 1994.
It is commonly known as the ADA Guide.
Another useful publication, which translates the ADA Guide accessibility guidelines into specific
design parameters, is
Accessibility Handbook for Transit Facilities. Federal Transit Administration, Report
No. FTA-MA-06-0200-92-1, July 1992. Prepared by the Ketron Division of
Bionetics Corp. This document is available through the National Technical
Information Service (NTIS), Springfield, VA 22161.
As civil rights legislation, the ADA goes beyond physical dimensions to include policy and practice.
Many of these issues will be resolved through experience and in the courts. Various sources are
available for monitoring the current status of the ADA and its specific provisions. These include legal
journals, ADA-specific newsletters, and World Wide Web "home pages." Examples of each are as
follows:
Temple Law Review and Transportation Law Journal?both frequently publish analyses of
the original ADA legislation and recent developments, as do other legal journals.
TD Access & Safety Report?provides information on access, safety, and liability relating to
the transportation of people with disabilities and the transportation-disadvantaged. Published
by Serif Press, Inc., 1331 H Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20005.
Americans with Disabilities Act Document Center (http://janweb.icdi.wvu.edu/kinder/)?This
website, sponsored by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research,
contains copies of ADA regulations and technical manuals prepared or reviewed by EEOC or
the Department of Justice. Links to other Internet sources are also provided.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
WAITING OR ACCESSORY PADS?Sizing and Positioning
64
A waiting or accessory pad is a paved area at a bus stop provided for bus patrons and can contain
either a bench or a bus shelter. Amenities, such as trash receptacles or bike racks, can also be located
on the waiting pad. The size of the waiting pad depends on several factors. The length and width of
shelters and benches, clearance requirements for street furniture, location of wheelchair lift extension
(front or back door of bus), and the length of the bus are common size-determining factors. Transit
agencies, typically, have one or two accessory-pad variations to accomodate different configurations
and components that may be installed. Figure 29 illustrates elements that may influence the size and
shape of the waiting pad.
Waiting pads are usually separated from the sidewalk to preserve general pedestrian flow. It is
generally recommended that 5 feet of clearance be preserved on sidewalks to reduce potential
pedestrian conflicts and limit congestion during boardings and alightings. The pad can be located on
either side of the sidewalk, depending on available right-of-way space, utility poles, or buildings. In
either case, a paved surface should be provided from the waiting pad to the back-face of the curb to
enhance access and comfort. ADA mobility guidelines should be followed when street furniture is to
be included on a waiting pad. A waiting pad should accommodate a 5-foot (measured parallel to the
street) by 8-foot (measured from the back face of the curb) wheelchair landing pad that is free of all
street furniture and overhangs.
Figure 29. Example of Influential Factors on Waiting Pad Size.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
WAITING OR ACCESSORY PADS?Nubs
Chapter
4
65
Nubs, also known as bus bulbs or curb extensions, solve the problem of locating bus patron amenities
in dense urban environments with considerable pedestrian traffic. A nub is essentially a sidewalk
extension through the parking lane that becomes directly adjacent to the travel lane. When space
limitations prevent the inclusion of amenities, nubs create additional space at a bus stop for shelters,
benches, and other transit patron improvements along sidewalks. Nubs provide enough space for bus
patrons to comfortably board and alight from the bus away from nearby general pedestrian traffic.
Nubs also shorten the pedestrian walking distance across a street, which reduces pedestrian exposure
to on-street vehicles.
Transit agencies should consider the use of nubs at sites along crowded city sidewalks with high
patron volumes, where parking along the curb is permitted. Figure 30 is a plan view example of a
typical nub configuration.
Figure 30. Separating Bus Activities and General Pedestrian Traffic with Nubs.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
SHELTERS?Inclusion and Sizing
66
A bus shelter provides protection from the elements and seating while waiting for a bus. Standardized
shelters exist that accommodate various site demands and different passenger volumes. Typically, a
shelter is constructed of clear side-panels for clear visibility. Depending on demand and frequency of
service, a bus shelter may also have a bench.
The decision to install a shelter is a result of systemwide policy among transit agencies. Many criteria
exist to determine shelter installation at a bus stop. In most instances, the estimated number of
passenger boardings has the greatest influence. Suggested boarding levels by area type used to decide
when to install a shelter are as follows (these values represent a composite of prevailing practices):
Location
Boarding
Rural
10 boardings per day
Suburban
25 boardings per day
Urban
50 to 100 boardings per day
Other criteria used to evaluate the potential for inclusion of a shelter include
?
 
number of transfers at a stop
?
 
availability of space to construct shelters and waiting areas
?
 
number of elderly or physically challenged individuals in the area
?
 
proximity to major activity centers
?
 
frequency of service
?
 
adjacent land use compatibility
Priority may or may not be given to each of these items depending on policy. System equity or
funding availability can cause the installation decision to be made on a case-by-case basis. Local
priorities and neighborhood requests can also influence the decision to include a shelter at a bus stop.
Other factors that can influence the size of the shelter include availability of right-of-way width,
existing street furniture, utility pole locations, landscaping, existing structures, and maintaining
proper circulation distances around existing site features.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
SHELTERS?Determining the Final Location
Chapter
4
67
Ideally, the final location of a bus stop shelter should enhance the circulation patterns of patrons,
reduce the amount of pedestrian congestion at a bus stop, and reduce conflict with nearby pedestrian
activities. The location of the curb and sidewalk and the amount of available right-of-way can be
determining factors for locating a bus stop shelter. The following placement guidelines should be
used when placing a bus stop shelter on a site (see also Figure 31):
?
 
Bus stop shelters should not be placed in the 5-foot-by-8-foot wheelchair landing pad.
?
 
General ADA mobility clearance guidelines should be followed around the shelter and
between the shelter and other street furniture.
?
 
Locating shelters directly on the sidewalk or overhanging a nearby sidewalk should be
avoided because this may block or restrict general pedestrian traffic. A clearance of 3 feet
should be maintained around the shelter and an adjacent sidewalk (more is preferred).
?
 
To permit clear passage of the bus and its side mirror, a minimum distance of 2 feet should
be maintained between the back-face of the curb and the roof or panels of the shelter.
Greater distances are preferred to separate waiting passengers from nearby vehicular
traffic.
?
 
The shelter should be located as close as possible to the end of the bus stop zone so it is
highly visible to approaching buses and passing traffic. The walking distance from the
shelter to the bus is also reduced.
?
 
Locating bus stop shelters in front of store windows should be avoided when possible so as
not to interfere with advertisements and displays.
?
 
When shelters are directly adjacent to a building, a 12-inch clear space should be preserved
to permit trash removal or cleaning of the shelter.
Figure 31. Shelter Clearance Guidelines.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
SHELTERS?Configurations and Orientations
68
In orienting and configuring bus shelters, personnel should consider the environmental characteristics
of each site, because placement and design can positively or negatively influence passenger comfort.
For example, in very hot climates, particularly in areas with few tall trees, bus shelters may be
uncomfortable if they face directly east or west. However, this orientation may be appropriate in
cooler climates during the winter months. When shelter interiors are uncomfortable, patrons will seek
relief from the elements outside the shelter, appropriating walls or window ledges of nearby private
property for their use. Transit agencies should be sensitive to this issue when locating a bus stop
shelter.
Different bus shelter configurations can be used to reflect site or regional characteristics (see Figure
32). Shelters can be completely open to permit unlimited movement of air, or panels can be erected to
keep the interior of the bus shelter warm. For southern climates, perforated panels can be used to
reduce the glare while permitting ventilation. Alternatively, shelters can be fully enclosed by solid
panels and the back of the shelter may be rotated to face the street to protect waiting passengers from
splashing water or snow build-up. To enhance ventilation and to reduce the clutter that can
accumulate inside a shelter, a 6-inch clearance between the ground and the bottom of the panels is
standard in fully enclosed shelters. In any case, shelters should be coordinated with landscaping to
provide maximum protection from the elements and to enhance the visual quality of the bus stop (see
Figure 33). Shade trees reduce heat at a site and provide additional shade for patrons waiting outside
the shelter. Technology, such as misters or evapo-cooling towers, can also be used to enhance the
interior environment, however, such technology is expensive and maintenance-intensive.
Figure 32. Examples of Orientation and Panel Placement to Improve Interior Comfort.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
SHELTERS?Configurations and Orientations
Chapter
4
69
Figure 33. Placement and Orientation Options.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
SHELTERS?Advertising
70
Many transit agencies have paid advertising in bus shelters to supplement funding and to provide
other benefits. An advertising-in-shelters program provides the opportunity to install bus shelters at
bus stops that otherwise would not receive one. As part of the contract, the advertising company
installs the shelter or kiosk. Other benefits of this program include regular maintenance of the bus
stop shelters and facilities, including trash removal and installation of interior lighting at selected
sites, by the advertising agency.
The advertisements are placed on panels attached to the bus shelter to take advantage of the visibility
that the bus stop receives from passing traffic. Backlighting is sometimes used to display the images
at night. Advertisements do not necessarily have to be attached to the shelter. In some areas, kiosks
are used to display advertisements. Depending on design, the kiosk may provide additional protection
from the elements at a bus stop.
Issues associated with advertisements placed on shelters and kiosks include compatibility with local
land uses, ordinances, and safety. The signs can conflict with color schemes or limit views of adjacent
store fronts. Advertising at bus stops must also comply with local sign ordinances, which may hinder
installation in some communities.
Passenger and pedestrian safety and security are of greater concern at shelters with advertising. The
advertising panels may limit views in and around a bus stop, making it difficult for bus drivers to see
patrons. The panels can also reduce incidental surveillance from passing traffic. To prevent restricted
sight lines, advertising panels and kiosks should be placed downstream of the traffic flow. An
approaching bus driver should be able to view the interior of the shelter easily. Indirect surveillance
from passing traffic should be preserved through proper placement of the panels (see Figure 34).
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
SHELTERS?Advertising
Chapter
4
71
Figure 34. Placement Recommendations for Advertising Panels and Kiosks.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
SHELTERS?Developer Provided
72
Private developers can also provide bus stop shelters. Typically, these shelters are constructed to
serve a specific development, neighborhood, complex, or shopping mall. Facilities range in scope
from a single stop to a series of coordinated stops serving an entire residential development or office
park. The designs are often striking and closely linked visually with the major design features of the
central structure, building, or neighborhood.
Bus shelters installed by developers should meet transit agency requirements. These requirements
include an acceptable location, safe pedestrian access (i.e., direct sidewalk to the shelter), visibility
for vehicles and waiting passengers, access for those with mobility impairments, and signage. Shelter
ownership and long-term maintenance responsibilities should be determined before installation. Bus
stop location decisions should be made collaboratively by the transit agency and the developer.
When private development and transit service
collaborate on shelter installation, the benefits to
both are numerous. Transit considerations are
factored into the development from the
beginning. The development itself may become
more transit-friendly through combined transit
agency/developer design of routes to provide
service to the new development's residents. From
the developer's standpoint, designing for transit
improves the overall accessibility of the
development, may increase the feasible density
of the development, may reduce parking
requirements, and may increase pedestrian
traffic. These factors may have a positive effect
on lease (especially retail) value. Improved
accessibility can also make recruiting employees
easier. Figure 35 is an example of a developer-
installed shelter.
Figure 35. Developer-Installed Shelter.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
SHELTERS?Artistic and Thematic Designs
Chapter
4
73
Transit agencies can use artist-designed stops and shelters or other methods to ensure that stops and
shelter designs have a theme. One approach is to commission local artists to design or decorate a
shelter or waiting area. This requires considerable coordination, the support of the neighborhood, a
public relations effort sufficient to generate the interest of local artists, and, ideally, sponsorship by
some civic organization. Figure 36 shows an example of a shelter designed by a local artist.
Customized or artistically designed bus stops can make waiting for a bus more pleasant. Innovative
designs may also help provide a covered shelter or seating (e.g., flip-seats or awnings) for passengers
at locations that do not have sufficient space. However, custom-designed passenger waiting areas
should not obscure identification of the bus stop. Transit agency bus stop signs and schedule displays
should be available at these types of bus stops. The functionality of the stop should not be
compromised in the name of art?the stop should provide as much patron comfort, safety, and
security as possible.
Neighborhood or business interests may also want the shelters and bus stop signs to reflect the
character of the district. One method is to develop a distinct color or logo for each neighborhood or
route group. This can be implemented by the transit agency with appropriate coordination and
participation from the neighborhoods.
Figure 36. Artistic Shelter.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
AMENITIES?Benches
74
A bench, even without a bus shelter, provides comfort and convenience at bus stops. As with shelters,
benches are usually installed on the basis of existing or projected ridership figures. Ridership figures
below those justifying a bus shelter are commonly used. Other factors used in determining bench-
only locations include the following:
?
 
The width of the bus stop location.
?
 
Bus stops with long headways and little protection from the weather.
?
 
Locations where the landowner has denied permission to construct a shelter.
?
 
Sites that are frequently used by elderly people or people with disabilities.
?
 
Evidence that transit patrons are sitting or standing on nearby land or structures.
Two factors that greatly influence the use of benches are crowding at a site and the environment at a
site. Crowding limits patrons choices about sitting and waiting and forces patrons to wait around,
rather than in, the bus stop. Uncomfortable bus stop environmental conditions, such as heat and sun,
can also discourage use of the bench.
Preserving minimum circulation guidelines, coordinating with existing landscaping, and providing
additional waiting areas can improve bench and site utilization. The following bench placement
guidelines are recommended:
?
 
Avoid locating benches in completely exposed locations. Coordinate bench locations with
existing shade trees if possible. Otherwise, install landscaping to provide protection from
the wind and other elements.
?
 
Coordinate bench locations with existing street lights to increase visibility and enhance
security at a stop.
?
 
Locate benches on a non-slip, properly drained, concrete pad. Avoid locating benches in
undeveloped areas of the right-of-way.
?
 
Locate benches away from driveways to enhance patron safety and comfort.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
AMENITIES?Benches
Chapter
4
75
?
 
Maintain a minimum separation of 2 feet (preferably 4 feet) between the bench and the
back-face of the curb. As the traffic speed of the adjacent road increases, the distance from
the bench to the curb should be increased to ensure patron safety and comfort.
?
 
Maintain general ADA mobility clearances between the bench and other street furniture or
utilities at a bus stop.
?
 
Do not install the bench on the 5-foot by 8-foot wheelchair landing pad.
?
 
At bench-only stops, additional waiting room near the bench should be provided
(preferably protected by landscaping) to encourage bus patrons to wait at the bus stop.
Figure 37 provides an example of the circulation requirements at a bench-only bus stop with
additional seating provided.
Figure 37. Conceptual Bench and Waiting Pad Design.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
AMENITIES?Route or Patron Information
76
Route and passenger information can be displayed in various ways. A flag sign is the most common
method used by transit agencies to display information. Placement and design guidelines for flag
signs are discussed in Chapter 3. Installation of schedule holders or schedule and route information on
the shelters are also commonly used.
The actual displays mounted on the sign can include the transit agency logo, route numbers available
at the stop, type of route (local or express), and destination for a limited number of routes. Detailed
guidelines for the design of bus stop signs can be found in TCRP Report 12, "Guidelines for Transit
Facility Signing and Graphics," and should be referenced for greater detail.
Schedule holders are included at sites with large passenger volumes. The schedule holders can be
mounted on the flag sign or inside a shelter. According to "Guidelines for Transit Facility Signing and
Graphics," information in Braille can be provided when a four-sided information holder is used. A
route plaque and an information holder mounted to a sign post are shown in Figure 38.
Interior panels of shelters also can be used for posting route and schedule information. Side panels
may be large enough to display the entire system map and can include backlighting for display at
night. Shelters that lack side panels can display route and schedule information on the interior roof of
the shelter. Some recommendations for route or patron information display are as follows:
?
 
Provide updated information when changes are made to routes and schedules.
?
 
Consider the quality and appearance of information displays. A visually poor route map
conveys a negative impression of the system.
?
 
Make information displays permanent. Temporary methods for displaying information
(such as tape-mounting) create a cluttered, unsophisticated appearance at the bus stop.
?
 
Follow ADA clearance, mobility, and visual guidelines for access of information by
individuals with impairments.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
AMENITIES?Route or Patron Information
Chapter
4
77
Figure 38. Examples of Passenger Information Holders.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
AMENITIES?Vending Machines
78
Vending machines can provide passengers with reading material while they wait for the bus.
However, for local, non-commuter routes, vending machines can be undesirable for many reasons.
The machines are often poorly maintained and reduce the amount of room for mobility and waiting
(see Figure 39). Perhaps the greatest effect, though, is that trash accumulates at bus stops with
vending machines. Trash removal is time-consuming and costly.
The existence of vending machines at or near bus stops does not appear to be the result of transit
agency policy. Rather, it is a result of newsprint companies aggressively pursuing a high-profile site.
Transit agencies have limited regulatory authority concerning the placement of vending machines.
Transit agencies, if given the opportunity, should review the need for the installation of vending
machines at bus stops. The benefits to patrons of having the machines near the stop versus having to
maintain trash receptacles and keep the area free of improperly disposed material should be reviewed.
Vending machines at a bus stop should be anchored to the ground to reduce vandalism. ADA
mobility guidelines should be followed for improved site circulation (e.g., the location of the vending
machines should not obstruct the wheelchair landing pad area).
Figure 39. Image of Vending Machines at a Bus Stop.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
AMENITIES?Bicycle Storage Facilities
Chapter
4
79
Bicycle storage facilities, such as bike racks, may be provided at bus stops for the convenience of
bicyclists using transit. Designated storage facilities discourage bicycle riders from locking bikes onto
the bus facilities or on an adjacent property. Proper storage of bicycles can reduce the amount of
visual clutter at a stop by confining bikes to one area. Recommendations regarding bicycle storage
facilities are as follows:
?
 
Provide paved access to the bus stop and construct the waiting area with non-slip concrete
or asphalt that is properly drained.
?
 
Locate the storage area away from other pedestrian or patron activities to improve safety
and reduce congestion.
?
 
Coordinate the location of the storage area with existing on-site lighting.
?
 
Do not locate the storage area where views into the area are restricted by the shelter,
landscaping, or existing site elements, such as walls.
Many prefabricated storage methods are available, however, as bicycle prices have escalated in recent
years, interest has grown in storing bikes in completely enclosed containers called bike lockers (see
Figure 40) or taking bikes on the bus. Although the transit agency can obtain revenue from renting
bicycle lockers to patrons, bike lockers are large and awkward to place next to bus stop shelters on
sidewalks and present additional surfaces at a bus stop for graffiti. For these reasons, they can be
expensive to maintain.
It appears bicycle storage is associated with the
commuter market and should be installed when
demand warrants, which is primarily at major
suburban stops. Where substantial bike activity
exists, such as in university towns, on-vehicle
bike programs are a major asset. Regional
demographics should be carefully reviewed prior
to implementing such a program.
Figure 40. Example of a Bike Locker.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
AMENITIES?Trash Receptacles
80
Trash receptacles can improve the appearance of a bus stop by providing a place to dispose of trash.
The installation of trash receptacles is typically a systemwide decision and the size, shape, and color
reflect transit agency policy. Not all bus stops have trash receptacles. Low patron volumes may not
justify the inclusion of this amenity at a bus stop; however, litter at a site may warrant the inclusion of
a trash receptacle at an otherwise low-volume location.
Problems can arise when the receptacles are not regularly maintained or when the bus stop is next to a
land use that generates considerable trash such as convenience stores and fast food restaurants. In
such cases, transit agencies should work with these establishments to define maintenance
responsibilities for the bus stop and the area around the businesses. Businesses and community
groups typically are reluctant to agree to maintaining trash receptacles at public sites.
Recommendations regarding installing a trash receptacle at a bus stop are as follows:
?
 
Anchor the receptacle securely to the ground to reduce unauthorized movement.
?
 
Locate the receptacle away from wheelchair landing pad areas and allow for at least a 3-
foot separation from other street furniture.
?
 
Locate the receptacle at least 2 feet from the back of the curb.
?
 
Ensure that the receptacle, when adjacent to the roadway, does not visually obstruct
nearby driveways or land uses.
?
 
Avoid installing receptacles that have ledges or other design features that permit liquids
to pool or remain near the receptacle?this may attract insects.
?
 
Avoid locating the receptacle in direct sunlight. The heat may encourage foul odors to
develop.
Figure 41 shows the minimum circulation and separation requirements for trash receptacles at bus
stops.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
AMENITIES?Trash Receptacles
Chapter
4
81
Figure 41. Trash Receptacle Placement Guidelines.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
AMENITIES?Phones
82
Phones at bus stops offer many potential benefits for bus patrons. Patrons can make personal and
emergency calls while waiting for the bus. Phones also can provide real-time bus arrival information.
Figure 42 shows a phone at a bus stop. Some transit agencies have explicit policies regarding the
installation of phones at bus stops. Experience with phones at bus stops has been mixed. For example,
inclusion of phones at bus stops can create opportunities for illegal or unintended activities, such as
drug dealing and loitering, in and around bus stops. Loitering by non-bus patrons at bus stops appears
to increase with the installation of phones; this may discourage bus patrons from using the facility.
Transit agencies should review the potential consequences of installing a phone at a bus stop prior to
installation.
When locating a phone at a bus stop, the following guidelines should be considered:
?
 
Separate the phone and the bus stop waiting area by distance when possible.
?
 
Follow general ADA site circulation guidelines.
?
 
Remove the return phone number attached to the phone.
?
 
Limit the phone to outward calls only.
Figure 42. Example of a Phone at a Bus Stop.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
AMENITIES?Shopping Cart Storage Area
Chapter
4
83
Proper storage for shopping carts at bus stops adjacent to commercial shopping centers is needed.
Because such bus stops normally do not have storage facilities for shopping carts, carts often litter the
area around the stop and along the sidewalk accessing the stop. The sight of haphazardly placed
shopping carts around a bus stop is visually unappealing and can block sidewalk access. Figure 43
shows shopping carts abandoned at a bus stop.
Because the shopping carts are generated by the shopping center, agreements should be made
between the land owner and the transit agency to remove the carts regularly. Frequently, however, the
time between removals is too long and shopping carts accumulate at a bus stop. One solution is to
install a storage facility near the bus stop to prevent random storage in and around the stop. Factors
affecting installation of a storage facility include the location of the sidewalk, available right-of-way,
utilities, landscaping, terrain, and cost. Any cart storage facility should follow the general site
circulation guidelines and remain clear of the sidewalk and wheelchair landing pad area.
Figure 43. Shopping Carts Abandoned at a Bus Stop.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
AMENITIES?Lighting
84
Lighting affects bus patrons' perception of safety and security at a bus stop, as well as the use of the
site by non-bus patrons. Good lighting can enhance a waiting passenger's sense of comfort and
security; poor lighting may encourage unintended use of the facility by non-bus patrons, especially
after hours. Lighting is particularly important in northern climates where patrons may arrive and
return to the stop in darkness during the winter season. Illumination requirements are often a policy of
individual transit agencies; however, installing lighting that provides between 2 to 5 footcandles is the
general recommendation.
Cost and availability of power influence the decision to install direct lighting at a bus stop. Direct
lighting is expensive and difficult to achieve at remote locations. When installing direct lighting at a
bus stop, the fixtures should be vandalproof but easily maintained. For example, avoid using exposed
bulbs or elements that can be easily tampered with or destroyed.
A cost-effective approach to providing indirect lighting at a site is to locate bus stops near existing
street lights. When coordinating bus shelter or bench locations with existing street lights, the
minimum clearance guidelines for the wheelchairs should be followed. Figure 44 is an example of
coordinating a shelter with an existing street light.
Figure 44. Example of Coordinating Shelter Locations with an Existing Street Light.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
AMENITIES?Security
Chapter
4
85
Passenger security is a major issue in bus stop design and location, because the design and location of
the bus stop can positively or negatively influence a bus patron's perception of that bus stop. From the
perspective of security, landscaping, walls, advertising panels, and solid structures can restrict sight
lines and provide spaces to hide. Each of these items can be an integral part of the bus stop, either by
design or by proximity of existing land uses. Therefore, the transit agency should carefully review
which amenities are to be included at a bus stop and consider any factors that may influence security.
Other sections of this document have discussed some of these concepts and should be referenced.
Some guidelines regarding security at bus stops are as follows:
?
 
Bus stop shelters should be constructed of materials that allow clear, unobstructed
visibility of and to patrons waiting inside.
?
 
Bus stops should be at highly visible sites that permit approaching bus drivers and
passing vehicular traffic to see the bus stop clearly.
?
 
Landscaping elements that grow to heights that would reduce visibility into and out of
the bus stop should be avoided. Low-growing shrubbery and ground cover and
deciduous shade trees are preferred at bus stops. Evergreen trees provide a visual barrier
and should be avoided.
?
 
Bus stops, whenever possible, should be coordinated with existing street lighting to
improve visibility.
?
 
Bus stops should be next to existing land uses, such as stores and businesses, to enhance
surveillance of the site.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
AMENITIES?Advantages and Disadvantages
86
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
AMENITIES?Advantages and Disadvantages
Chapter
4
87
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
AMENITIES?Materials
88
Various materials can be used to construct a bus stop. The best materials are those that are weather-
resistant, can withstand continual use, and can be easily maintained. The ease with which a particular
material can be vandalized can reduce its desirability; easy-to-clean materials are desirable. Primarily,
wood, metal, concrete, glass, and plastics are used at bus stops.
Wood, sometimes used for benches, is rarely used to construct other elements because it is easily
vandalized and weathers badly.
Metal is frequently used to construct shelters, benches, bike racks, and trash receptacles. Aluminum,
although fairly inexpensive and easy to work with, is soft and easily scratched. Its high recyclability
makes it a target for theft by unscrupulous recyclers. As with any item or material, objects should be
properly affixed to prevent/discourage unauthorized removal. Metal, in combination with a plastic
coating, is a good material for benches, especially when a wire mesh design is used. The design
resists everyday wear and tear and graffiti.
The best use of concrete at bus stops is in the paving. Concrete, an excellent non-slip surface, can be
easily poured on site to construct sidewalks, waiting pads, and connections between the stop and the
curb. Concrete is too heavy and cumbersome to use in other elements at a bus stop.
Plastic is used for paneling and roofing on shelters. The material is lightweight and can be installed
with minimal effort. Clear plastic permits the interior of the shelter to be visible from a distance,
which enhances security. Depending on the desired effect, plastic can be frosted to reduce the amount
of sun entering the shelter or left clear to permit sun exposure. A major disadvantage of plastic is that
it is easily damaged or destroyed by vandalism?the material can be scratched or kicked out from its
holdings. Plastic declines over time by becoming translucent and scratched, and harsh chemical
cleaners can expedite the decline.
Tempered glass is primarily used for side panels on shelters. Visually, the material is more pleasing
than plastic and withstands environmental demands better than plastic. Unlike plastic, the material is
not damaged by repeated cleaning; broken glass, however, can create a hazard for waiting passengers.
Improperly anchored objects, such as vending machines and trash receptacles, should be avoided at
bus stops with glass because they can be used to destroy glass panels or roofs.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
AMENITIES?Materials Advantages and Disadvantages
Chapter
4
89
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
CURB-SIDE PLACEMENT CHECKLIST
90
This section of the guidelines lists topics that should be reviewed to enhance patron comfort,
convenience, and security. The topics range from the general (such as locating a bus stop in the
community) to the specific (such as preserving sight lines).
"
 
Location Within the Community: The location of the bus stop should be coordinated with the
business community and neighborhood. Businesses want to preserve clear views of storefronts and
maintain open circulation spaces in and around the storefronts. Although improperly located
shelters can obstruct business activities, bus stops can enhance both transit and business activities
when sited properly.
Homeowners are another influential voice in the community. Typically, they do not want stops in
front of their properties. Efforts to maintain bus stops in residential neighborhoods may reduce the
"not-in-my-backyard" attitudes.
Coordination between governmental agencies can enhance or impede this process. Liability can be
a major issue for governmental agencies and businesses. This is especially true when
improvements are made to sidewalks at or near bus stops. Transit agencies can create their own
regulatory hurdles to avoid liability. However, this action comes at the expense of the transit
patron, the ultimate customer. Coordination and cooperation can improve this process.
"
 
Compatibility: Bus stops should be located so as to limit conflicts with pedestrians and other
activities. Bus stops that create conflict points with pedestrians and bicyclists or reduce the
capacity of existing sidewalks should be avoided. Benches, shelters, and other bus-related facilities
should be separated from pedestrian or bicycle facilities when space permits. Because bus stops
are commonly placed near parking lots, bollards and/or a raised curb would prevent cars from
damaging bus facilities (e.g., bus shelters) or interfering with bus activities and patrons.
Bus stops should be located so as to provide safe separation of passengers and vehicles from
nearby land uses. They should not be directly next to the curb, which puts patrons close to passing
vehicles. This is especially true for stops on roads with high traffic speeds. The zone of comfort or
separation for patrons from high speed traffic may be violated when the shelter or bench is too
close to the edge of the roadway. The minimum acceptable offset for benches and shelters from
the back face of the curb is 2 feet. This distance should increase with higher speed limits.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
CURB-SIDE PLACEMENT CHECKLIST
Chapter
4
91
"
 
Direct Access to Bus Stop: Landscaping, berms, security walls, large parking lots, and
circuitous sidewalks can decrease the convenience of using transit by increasing the walking time
between the origin or destination and the bus stop. Direct access to and from the bus stop is
critical to the convenience of using transit. The transit agency can work with local jurisdictions
or developers to ensure that direct sidewalks are installed near bus stops from the intersection or
adjacent land uses. Defined paths or walkways can be installed through parking lots or
landscaping to reduce walking times and improve safety.
"
 
Impervious Ground Surfaces: Avoid locating bus stops on exposed soil, grass, or uneven
ground. For passenger comfort and convenience, a waiting pad constructed of impervious non-
slip material should be provided at the bus stop. This should be graded for proper runoff control
and meet ADA requirements for cross slopes. The bus stop should be coordinated with existing
sidewalks to provide defined and controlled access to the stop. In developing areas, the transit
agency can coordinate bus stop location with sidewalk locations and installation through local
jurisdictions or developers.
"
 
Proper Pedestrian Circulation: Utility poles, fire hydrants, and street furniture can reduce the
available space for bus patrons to maneuver. Avoid locating stops near items that may restrict
proper movement in and around a bus stop.
Appropriate spacing of items at a bus stop should also be maintained to allow proper access for
wheelchairs and pass-by pedestrian traffic. Shelters, benches, utility poles, and other street
furniture should not intrude on the ADA landing pad, which should be at least 5 feet (measured
parallel to the curb) by 8 feet (measured perpendicular from the back face of the curb). At least 3
feet of clearance should be maintained to enable wheelchair access to and from the stop and
around any transit amenities, posts, poles, fire hydrants, vending machines, or other fixtures that
might be present. Ideally, high-volume stops should have clear pedestrian access from both bus
doors.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
Chapter
4
CURB-SIDE PLACEMENT CHECKLIST
92
"
 
Existing Street Furniture: Selecting sites with existing street furniture can save the transit
system money while providing patrons with amenities, such as benches, vending machines, and
phones. The transit agency should review the condition of the amenities to make sure the items
are properly maintained and free of graffiti or other signs of wear. The transit agency should also
note the placement of any existing street furniture. When additional improvements are made to
the site because of the installation of a bus stop, the location of existing street furniture may
reduce circulation space and accessibility.
"
 
Environmental Treatments: Existing site conditions can be used to enhance the environmental
comfort of a bus stop. Sun/shade patterns provided by existing vegetation or structures can
contribute to the comfort of waiting bus patrons. The final design of the bus stop shelter should
also respond to the environmental demands of a site (e.g., sun/shade patterns, winds, and
precipitation). Panel placement, orientation, and materials should be selected to provide
maximum comfort to patrons. The site should also be well drained.
"
 
Security: Perception of security at a bus stop can have a significant influence on the comfort
level of patrons using that bus stop. To enhance the security of bus stops, regularly remove
graffiti and trash (to discourage repeat occurrences), ensure indirect surveillance from nearby
land uses and passing traffic, and avoid locating stops where there is opportunity for
concealment. When landscaping is involved, use low-growing shrubs that preserve sight lines.
"
 
Lighting: Bus stops may include lighting or be located near existing street lights that provide
indirect lighting to enhance the security of a stop. Interior shelter lighting can be a critical
amenity when patrons arrive and return in the dark. The interior lighting elements should be
resistant to vandalism and be maintained regularly. Bus shelters without interior lights should,
whenever possible, have translucent roofs.
Pedestrian-oriented lighting should be encouraged in new developments or when major
infrastructure work is being planned. Indirect lighting from nearby businesses can also enhance
surveillance of the site from these land uses.
background image
CURB-SIDE FACTORS
CURB-SIDE PLACEMENT CHECKLIST
Chapter
4
93
"
 
Sight Line: The bus stop should be clearly visible for both safety and security reasons. Stops
obscured by existing structures or vegetation are difficult for bus drivers to see. Passing vehicles
may be unaware of the presence of pedestrians near or on the roadways; this increases the chance
that accidents will occur. Right turns on red can increase the likelihood of pedestrian-vehicle
conflicts. The bus stop site should be inspected carefully to detect any potential sight-related
problems.
For security reasons, sight lines should be preserved to maintain direct and indirect surveillance
of the bus stop. Landscaping, walls, advertising panels, and structures can restrict sight lines and
provide spaces to hide. Bus stops should be easily viewed from nearby land uses and passing
traffic to enhance the security of the stop. Bus shelters should be constructed of materials that
allow clear, unobstructed visibility of patrons waiting inside. Bus patrons also need to be able to
observe their surroundings when inside the shelter.
"
 
Maintenance: Proper maintenance of bus facilities is crucial to preserving a positive image of a
transit system. Trash and graffiti should be removed as soon as possible to prevent further
degradation of the facilities. A database containing maintenance schedules can be created to track
the condition of the facilities, including pavement surface conditions; age of the facilities; history
of damage; and condition of shelter, benches, or other transit amenities.
Bus stop maintenance can be costly and time-consuming. Working agreements with local
businesses or commercial centers can reduce the financial responsibilities of the transit agency.
For stops next to convenience stores, the transit agency should try to obtain a working agreement
with the local store or businesses to provide trash removal and general maintenance at the bus
stop. This should include snow removal.
Agreements with commercial-strip centers should also be obtained to remove used shopping
carts from a bus stop regularly. Shopping carts abandoned around bus stops are visually
unappealing and restrict movement through a site.
background image
This page left intentionally blank.
background image
GLOSSARY
TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
Chapter
5
95
accessway - a paved connection, preferably non-slip concrete or asphalt, that connects the bus stop
waiting pad with the back face of the curb.
adaptive use - an individual's spontaneous, creative use of a facility or structure in ways that differ
from or go beyond the intended use or the formal design.
advertising shelter - a bus shelter that is installed by an advertising agency for the purpose of
obtaining a high-visibility location for advertisements. By agreement, the bus shelter conforms to the
transit agency specifications but is maintained by the advertising company.
ADA - American's with Disabilities Act of 1990. The Act supplants a patchwork of previous
accessibility and barrier-free legislation with a comprehensive set of requirements and guidelines for
providing reasonable access to and use of building, facilities, and transportation.
amenities - things that provide or increase comfort or convenience.
bollards - a concrete or metal post placed into the ground behind a bus shelter to protect the bus
shelter from vehicular damage.
bus bay - a specially constructed area off the normal roadway section for bus loading and unloading.
bus stop spacing - the distance between consecutive stops.
bus stop zone length - the length of a roadway marked or signed as available for use by a bus loading
or unloading passengers.
curb-side factors - factors that are located off the roadway that affect patron comfort, convenience,
and safety.
curb-side stop - a bus stop in the travel lane immediately adjacent to the curb.
detector - a device that measures the presence of vehicles on a roadway.
discontinuous sidewalk - a sidewalk that is constructed to connect the bus stop with the nearest
intersection. The sidewalk does not extend beyond the bus stop.
background image
GLOSSARY
Chapter
5
TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
96
downstream - in the direction of traffic.
dwell time - the time a bus spends at a stop, measured as the interval between its stopping and
starting.
far-side stop - a bus stop located immediately after an intersection.
headway - the interval between the passing of the front ends of successive buses moving along the
same lane in the same direction, usually expressed in minutes.
layover - time built into a schedule between arrivals and departures, used for the recovery of delays
and preparation for the return trip.
midblock stop - a bus stop within the block.
near-side stop - a bus stop located immediately before an intersection.
nub - a stop where the sidewalk is extended into the parking lane, which allows the bus to pick up
passengers without leaving the travel lane, also known as bus bulbs or curb extensions.
open bus bay - a bus bay designed with bay "open" to the upstream intersection.
queue jumper bus bay - a bus bay designed to provide priority treatment for buses, allowing them to
use right-turn lanes to bypass queued traffic at congested intersections and access a far-side open bus
bay.
queue jumper lane - right-turn lane upstream of an intersection that a bus can use to bypass queue
traffic at a signal.
roadway geometry - the proportioning of the physical elements of a roadway, such as vertical and
horizontal curves, lane widths, cross sections, and bus bays.
shelter - a curb-side amenity designed to provide protection and relief from the elements and a place
to sit while patrons wait for the bus.
sight distance - the portion of the highway environment visible to the driver.
street-side factors - factors associated with the roadway that influence bus operations.
background image
GLOSSARY
TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
Chapter
5
97
TCRP - Transit Cooperative Research Program of the Transportation Research Board.
upstream - toward the source of traffic.
waiting or accessory pad - a paved area that is provided for bus patrons and may contain a bench or
shelter.
background image
This page left intentionally blank.
background image
99
APPENDIXES A-C
Appendixes A through C as submitted by the research agency are not published herein, but are
available for loan on request to the TCRP.
Appendix A - Literature Search
Appendix B - Review of Transit Agencies' Manuals
Appendix C - Survey Findings

Document Outline