background image
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 2
 
 
Table of Contents 
 
Executive Summary ......................................................................................................... 3
 
Chapter 1. Introduction................................................................................................... 12
 
1A. Purpose and Background..................................................................................... 12
 
1B. Current Funding Sources for Transportation Services......................................... 17
 
1C. Plan Approach and Development ........................................................................ 27
 
Chapter 2. Hawaii County .............................................................................................. 31
 
2A. Community Profile................................................................................................ 31
 
2B. Existing Transportation Services.......................................................................... 41
 
2C. Transportation Needs Assessment...................................................................... 49
 
2D. Strategies for Improved Service and Coordination .............................................. 55
 
Chapter 3: Kaua?i County ............................................................................................... 60
 
3A. Community Profile................................................................................................ 60
 
3B. Existing Transportation Services.......................................................................... 68
 
3C. Transportation Needs Assessment...................................................................... 79
 
3D. Strategies for Improved Service and Coordination .............................................. 87
 
Chapter 4. Maui County ................................................................................................. 94
 
4A. Community Profile................................................................................................ 94
 
4B. Existing Transportation Service ......................................................................... 103
 
4C. Transportation Needs Assessment.................................................................... 110
 
4D. Strategies for Improved Service and Coordination ............................................ 116
 
Chapter 5: Next Steps and Recommendations............................................................ 120
 
Appendix A: Transportation Inventory........................................................................ 1204
 
Appendix B: Public Meeting Participants ..................................................................... 140
 
Appendix C: Provider Workshop Participants .............................................................. 148
 
Appendix D: Hawaii Statewide Transportation Plan Goals and Objectives ................. 149
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 3
 
 
 
Director?s Message 
 
 
Today?s transportation challenges transcend all levels of 
government. Addressing the needs and priority concerns 
require focused examination of such important matters such 
as: multi-modal transportation systems to ensure seamless 
inter-modal connections within and between modes, people 
movement that accommodates bicycling and pedestrians, 
preservation of the environment in the creation and 
operation of transportation facilities, and supporting a 
sustainable lifestyle in response to forecasted changes.  
The  expectation of responsibility now entails?to a greater 
and greater degree?understanding statewide goals for job 
development, clean energy, food self-sufficiency, and tracking the demographics of our 
population for responses to the growing number of those who must make regular or 
special arrangements when establishing their personal mobility. We need to look at 
these challenges not as problems, but opportunities to build upon. 
 
This Coordination Plan focuses and presents opportunities to address the transportation 
needs of Hawaii residents in the greatest need of services to support their mobility ? 
older adults, people with disabilities and low-income families and individuals. It is a 
guiding document to be used by local communities in the interest of leveraging federal 
funds to fill gaps in service through the coordination of local agencies. 
 
This Plan will also be used in coordination with other transportation plans developed by 
the State of Hawaii and the Counties of Hawaii, Kauai and Maui. We look forward to the 
innovations made possible by bringing together individuals, agencies, and organizations 
committed to enhancing the mobility of older adults, people with disabilities and 
economically disadvantaged families and individuals. 
 
Mahalo, 
 
 
Glenn M. Okimoto, Ph.D. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 4
 
 
 
Executive Summary 
 
 
Background 
This Coordinated Public Transit Human Services Transportation Plan (CSP) for the 
State of Hawaii is sponsored by the Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) and 
is intended to provide direction to improve transportation statewide for: 
?  Individuals with disabilities 
?  Older adults 
?  Low-income individuals 
Plans like this are required by federal law, the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient 
Transportation Equity Act or ?SAFETEA-LU? [PL 109-59], which was signed into law in 
August 2005. It authorized $52.6 billion for federal community transportation programs 
over six years, which is available to fund projects consistent with the strategies 
identified in local coordination plans. These three funding programs, administered by 
the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), are the statewide Formula Program for Elderly 
Individuals and Individual with Disabilities (Section 5310) and the small urban and rural 
Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC, Section 5316) and New Freedom (Section 
5317) programs. 
As described further in this report, federal planning requirements specify that 
designated recipients of these sources of funds must certify that projects funded with 
those federal dollars are derived from a coordinated plan. HDOT serves as the 
designated recipient for the funds described above. This plan focuses on the Counties 
of Hawaii, Kaua?i and Maui.
1
 The City and County of Honolulu has developed a plan for 
Oahu, approved in 2009, which was developed in coordination with HDOT. These 
projects are intended to improve the mobility of individuals with disabilities, older adults, 
and people with limited incomes.  
 
 
                                            
1
 The term ?non-urbanized area? includes rural areas and urban areas under 50,000 in 
population not included in an urbanized area. The City and County of Honolulu, designated 
recipient of these funds for urban areas, developed a separate plan for the island of Oahu in 
2009 and is currently implementing projects aligned with their top priority strategies. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 5
 
This federal guidance specifies four required elements of the plan, as follows:  
1.  Transportation Providers ? An assessment of available services that identifies 
current transportation providers (public, private, and nonprofit);  
2.  Needs Assessment Process and Results ? An assessment of transportation 
needs for individuals with disabilities, older adults, and people with low incomes. 
This assessment can be based on the experiences and perceptions of the 
planning partners or on more sophisticated data collection efforts, and gaps in 
service; 
3.  Strategy Development ? Strategies, activities, and/or projects to address the 
identified gaps between current services and needs, as well as opportunities to 
achieve efficiencies in service delivery; and  
4.  Priorities ? Priorities for implementation based on resources (from multiple 
program sources), time, and feasibility for implementing specific strategies and/or 
activities. 
Furthermore, across the nation, there is a growing movement towards building 
sustainable communities, aging in place, walkability and mobility. Recognizing that 
resources are scarce and our population is aging, governments and their communities 
are trying to leverage resources, coordinate services, and invest in an accessible future 
that provides mobility for everybody.  
Transportation Funding 
Funding for the various transportation services is complex. Public transit and human 
service transportation programs are funded by a variety of federal, state and local 
dollars, as well as money from private foundations and grants.  In fact, in 2003, the 
United States General Accounting Office (GAO) identified 62 federal programs 
administered by eight federal agencies that provided an estimated $2.4 billion in 
transportation services for older adults, individuals with disabilities, and persons with 
low incomes. 
General transit services, as well as complementary Americans with Disabilities Act 
(ADA) paratransit and other specialized transportation services, are provided by public 
transit agencies. In addition, many communities offer specialized transportation through 
senior centers and other human service agencies to help people access senior nutrition 
sites, employment, medical appointments and more.   
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 6
 
The sources for transportation funding within each county in the State of Hawaii include: 
?  County General Funds, Federal Transit Administration formula grants for non-
urbanized areas (Section 5311): General transit and paratransit services  
?  Administration on Aging (Older Americans Act), State of Hawaii Department of 
Health Executive Office on Aging, and Federal Transit Administration (Sections 
5310,  5317): Seniors and disability transportation   
?  State of Hawaii Department of Human Services, Benefits, Employment and 
Support Services Divisions (BESSD), and Federal Transit Administration 
(Section 5316): Employment transportation 
?  State of Hawaii Department of Human Services, Med-Quest Program: Medical 
transportation 
?  Federal Funding: The State of Hawaii serves as the designated recipient for 
5310, 5316 and 5317 funds for the rural and small urban portions of the State. 
This means that the state is required to select projects for use of these funds 
through a competitive process, and to certify that projects funded are derived 
from the coordinated plan.  
Project Stakeholder Consultation 
Transportation coordination efforts will be most successful when federal, state and local 
policies all work together to support these efforts. Promoting coordination between 
decision-makers at the state and local level, this project developed new workgroups to 
guide the planning process and integrate state and local priorities.  
A single State Mobility Workgroup was initiated to design selection criteria for 
distribution of federal funds. In addition, Local Mobility Workgroups were established in 
each county with the purpose of prioritizing transportation needs and gaps, as well as 
developing coordinated strategies that respond to those needs and gaps.  
The general public and other key stakeholders were also invited to play active roles 
throughout the planning process. Methods of engagement included stakeholder 
interviews, public meetings, accessible website with public input form, press releases 
about public input opportunities, newsletter articles for social service providers, flyers 
and information sheets, email and direct mail public meeting invites, and needs review 
surveys. 
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 7
 
Transportation Providers  
Through the Local Mobility Workgroups and the public input processes described 
above, the major public transit and human service transportation providers in Hawaii, 
Kaua?i, and Maui Counties were identified.   
Transportation in the County of Hawaii (the Big Island) is provided primarily by the 
Hawaii County Department of Mass Transit?s Hele-On Bus, which offers regular fixed 
route and commuter bus service throughout the county, as well as a subsidized shared 
ride taxi service in the Hilo and Kona areas. Curb-to-curb paratransit service is also 
provided through a contract with Hawaii County Economic Opportunity Council.  
Another major provider, Hawaii County Parks and Recreation Coordinated Services for 
the Elderly, offers information and referral services as well as direct transportation for 
seniors to access nutrition sites and for people with disabilities under 60 years old to 
access various needs on a priority basis. Six additional non-profit agency providers 
were also identified, which provide limited transportation services that are typically 
designed to serve their own programs and clientele. 
Transportation services provided in the County of Kaua?i are largely the responsibility 
of one entity, the County of Kaua?i Transportation Agency (or CTA). CTA provides both 
fixed-route (?The Kaua?i Bus?) and Paratransit services, in addition to Kupuna Care 
(senior transportation through a contract with the County Office on Aging) and some 
agency subscription services. Besides the fixed-route and paratransit service provided 
by CTA, very limited accessible/affordable transportation is available. A small number of 
agencies provide transportation to their clients. A few private providers offer demand 
response service, and very limited volunteer service is available, primarily for veterans 
to access VA medical appointments. 
The County of Maui Department of Transportation (MDOT) is responsible for the vast 
majority of transportation services in the County of Maui. MDOT administers Maui Bus, 
which was created in 2002 to provide an island-wide public transportation system on 
Maui. MDOT also operates the curb-to-curb ADA complementary paratransit service 
and provides funding for a variety of other specialized services, including youth 
transportation and access to senior nutrition sites, through contracts with Maui 
Economic Opportunities (MEO). Three additional non-profit agency providers were 
identified, primarily providing program-related services. The County of Maui also funds 
transportation programs on Molokai and Lanai through its contract with MEO. Service 
focuses on seniors or persons with disabilities, although there is rural shuttle service 
available to the general public and a youth shuttle on Molokai. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 8
 
Detailed information about each of these programs is provided in Appendix A of this 
Plan as well as online at findtherightride.org, a tool jointly funded by the City and County 
of Honolulu and the State of Hawaii.  
Needs Assessment Process and Results 
A key step of this planning project was to define and prioritize the transportation needs 
and gaps in transportation services for older adults, people with disabilities and low-
income residents in each of the counties. A long list of needs was initially developed 
through interviews with transportation and human service providers that serve these 
populations. These lists were organized into categories of needs and presented to the 
public in open public meetings. During the public meetings, these lists were refined and 
prioritized by the participants using electronic polling. 
For the Big Island, the top priority needs categories were identified as: 
Service/Assistance, Capacity/Infrastructure and Coordination. The top service and 
assistance needs included more door-to-door transportation and information about 
transportation options as well as how to use public transit. The top capacity and 
infrastructure needs were newer and more small, lift-equipped vehicles. The top 
coordination needs were identified as the ability to coordinate schedules among various 
providers, as well as identification of a lead agency to help with this and other 
coordination needs. 
For Kaua?i, the top priority categories were Service, Infrastructure and Assistance 
needs. The top service needs were identified as providing evening and Sunday service. 
However, the County responded quickly to these needs and has since added transit 
service in the evenings and on Sundays. The top infrastructure needs were considered 
sidewalk safety and provision of more bike lanes. The top assistance need was 
information about available transportation options as well as how to use public transit. 
For Maui, the top priority categories were Service/Assistance, Training and Human 
Service Transportation Coordination needs. The top service and assistance needs were 
affordability and service to outlying areas. The top training need was driver training in 
general, including some type of accountability system for the drivers. The top 
coordination needs identified at the Maui public meeting were establishing multimodal 
transportation to connect people living on each of the islands in the county and 
coordination of federal funding. However, these coordination issues were determined to 
be a lower priority during the transportation provider workshops held later in the year. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 9
 
A Needs Review Survey for each county was distributed by mail and email to public 
meeting participants and various transportation and social service agencies to distribute 
to their clients. (A copy of the survey is included in Appendix E.) In general, the survey 
results in all three counties concurred with the identified needs and priorities. 
Strategy Development  
Strategies were initially developed by the consultant team based on stakeholder 
interviews, public meetings, local mobility workgroup input, and past experience in 
working on projects of similar scope. A local provider workshop was held in each of the 
counties. Participants included Local Mobility Workgroup members as well as other 
transportation and social service providers. Participants methodically reviewed each of 
the proposed strategies, deleting some, adding some and editing others to ensure that 
they were appropriate strategies for each county. 
Priorities 
During the same local provider workshop as described above, workshop participants 
prioritized the strategies through a facilitated discussion, using consensus-based 
decision-making. Strategies were sorted into four categories, A-D, according to their 
priority, with A being the top priority category.  
In order to prioritize the strategies, workshop participants considered each strategy in 
terms of four criteria, developed by the consultants based on prior experience with 
transportation coordination planning: 
?  The number  and priority of needs that could be met;  
?  The financial feasibility of the strategy;  
?  The feasibility of implementation; and  
?  The involvement of coordination, partnerships and potential community support.  
These criteria were important to use in order to identify strategies that would meet the 
most critical needs, use resources efficiently and effectively and be feasible to 
implement in the near future. Strategies to meet some top priority needs were 
determined to be unfeasible at this time, and were ranked lower as a result. 
The top priority strategies (Category A) on the Big Island included: 
?  Develop a countywide vehicle replacement program 
?  Establish a mobility manager position 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 10
 
?  Develop a transportation financial plan in order to enhance and expand the 
specialized transportation provided throughout the county 
The top priority strategies on Kaua?i included: 
?  Purchase accessible taxis  
?  Develop a subsidized taxi voucher program  
?  Access funding for free or reduced bus passes 
The top priority strategies for Maui included: 
?  Establish a lead agency for human service transportation coordination 
?  Develop bus stops or transfer points between the Maui Bus and human service 
agencies to promote better coordination 
?  Coordinate training between the various transportation providers in the county 
Workshop participants considered issues for all three islands in Maui County. Two of 
the top three strategies should apply to Molokai and Lanai as well as the island of Maui.  
Next Steps and Recommendations 
The State Mobility Workgroup has identified a statewide selection process. The process 
considers geographic diversity, acknowledges local priorities and funds a variety of 
projects. State funding priorities include expanding/improving service operation, 
replacing/expanding vehicles or other capital infrastructure and establishing mobility 
management services. The selection committee will be transparent in their selection 
process and ensure no conflicts of interest. Providers will be notified of opportunities to 
apply for funds, and applications will be made available at 
http://hawaii.gov/dot/administration/stp/fta-grant
Funds available each year are limited; not all needs can be met. Counties should be 
strategic in seeking funds for projects. It is recommended that counties institutionalize 
their Local Mobility Workgroups and utilize these workgroups to develop viable projects 
according to local priorities. It is also recommended that counties work together to be 
strategic in their applications for funds. It would be beneficial for the state to facilitate 
this process. 
Finally, it is recommended that the state provide technical support to the counties in this 
work, lead efforts to coordinate with state agencies that fund human service 
transportation and establish funding mechanisms for on-going needs assessments. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 11
 
Additional funding is needed in order to enable HDOT to provide this type of leadership 
and support for coordination. 
Reading the Plan 
Chapter 1 provides the purpose and background of the Coordinated Public Transit-
Human Services Transportation Plan (CSP), as well as the federal planning 
requirements established under the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and Efficient 
Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). This chapter presents 
information on federal and state roles in funding of public transit operators and human 
service transportation providers.  
Chapter 1 also includes the methodology used to develop the plan, including the use of 
state and local mobility workgroups and their roles, the studies and documents 
supporting development of the plan, and the public involvement process.  
Chapters 2, 3 and 4 cover the community and transportation profiles for the counties of 
Hawaii, Kaua?i and Maui. This includes demographic trends, travel patterns for key 
demographic and activity centers and a detailed description of existing transportation 
services. The chapters also cover the unmet transportation needs and service gaps in 
each county, and the prioritized strategies for addressing the most critical transportation 
needs. Appendix A provides an inventory of existing public transportation services, 
including fixed-route and paratransit services, and services supported by social service 
agencies and other private providers. 
Chapter 5 completes the CSP by establishing an implementation plan for allocating 
federal resources from multiple program sources, including the competitive selection 
process for FTA Sections 5310, 5316, and 5317 funds. It also includes consultant 
recommendations for next steps for implementing local strategies. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 12
 
 
Chapter 1. Introduction  
1A. Purpose and Background 
 
Purpose 
Many residents of all counties in Hawaii currently need specialized transportation 
services. Even more are likely to need such services 
in the future.  When this happens, it is essential that 
a public infrastructure be available to provide 
transportation in the most cost effective manner 
possible.  
Access to work, education, shopping, medical care, 
nutrition, social services, cultural and social events, 
and everyday activities is critical to a vital, active and 
productive life. 
The State of Hawaii Coordinated Public Transit?
Human Services Transportation Plan (CSP) provides a strategic direction for improved, 
accessible transportation in Hawaii, Kaua?i, and Maui counties for:  
?  individuals with disabilities  
?  older adults 
?  economically disadvantaged individuals  
The planning process brought together public transit, social service, non-profit agencies, 
transportation providers, and other community organizations. Together, these agencies 
and the people they serve identified and prioritized the transportation gaps and needs in 
Hawaii, Kaua?i, and Maui counties. After reviewing the existing transportation services 
currently available, as well as existing needs and gaps, the plan participants developed 
a prioritized list of coordinated strategies intended to address the most critical 
transportation needs.   
This coordinated plan is intended as a strategic planning tool that will position the 
Counties of Hawaii, Kaua?i, and Maui to enhance coordination of existing transportation 
services, and ensure eligibility for federal and other funding opportunities that support 
improved mobility.  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 13
 
 
Coordination: Desired and Required 
Coordinated transportation strategies can enhance access, minimize duplication of 
services, and facilitate cost-effective solutions using existing resources.  
For the rural counties of the State of Hawaii, coordinating transportation services is not 
an option ? it?s a survival technique. As a result, 
the transportation providers on Hawaii, Kaua?i 
and Maui have been coordinating services with 
human service providers in their counties for 
many years, on both an informal and a formal 
basis.  
Oftentimes, transit, human service agencies, and 
other community organizations provide special 
transportation services exclusively within the 
context of their individual programmatic and functional areas. This is largely driven by 
the specific requirements of the funding sources, which may limit the provision of 
services to a specific clientele, or for a specific type of trip. In 2003, the United States 
General Accounting Office (GAO) identified 62 federal programs administered by eight 
federal agencies that provided an estimated $2.4 billion in transportation services for 
older adults, individuals with disabilities, and persons with low incomes.  
Recognizing that efficiencies could be found if all of these disparate transportation 
programs were better coordinated, legislation was passed requiring local coordinated 
transportation plans to be in place before states are eligible for certain federal funds. 
SAFETEA-LU Planning Requirements 
The Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act or ?SAFETEA-LU? 
[PL 109-59] was signed into law in August 2005. It authorized $52.6 billion for federal 
community transportation programs over six years. Beginning in federal Fiscal Year 
2007, projects funded through three programs in SAFETEA-LU ? the Formula Program 
for Elderly Individuals and Individual with Disabilities (Section 5310), the Job Access 
and Reverse Commute Program (JARC, Section 5316), and New Freedom (Section 
5317) ? must be part of a locally developed, coordinated public transit-human services 
transportation plan (CSP). A more thorough description of these funding sources is 
outlined in Section 1B of this chapter. 
For the rural counties of the 
State of Hawaii, coordinating 
transportation services is  
not an option ? it?s a  
survival technique. 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 14
 
SAFETEA-LU guidance issued by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) states that 
the plan should be a ?unified, comprehensive strategy for public transportation service 
delivery that identifies the transportation needs of individuals with disabilities, older 
adults, and individuals with limited income, laying out strategies for meeting these 
needs, and prioritizing services.?
2
   
The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has issued three program circulars to provide 
guidance on the administration of the three programs that are subject to this planning 
requirement. These circulars can be accessed through the following websites:  
Elderly Individuals and Individuals with Disabilities (5310): 
http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/C9070.1F(1).doc 
Job Access and Reverse Commute (5316): 
http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/FTA_C_9050.1_JARC.pdf 
New Freedom Program (5317): 
http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/FTA_C_9045.1_New_Freedom.pdf 
Federal guidance specifies four required elements of the plan: 
?  An assessment of available services that identifies current transportation 
providers (public, private, and non-profit). 
 
?  An assessment of transportation needs for individuals with disabilities, older 
adults and people with low incomes. This assessment can be based on the 
experiences and perceptions of the planning partners or on more sophisticated 
data collection efforts, and gaps in service. 
 
?  Strategies, activities, and/or projects to address the identified gaps between 
current services and needs, as well as opportunities to achieve efficiencies in 
service delivery. 
 
?  Priorities for implementation based on resources (from multiple program 
sources), time, and feasibility for implementing specific strategies and/or 
activities. 
The State of Hawaii serves as the designated recipient for FTA Sections 5316 and 5317 
funds for the rural and small urban portions of the State, including the outer islands. It is 
also the direct recipient for all FTA Section 5310 funds for the state. This means the 
                                            
2
 Federal Register: March 15, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 50, page 13458) 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 15
 
state is required to certify that projects which are funded using SAFETEA-LU funds are 
done so as result of the coordinated plan.
3
 
In July of 2008, the State of Hawaii adopted its first Human Services Transportation 
Coordination Plan. The original plan and this update were prepared in accordance with 
the general guidelines described in the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Circulars 
9070.1F, 9045.1 and 9050.1.  
Federal Coordination Efforts 
The requirements of SAFETEA-LU build upon previous federal initiatives to enhance 
human service transportation coordination. Among these are: 
?  Presidential Executive Order:  Signed in February 2004, this Executive Order 
established an Interagency Transportation Coordinating Council on Access and 
Mobility to focus 10 federal agencies on the coordination agenda. The executive 
order may be found at http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2004/pdf/04-4451.pdf 
 
?  A Framework for Action:  This self-assessment tool was designed for states 
and communities to identify areas of success and highlight what actions are still 
needed to improve the coordination of human service transportation. This tool 
has been developed through the United We Ride initiative sponsored by FTA, 
and can be found on FTA?s website:  
http://www.unitedweride.gov/1_81_ENG_HTML.htm. 
 
?  Previous research:  Numerous studies and reports have documented the 
benefits of coordinated federal programs that fund or sponsor transportation for 
their clients.
4
 
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) plays an important role in coordination 
efforts, as individuals with disabilities are among the populations that these planning 
efforts are intended to help. For people with disabilities who cannot independently use 
                                            
3
 The City and County of Honolulu is the designated recipient of the funds for the urban areas of 
Oahu. 
 
4
 Examples include United States General Accounting Office (GAO) reports to Congress entitled 
Transportation Disadvantaged Populations, Some Coordination Efforts Among Programs 
Providing Transportation, but Obstacles Persist, (June 2003) and Transportation Disadvantaged 
Seniors?Efforts to Enhance Senior Mobility Could Benefit From Additional Guidance and 
Information, (August 2004). 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 16
 
the fixed-route bus service, even with accommodations, transit agencies that provide 
fixed route services are required by the ADA to provide paratransit services that are 
complementary to those fixed routes.  
Although each paratransit provider has unique service characteristics, ADA paratransit 
services are available for any purpose, and there is no limit on the number of trips an 
ADA-eligible person may take. Often the service level is ?curb-to-curb? meaning the 
passenger is picked up and dropped off at the curb. Assistance is not provided to and 
from the pickup and drop off locations. 
The intent of ADA paratransit services is to provide a service that is complementary to 
the fixed route bus services. This means, for example, that paratransit service is 
provided where the fixed route service operates, and during the same hours of service. 
ADA paratransit service is required to meet the following service standards: 
?  Paratransit service is provided the same days and times that the fixed route 
operates. 
?  Service is to be provided within ? mile of existing fixed route bus routes 
(excluding commuter service). 
?  The passenger cannot be required to pay more than twice the regular fare as 
on the fixed route service. 
?  Basic service standards may be established as origin to destination. 
?  A transit operator is not allowed to turn down or deny trips?any trip purpose 
is considered eligible. 
?  A transit operator is allowed to ?negotiate? the time the trip is delivered up to 
an hour before or after the trip is requested. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 17
 
 
1B. Current Funding Sources for Transportation Services 
Transportation funding is complex. Public transit and human service transportation 
programs are funded by a variety of federal, state and local dollars, as well as money 
from private foundations and grants. This section provides a broad overview of the 
varied transportation funding sources utilized by the Counties of Hawaii, Kaua?i and 
Maui. 
Transportation funding typically falls under the umbrella of general public transit and 
related complementary Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) paratransit services, older 
adult transportation, medical transportation or access to employment-related services. 
Of the 62 federal programs administered by eight federal agencies, seventy percent or 
$1.7 billion is distributed through the federal Department of Health and Human Services, 
as illustrated in Figure 1-1.  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 18
 
 
Figure 1-1: Estimated Spending on Transportation Services by Identified Agencies
5
 
 
The sources for transportation funding within each county in the State of Hawaii include: 
?  County General Funds, Federal Transit Administration formula grants for non-
urbanized areas (Section 5311): General transit and paratransit services  
?  Administration on Aging (Older Americans Act) and State of Hawaii Department 
of Health Executive Office on Aging, and Federal Transit Administration 
(Sections 5310,  5317): Seniors and disability transportation   
?  Hawaii Department of Human Services, Benefits, Employment and Support 
Services Divisions (BESSD), and Federal Transit Administration (Section 5316): 
Employment transportation 
?  State of Hawaii Department of Human Services, Med-Quest Program: Medical 
transportation 
                                            
5
 
Department of Transportation spending does not include FTA Section 5311 dollars. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 19
 
Different funding programs have different matching dollar requirements, different 
reporting requirements, and different service and eligibility requirements. This can make 
it challenging to coordinate transportation services. 
Primary transit and human service transportation funding sources for each county for 
Fiscal Year 2011 are illustrated below in Figure 1-2.  
Figure 1-2:  Major Transportation Funding Sources FY 2011 
 
Hawaii 
Kaua?i 
Maui 
Local Funds 
 
 
 
County General Fund  
$4,107,000 
$4,082,000 
$7,598,000 
Transit Farebox Revenue 
$0 
$346,000 
$1,200,000 
Other Local Sources 
$260,000 
 
 
Federal Transit Administration Funds 
 
 
 
FTA 5311 
$582,000 
$582,000 
$565,000 
Other State and Federal Funds 
 
 
 
Department of Labor & Industries 
 
$2,400
6
 
 
Area Agency on Aging/Older Americans Act 
$37,000 
$126,000
7
 
 
TOTAL 
$4,986,000 
$5,138,400 
$9,363,000 
 
 
                                            
6
 
These funds represent funding for bus passes provided by Kauai Economic Opportunity. 
7
 
These funds represent the County of Kaua?i Elderly Affairs Division only. Wilcox Adult Day 
Health also uses OAA funds, but the amount is unknown. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 20
 
As shown in Figure 1-3, the vast majority of funding for public transit in the Counties of 
Hawaii, Kaua?i and Maui is derived from the counties themselves. 
Figure 1-3: Public Transit Funding Sources ? Hawaii, Kaua?i and Maui Counties 
Combined 
 
Following is a brief overview of major transportation funding sources. Because the 
funding arena is complex and varied, this section is not intended to identify all potential 
sources, but rather to identify the major funding sources for public transit and human 
service transportation in the three counties that are the focus of the coordinated plan.
8
  
Local Funding   
The public transit fixed-route and paratransit services in Hawaii, Kaua?i, and Maui are 
provided through each county?s transportation agency. The primary local funding source 
for public transit is derived from property taxes in the general fund.  
Fixed route transit operators
9
 are obligated under the American with Disabilities Act 
(ADA) to provide complementary paratransit service for individuals with disabilities who 
cannot use the fixed route system, and to provide such services consistent with service 
criteria established through federal regulations.  
                                            
8
 
For more information on other federal funding sources for transportation, refer to 
?Transportation-Disadvantaged Population,? United States General Accounting Office (2003), 
and the Honolulu ?Paratransit Service Study,? Coordinated Opportunities, Chapter 4 (2006). 
9
 Commute bus routes and Deviated fixed routes are exempt from the requirements to provide 
ADA complementary paratransit 
Local 
91% 
Federal 
9% 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 21
 
In addition to public transit, county monies fund a variety of community transportation 
programs. Figure 1-4 below illustrates the different programs that receive county funds 
for Fiscal Year 2011. 
Figure 1-4: Major Transportation Programs Funded with County Funds 
 
Hawaii 
Kaua?i 
Maui 
Fixed Route 
$5,200,000 
$2,875,000 
$7,022,500 
ADA Paratransit 
N/A 
$1,600,000 
$375,000 
Other Paratransit  
$2,226,000
10
 
$0 
$0 
MEO (Dialysis) 
N/A 
N/A 
$921,905 
MEO (General Fund) 
N/A 
N/A 
$4,532,184 
TOTAL 
$7,426,000 
$4,475,000 
$12,851,589 
Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Funding Programs  
The three sources of FTA funds subject to this plan [JARC (5316), New Freedom 
(5317), and Elderly Individuals and Individuals with Disabilities (5310)] are described 
below. The State of Hawaii serves as the designated recipient for Section 5316 and 
5317 funds for the rural and small urban portions of the State including the neighbor 
islands, and for all statewide 5310 funds. This means that the state is required to select 
projects for use of SAFETEA-LU funds through a competitive process, and to certify that 
projects funded are derived from the coordinated plan.  
Section 5311 FTA funds are not subject to the requirements of this plan. This is a rural 
program that is formula based and provides funding to states for the purpose of 
supporting public transportation in rural areas, with populations of less than 50,000.  
Figure 1-5 provides an estimate of the levels of 5310, 5311, 5316 and 5317 funding 
available for small urbanized and non-urbanized portions of the state from 2006 to 
2010. The annual apportionments combine these two portions, but do not include the 
apportionment from the City and County of Honolulu.
11
  
 
 
 
                                            
10
Includes $880,000 for HCEOC, $1 million for Coordinated Services, and $380,000 from 
County Department of Aging 
11 
The City and County of Honolulu is the designated recipient for all urbanized funds on Oahu.
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 22
 
Figure 1-5: Federal Funding Estimates (2006-2010) for the State of Hawaii  
Federal Fiscal Year 
5310 
5311 
5316 
5317 
2006 
563,249 
1,736,613 
299,046 
172,101 
2007 
585,120 
1,810,778 
169,033 
111,321 
2008 
627,290 
1,942,170 
183,119 
120,255 
2009 
665,421 
2,044,808 
214,934 
138,615 
2010 
657,049 
2,042,259 
205,502 
136,042 
TOTAL 
$ 3,098,129 
$ 9,576,628 
$ 1,071,634 
$ 678,344 
These funds require that a share of total program costs be derived from local sources, 
and may not be matched with other federal Department of Transportation (DOT) funds. 
Projects funded through Sections 5316 or 5317 that support operating costs must 
provide a 50% local match. Capital projects require a 20% local match. Mobility 
management projects are considered ?capital? projects, and are therefore subject to the 
lower match threshold.  
Examples of match funds which may be used for the local share include: 
?  State or local appropriations 
?  Non-DOT federal funds, such as TANF, Older Americans Act 
?  Dedicated tax revenues 
?  Private donations 
?  Revenue from human service contracts 
?  Revenue from advertising and concessions 
?  Non-cash funds such as donations, volunteer services, or in-kind contributions 
are eligible to be counted toward the local match as long as the value of each is 
documented and supported. 
FTA Section 5310 Elderly and Disabled Specialized Transportation Program  
The goal of the 5310 program is to improve mobility for elderly persons and individuals 
with disabilities. FTA makes funds available to support transportation services planned, 
designed and implemented to meet the special transportation needs of these population 
groups. Funds for this program are allocated by a population-based formula to each 
state for the capital costs of providing services to older adults and individuals with 
disabilities. Typically, vans, small buses, and equipment are available to support non-
profit transportation providers. In the State of Hawaii, 5310 funds are used exclusively 
for the purchase of vehicles. 5310 funds pay for up to 80% of capital costs.  
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 23
 
Examples of eligible 5310 projects include:  
?  Buses 
?  Vans 
?  Wheelchair lifts and securements 
?  Vehicle rehabilitation, manufacture and overhaul 
?  Preventative maintenance, as defined in the NTD 
FTA Section 5316 Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) Program 
The purpose of the JARC program is to fund local programs that improve access to 
transportation services to employment and employment related activities for welfare 
recipients and eligible low-income individuals. Also included are programs that transport 
residents of urbanized areas and non-urbanized areas to suburban employment 
opportunities. JARC funds are distributed to states on a formula basis, depending on 
the state?s rate of low-income population. This approach differs from previous funding 
cycles, when grants were awarded purely on an ?earmark? basis. As described above, 
JARC funds will pay up to 50% of operating costs and 80% of capital costs. The 
remaining funds are required to be provided through local match sources. 
Examples of eligible JARC projects include:  
?  Late-night and weekend service  
?  Guaranteed ride home programs  
?  Vanpools or shuttle services to improve access to employment or training sites 
?  Expansion of fixed-route service 
?  Car-share or other projects to improve access to autos 
?  Access to child care and training 
?  Mobility management (an eligible capital cost) 
Eligible applicants for JARC funds may include state or local governmental bodies, 
Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), Regional Transportation Planning 
Authorities (RTPAs), Local Transportation Commissions (LTCs), social services 
agencies, tribal governments, private and public transportation operators, and non-profit 
organizations. 
FTA Section 5317 New Freedom Program  
The New Freedom formula grant program aims to provide additional tools to overcome 
existing barriers facing Americans with disabilities who are seeking integration into the 
workforce and full participation in society. Recognizing that the lack of adequate 
transportation is a primary barrier to employment for individuals with disabilities, the 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 24
 
New Freedom Program seeks to reduce barriers to transportation services and expand 
the transportation mobility options beyond the requirements of the Americans with 
Disabilities Act (ADA).  
New Freedom funds are available for capital and operating expenses that support new 
public transportation services and alternatives that are designed to assist individuals 
with disabilities with accessing transportation services, including transportation to and 
from jobs and employment support services. The same match requirements for JARC 
apply for the New Freedom Program.  
Examples of eligible New Freedom Program projects include: 
?  Expansion of paratransit service hours or service area beyond minimal 
requirements  
?  Purchase of accessible taxis or other vehicles 
?  Promotion of accessible ride sharing or vanpool programs 
?  Administration of volunteer programs  
?  Building curb-cuts, providing accessible bus stops  
?  Travel training programs 
Eligible applicants for New Freedom funds may include state or local governmental 
bodies, Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), Regional Transportation Planning 
Authorities (RTPAs), Local Transportation Commissions (LTCs), social services 
agencies, tribal governments, private and public transportation operators, and non-profit 
organizations. 
FTA Section 5311 Formula Grants for Other than Urbanized Areas  
Section 5311 is not subject to this Plan, but it is an important source of funding for local 
transit agencies. It is a rural program that is formula based and provides funding to 
states for the purpose of supporting public transportation in rural areas, with populations 
of less than 50,000. The goals of the non-urbanized formula program are to: 
?  Enhance the access of people in non-urbanized areas to health care, shopping, 
education, employment, public services, and recreation; 
?  Assist in the maintenance, development, improvement, and use of public 
transportation systems in rural and small urban areas; 
?  Encourage and facilitate the most efficient use of all federal funds used to 
provide passenger transportation in non-urbanized areas through the 
coordination of programs and services; 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 25
 
?  Assist in the development and support of intercity bus transportation
12
; and 
?  Provide for the participation of private transportation providers in non-urbanized 
transportation to the maximum extent feasible. 
The Rural Transit Assistant Program (RTAP) and the Tribal Transit Program are 
separate programs funded within the Section 5311 program. The RTAP program 
provides training and other resources for rural transit providers, and the Tribal Transit 
Program provides grants directly to designated Indian Tribes for transportation 
purposes.  
Other Federal and State Funding Sources  
Older Adult Transportation 
The Older Americans Act (OAA) was signed into law in 1965 amidst growing concern 
over older adults? access to health care and their general well-being. The OAA 
established the federal Administration on Aging (AoA) to advocate on behalf of an 
estimated 46 million Americans 60 or older and to implement a range of assistance 
programs for older adults, especially those at risk of losing their independence. 
Transportation is one of many needs of older Americans and is thus a major service 
under the OAA. It provides access to nutrition, medical and other essential services 
required by an aging population. Funds can be used for transportation under several 
sections of the OAA, including Title III (Support and Access Services) and the Home 
and Community-Based Services (HCBS) program. 
Each of the counties has a department that serves as the Area Agency on Aging. The 
Area Agency on Aging receives State funds from the State Executive Office on Aging to 
provide Kupuna Care Transportation. 
Medical Transportation 
The Medicaid program was established in 1965 under Title XIX of the Social Security 
Act (Public Law 89-87). This program is administered by states that receive matching 
federal funds to pay for primary, acute, and long-term care health care services for low-
income individuals. Federal regulation 42 CFR 431.53 requires that a Medicaid State 
Plan must specify that the Medicaid agency will ensure necessary transportation for 
recipients to and from providers.  
                                            
12
 
Certification has been made that the State of Hawaii intercity bus service is being adequately met. Due 
to the island nature of the state, connectivity is not possible between the islands. County transit agencies 
in the nonurbanized areas of the state have certified that their intercity bus needs have been adequately 
met. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 26
 
 
State Medicaid programs pay for non-emergency transportation for their recipients in 
accordance with their State Plan or waiver as approved by the Centers for Medicare & 
Medicaid Services. The type of non-emergency transportation covered typically includes 
bus passes, paratransit trips, mileage reimbursements, and cab rides.  
 
The State of Hawaii has two main Medicaid managed care programs: 1) QUEST for 
those younger than 65 and not blind or disabled; and 2) QUEST Expanded Access 
(QExA) for individuals age 65 or older, or blind or disabled (ABD). Most of the ground 
non-emergency transportation was utilized by the ABD recipients, which had been 
poorly managed in the fee-for-service program prior to QExA. With the implementation 
of QExA, the contracted health plans are beginning to reduce inappropriate and 
inefficient utilization.  
Employment Related Transportation 
The Benefits, Employment and Support Services Division (BESSD) of the Hawaii 
Department of Human Services provides financial and other support to low-income 
residents in the State of Hawaii. The First-to-Work (FTW) program, implemented in FY 
1997, is designed to assist able-bodied adults to become attached to the workforce. 
FTW serves Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) recipients and 
emphasizes employment, skill-building, training, on-the-job training, and job search 
activities. FTW also provides supportive services such as childcare, transportation 
reimbursement, and work-related expenses for qualifying participants.  
These supportive services are designed to remove barriers to getting and keeping a job. 
Transportation has been identified as a major barrier to employment. The FTW program 
of BESSD provides bus passes, mileage reimbursements, employer transportation 
reimbursements, and assistance in purchasing personal vehicles to mitigate the 
transportation barriers for qualifying program participants.  
Some employment related funds are also available through the state Department of 
Labor and Industrial Relations, which is responsible for ensuring and increasing the 
economic security, well-being, and productivity of Hawaii?s workers. They are not a 
major funder, though there is some history of them providing transportation dollars. For 
instance, Kaua?i Economic Opportunity receives these funds in order to provide bus 
passes to program participants to assist in accessing jobs or job training opportunities. 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 27
 
 
1C. Plan Approach and Development 
In addition to complying with the FTA regulations (see section 1A.), this plan 
emphasizes three planning principles:  leveraging existing plans and studies, 
developing an integrated state and local decision making process, and ensuring an 
inclusive public input process. 
Leverage Existing Plans and Studies 
This Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan is a sub element 
of the Hawaii Statewide Transportation Plan (HSTP). The HSTP is a policy document 
that establishes the framework to be used in the planning of Hawaii's transportation 
system. The goals and objectives identified in the HSTP provide the keys to the 
development of an integrated, multi-modal transportation system for the safe, efficient 
and effective movement of people and goods throughout Hawaii.  
The goals and objectives of the HSTP were adopted as the overarching goals and 
objectives for this planning effort as well. The HSTP can be found at: 
http://www.hawaiistatewidetransplan.com/. 
This plan also leveraged the work of existing local plans and documents, including: 
?  Kaua?i Senior Information and Resource Directory (2008-2009) 
?  Kaua?i County Transportation Agency:  Annual Reports (2007 ? 2009) 
?  Hawaii Department of Transportation, Coordinated Public Transit-Human 
Services Transportation Plan, July 2008 
?  State Health Planning & Development Agency, Hawaii County SubArea Health 
Planning Council Transportation Study, prepared by Dolores Foley, Department 
of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Hawaii at Manoa 
?  County of Maui Short Range Transit Plan, January 2005 
?  Maui Island Plan, May 2010 
Integrated State and Local Process 
In order to coordinate transportation services, the federal, state and local policies also 
need to be coordinated to support one another. Consequently, this project developed 
new workgroups, at the state and local levels, to help guide the planning process and 
integrate state and local priorities.  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 28
 
A single State Mobility Workgroup was initiated to design selection criteria for 
distribution of federal funds. In addition, Local Mobility Workgroups were established in 
each county with the purpose of prioritizing transportation needs and gaps, as well as 
developing and implementing coordinated strategies that respond to those needs.  
The State Mobility Workgroup met three times during the project: October 2010, 
January 2011 and May 2011 (tentative). Membership of the State Mobility Workgroup 
includes: 
Chair: Ryan Fujii, Programming Section Manager, Department of 
Transportation, Statewide Transportation Planning Office  
Don Medeiros, Transit Manager, County of Maui 
Celia Mahikoa, Transit Manager, County of Kaua?i 
Tom Brown, Transit Manager, County of Hawaii 
Scott Ishiyama, Honolulu Department of Transit Services 
Caroline Cadirao, Department of Health, Executive Office on Aging 
Kay Yoneshige, Department of Human Services, Vocational Rehabilitation and 
Services for the Blind 
Keith Yabusaki, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, Community 
Services 
Judy Paik, Disability and Communication Access Board 
The Local Mobility Workgroups met four times during the project: July 2010, August-
September 2010, November-December 2010 and May 2011 (tentative). Membership of 
the Local Mobility Workgroups includes: 
County of Hawaii: 
Tom Brown, Transit Administrator, County of Hawaii, Mass Transit Agency 
Alan Parker, County of Hawaii, Office of Aging 
Harold Bugado, County of Hawaii Department of Parks and Recreation, Elderly 
Activities 
Lester Seto, Hawaii County Economic Opportunity Council  
County of Kaua?i:   
Celia Mahikoa, Kaua?i County Transportation Agency 
Kealoha Takahashi, Kaua?i County Agency on Elderly Affairs 
Terri Yamashiro, Kaua?i Center for Independent Living 
Rhodora Rojas, Kaua?i Center for Independent Living 
Christina Pilkington, ADA Coordinator 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 29
 
Pacita McDermott, Wilcox Adult Day Health 
Lynn Kua, Kaua?i Economic Opportunity 
County of Maui: 
Jud Cunningham, Aloha House 
Audrey McGauley, ARC of Maui 
Keri Pasion-Salas, ARC of Maui  
 
Don Medeiros, County of Maui - Department of Transportation 
 
 
 
Deborah Arendale, County of Maui - Office on Aging  
 
 
Melissa King-Hubert, Easter Seals 
 
 
Erllie Cabacungan, Hale Makua - Wailuka 
 
 
Mark Souza, Hale Makua - Wailuka 
 
 
Leola Muromoto, Kaunoa Senior Services 
 
George Reioux, MEO Inc. 
Inclusive Public Input Process 
The general public and key stakeholders were invited to play active roles throughout the 
planning process. Methods of engagement included: 
?  State and local mobility workgroups, as described above. 
 
?  Stakeholder interviews ? Each of the consultant teams solicited input from 
public transit and social service providers in Maui, Hawaii and Kaua?i Counties. 
 
?  Accessible website with public input form ? Hawaiirides.org was developed to 
provide information about the planning process and to allow opportunities for the 
public to provide input on the draft plan. 
 
?  Radio ads and press releases ? Press releases were submitted to local radio 
stations and newspapers to advertise public meeting opportunities. 
 
?  Newsletter articles ? Brief newsletter articles were drafted and distributed to 
social service providers who had indicated that they would distribute print or 
electronic newsletters to their program participants. 
 
?  Flyers and information sheets ? Information sheets about the project were 
distributed to public transit and social service providers prior to the stakeholder 
interviews. Public meeting flyers were emailed and mailed to public transit and 
social service providers in each of the counties, with a request that they distribute 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 30
 
the flyers to their program participants. For the initial public meetings, flyers were 
also hand-distributed to service providers and other community locations, such 
as grocery stores, to directly publicize the public meetings. For Kaua?i, the flyers 
were also translated into Ilocano and Tagalog. Service providers in Maui and 
Hawaii Counties indicated that translations were not necessary.  
 
?  Email and direct mail public meeting invites and needs review summaries ? 
Flyers for public meetings were emailed and/or mailed to each of the providers 
identified in the Title VI Economic Justice lists for each county, provided by the 
state Department of Transportation, as well as other transportation and social 
service providers. Needs summaries and priorities identified during the initial 
public meetings were distributed to the same groups, as well as public meeting 
participants, to verify the needs and priorities and capture any needs that were 
not previously identified. 
 
?  Public Meetings ? Open public meetings were held at two stages in the process, 
one to verify and prioritize needs and the other to review and comment on the 
complete draft plan. 
Figure 1-6: Timeline of Public Input Opportunities 
 
 
 
background image
Chapter 2. Hawaii County 
2A. Community Profile 
This chapter provides a description of the 
demographic trends in the County of Hawaii 
that reflect residents? travel patterns and auto 
dependency. This is followed by a discussion 
of the variety of transportation resources 
available to residents who are low-income, 
have a disability and/or are over 65 years of 
age. Finally, the chapter presents the 
prioritized transportation needs of these 
population groups and a list of coordinated transportation strategies. 
Study Area Description and Demographic Summary 
This demographic profile documents important characteristics about the County of 
Hawaii as they relate to this planning effort. In particular, the profile examines the 
presence and locations of older adults, individuals with disabilities, and low-income 
persons within the area.  
This aspect of the plan relies on data sources such as the United States Census Bureau 
and the Hawaii State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism. 
Census information from 2008 reflects population characteristics on a state and 
countywide level. Data pertaining to the individual communities is not available. We 
found that some relevant data points for this plan are only available for the year 2000. 
Where applicable, data for both 2000 and 2008 is shown. For each of the illustrating 
figures, the relevant data source is referenced. 
While new data has become available since writing this section of the report, it was 
determined that these data should remain in this report, as it is the same set of data 
used for the Hawaii Statewide Transportation Plan, More current data will be used in the 
updates of both of these plans. It is important to note that this information is provided 
only to develop a general understanding of the area in which this Coordination Plan will 
be applied. It will not be used in making FTA grant funding decisions. 
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 32 
 
Population Overview 
The County of Hawaii encompasses the entire island of Hawaii, and with a land area of 
just over 4,028 square miles, it is called the ?Big Island? to distinguish it from the State 
of Hawaii. The county encompasses almost 63% of the land area of the entire state. 
Population density for the county is 36 persons per square mile. Tourism is Hawaii 
County?s major industry, with approximately one out of six residents work in tourism. 
Agriculture, ranching, science and technology also support the county?s economy.  
Hilo is the county seat and the largest city. Other population centers are shown in 
Figure 2-1 below. 
Figure 2-1: Population Centers
13
 
Location 
Population 
Hilo 
47,181 
Kailua 
11,425 
Hawaiian Paradise Park 
8,186 
Waimea 
8,135 
Kalaoa 
7,864 
Holualoa 
7,069 
The primary focus of The Coordinated Public Transit ? Human Services Transportation 
Plan is to improve transportation options for three target populations ? seniors, persons 
with disabilities and people with low incomes. Individuals in these groups typically have 
less access to personal vehicles as their primary form of transportation. Transit 
dependent individuals can experience an especially difficult time in non-urban areas 
with low population densities and limited public transit services. Figure 2-2 presents 
population data for the County of Hawaii and the State of Hawaii as a whole. 
 
 
 
 
 
                                            
13 
Source: U.S. Census 2008 American Community Survey 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 33 
 
Figure 2-2: Basic Population Characteristics: 2000 to 2008
14
 
 
Total 
Population 
Persons aged 
65+ 
Persons with 
Disability, age 5+ 
Persons at or 
below 
Poverty Level 
State of Hawaii 
Census 2000 
1,211,537 
160,601 
13.3% 
199,819  16.4%  126,154  10.7% 
2008
 
Estimate 
1,288,198 
190,067 
14.8% 
Not available 
115,937  9% 
County of Hawaii 
Census 2000 
148,677 
20,119 
13.5% 
26,253 
18.9%  22,821 
15.7% 
2008
 
Estimate 
175,784 
24,239 
13.8% 
21,094 
12% 
22,852 
13% 
Older Individuals 
As shown in Figure 2-2 above, 13.8% of the residents of Hawaii County in 2008 were 
age 65 and older. This is lower than the statewide figure of 14.8%. The proportion of 
seniors, however, is projected to substantially increase over the next 25 years, as is 
shown in Figure 2-4 on page 33. 
Individuals with Disabilities 
In Hawaii County, among people at five years of age and older in 2008, 12% reported a 
disability, according to the American Community Survey, 2008. However, the 
prevalence of having a disability varied depending on age, from 2% of individuals 
between 5 and 15 years, to 9% of those 16 to 64 years, and to 39% of those 65 years 
and older. 
Individuals At or Below Poverty Level 
U.S. Census estimates for 2008 report median household income in Hawaii County at 
$54,044, which is lower than the state average of $66,701. As of 2008, the County 
reported 13% of all residents were living below the poverty line compared to 9% 
statewide. Eight percent of the 65 year and over population were below the poverty 
level. 
Access to a Vehicle 
As reported in the American Community Survey 2008, Hawaii County has a lower 
percentage of households without a car, van or truck for private use (5%) than the state 
as a whole (8.7%). Traditionally, individuals who rent a home are far less likely than 
                                            
14 
Source: U.S. Census 2000, 2008 American Community Survey
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 34 
 
homeowners to have access to a car. In addition, households headed by a person age 
65 years and older are less likely to have access to a car than other households. 
Homeless Population 
The homeless population on Hawaii decreased between 2005 and 2007. Based on 
Homeless Point-in-Time surveys conducted by the State of Hawaii Public Housing 
Authority
15
, there were 1,442 homeless individuals in 2005. The point-in-time count 
conducted in 2007 reported 1,290 people. These figures include both sheltered and 
unsheltered individuals. 
Persons with low-incomes, including those who are homeless, typically have 
transportation challenges that impede their ability to reach employment, training, or 
other necessary services. The expense of owning and maintaining a vehicle may be 
beyond reach for this population, and for some, even the cost of riding public 
transportation may be prohibitive. 
Race and Ethnicity 
No racial group residing in the County of Hawaii constitutes a majority. Figure 2-3 
shows the distribution of the population by race. 
Figure 2-3: Hawaii Population by Race
16
 
 
 
 
 
                                            
15 
Source:  Homeless  Point-in-Time  Count,  2007,  State  of  Hawaii,  Hawaii  Public  Housing 
Authority
 
16
 Source: U.S. Census 2000 
AIAN 
American Indian or Alaskan Native 
 
NHPI 
Native
 Hawaiian Pacific Islander 
 
2+ Races 
People who self-identified as being two or more races 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 35 
 
The Hispanic/Latino population, which accounts for 12% of the population, is not 
included in the chart above because it is an ethnicity and not tracked as a separate 
race.
17 
  
In the County of Hawaii, 20% of people at least 5 years of age reported that they spoke 
a language other than English at home. Of this group, 44% said that they did not speak 
English ?very well.? 
Population Trends 
The County of Hawaii is experiencing continuing and sustained population growth. The 
county recorded a population of 148,677 residents in 2000
18
. In 2007 the estimated 
population increased to 172,547. The Hawaii State Department of Business, Economic 
Development and Tourism projects that by 2020, 
more than 221,862 people will call Hawaii County 
home and by 2030, the population will reach 
approximately 261,758.  
Over the same time period, it is important to 
compare the population growth of the older 
population to the general population in the county. Figure 2-4 below shows the county-
wide growth of all residents as well as residents 65 and older. The percentage of older 
adults is projected to increase from 13.6% in 2007 to 24.6% in 2030.  
Figure 2-4:  County Population Projections: 2007 ? 2030 for Older Adults 
County of Hawaii 
2007 
2015 
2020 
2025 
2030 
TOTAL HAWAII COUNTY  172,547 
199,488 
221,862 
242,643 
261,758 
Population 65 and over 
23,427 
34,757 
44,939 
56,070 
64,390 
Population 65 and over as % 13.6% 
17.4% 
20.3% 
23.1% 
24.6% 
 
Economic Indicators in the County of Hawaii 
The following section provides economic information pertaining to the County of Hawaii, 
including unemployment rates, major employers in the county and employment 
changes. 
 
                                            
17
 U.S. Census 2006 ? 2008 American Community Survey 
18
 U.S. Census 2000 
The County of Hawaii is 
experiencing continuing and 
sustained population growth. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 36 
 
County of Hawaii Employment 
The visitor industry is the largest employment sector in the County of Hawaii. In the 
years 2005 ? 2007 the County experienced steady employment growth, adding 4,300 
jobs. This increase is offset, however by the 6,750 jobs that were lost in the 2008 ? 
2009 timeframe. This employment reduction represents an 8.1% decline from the 
employment peak in 2007. 
Figure 2-5: Major Employers in the County of Hawaii
19
 
Employer Name 
Location 
Employer Class Size 
Hilton ? Waikoloa Village 
Waikoloa 
1,000 ? 4,999 
Hilo Medical Center 
Hilo 
1,000 ? 4,999 
Fairmont Orchid Hawaii 
 Waikoloa 
500 - 999 
Mauna Lani Bay Hotel 
 Waikoloa 
500 - 999 
Canoe House Restaurant 
 Waikoloa 
500 - 999 
Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel 
 Waikoloa  
500 - 999 
Hawaii County Police Department 
Hilo 
250 - 499 
Four Seasons Resort 
Kailua Kona 
250 - 499 
North Hawaii Community Hospital 
 Waikoloa  
250 - 499 
Hawaii County Public Works 
Hilo 
250 - 499 
Wal-Mart 
Kailua Kona 
250 - 499 
Kona Community Hospital 
Kealakekua 
250 - 499 
Robert?s Hawaii Tours 
Kailua Kona 
250 - 499 
Unemployment Rate 
During the three year period 2005 - 2007, the county?s unemployment rates were 
somewhat higher than statewide statistics. However, in 2008 and 2009, unemployment 
in the County of Hawaii increased at a much higher rate than experienced throughout 
the rest of the State. Figure 2-6 below provides the increase in unemployment rates in 
both the County and the State during the entire five year period.  
Figure 2-6: Unemployment Rates: 2005 ? 2009
20
 
 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
State of Hawaii  
2.5% 
2.5% 
2.7% 
4.0% 
6.8% 
County of Hawaii 
3.3% 
2.9% 
3.4% 
5.6% 
9.7% 
                                            
19 
Source: Hawaii Workforce Informer, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, March 7, 
2008 
20 
Source: Hawaii Workforce Informer, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 37 
 
Geographic Distribution of Transit Need 
The maps on the following pages illustrate the areas within the County of Hawaii that 
likely have the greatest need for public transportation services.  
The Transit Dependency Index (Figure 2-7) represents concentrations of people who 
are most likely to need public transportation: seniors aged 65 or older, individuals with 
disabilities, and people with low income. This map displays the composite measure of 
these three indices. Figure 2-7 shows those parts of the focus area with the highest 
population and employment density. The highest population and employment areas 
typically generate the highest transit usage due in large part to the concentration of 
overall trips in these areas.  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 38 
 
Figure 2-7: Hawaii County Transit Dependency Index Map 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 39 
 
 
 Key Activity Centers and Travel Patterns 
The Big Island is the largest of the Hawaiian Islands with 4,028 square miles, making 
travel across the island sometimes difficult and time consuming. Most of the major 
employers on the island are based on the tourism industry, and those employers 
(hotels, resorts) are located on the western (Kona) side of the island. Hilo, on the east 
side of the island, serves as the county seat and is also home to the University of 
Hawaii and another major employer, the Hilo 
Medical Center.  
There are two major airports on the island?
one in Kona and one in Hilo; both of these can 
also be considered key destinations. Volcano 
National Park is located near the town of 
Volcano on the eastern side of the island, and 
the region of Puna, in the southeastern part of 
the island, is the fastest growing region in the 
state due to the availability of more affordable housing. Waimea serves as a major 
shopping destination for persons throughout the island.  
Stakeholders and participants for this planning project have indicated that there is a 
need for cross-island travel, especially for those in Kona to reach facilities or services in 
Hilo. Travel needs are not limited to one community or even region of the island.  
The Big Island is the largest of 
the Hawaiian Islands with 4,028 
square miles, making travel 
across the island sometimes 
difficult and time consuming. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 40 
 
 
Figure 2-8: Hawaii County Key Activity Center Map 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 41 
 
 
2B. Existing Transportation Services 
Background 
The County?s Department of Mass Transit administers Hele-On Bus, which provides 
public transportation services in Hawaii County. The Mass Transit Agency was created 
in 1975 to provide a county-wide public transportation system. Its annual operating 
budget is $5.2 million and funding sources include federal sources, such as the Job 
Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) Program, the Capital Program (5309), and Rural 
and Small Urban Area Program (5311), as well as Hawaii County general funds. County 
general funds provide the majority of transit funding.  
The Hele-On?s fleet consists of 53 vehicles, all of them have lifts or ramps. Sixty-one 
drivers are employed on a full-time and part-time status. 
The Hawaii County Mass Transit Agency?s programs include regular bus service 
operating 365 days per year, and a subsidized shared-ride taxi. In addition, Mass 
Transit supports the provision of curb-to-curb paratransit services through a contract 
with Hawaii County Economic Opportunity Council (HCEOC). These programs, as well 
as other human service transportation programs, are described below.  
Fixed Route  
During FY 2009-2010 Hele-On provided 1.1 million trips on its fixed route service. There 
are 14 fixed routes operating on the island; of these twelve are considered commuter 
bus service. The two non-commuter bus services are those that provide services within 
Hilo and within the Kona region of the island. Eight of the routes serve Hilo, the county 
seat of Hawaii County, and six serve other areas on the west side of the island. Most 
routes offer service Monday through Saturday and there are a few that offer additional 
runs seven days a week. Some services begin as early as 3:30 am and operate until 
1:00 am. Passenger service is free on all fixed routes.  
Figure 2-9 illustrates the routes of Hele-On Bus service. 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 42 
 
Figure 2-9: Hele-On Transit Route Map 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 43 
 
Characteristics of Hele-On Bus routes are summarized below: 
?  Hilo-Waikoloa Resorts: Service is provided between Hilo and Waikoloa 
Resorts, with stops in Papaikou, Laupahoehoe, Honokaa, Waimea, and the 
Waikoloa Resorts. The route operates daily with about nine runs in each 
direction; morning and early afternoon service operates towards Hilo and 
afternoon and early evening service operates towards the resorts. 
 
?  Intra-Hilo Bus (Hilo-Kaumana): This route operates between Downtown Hilo, 
Aninako and Kaumana. Among others, stops are made at the Mo?oheau Bus 
Terminal, the Hilo Library, and the Hilo Medical Center. There are five runs in 
each direction with service concentrated in the morning and early afternoon. 
Service operates Monday through Saturday. 
 
?  Intra-Hilo Bus (Hilo-Waiakea): This route operates between Downtown Hilo and 
Waiakea. Among others, stops are made at the Mo?oheau Bus Terminal, the Hilo 
Library, and the Hilo Medical Center. There are five runs in each direction with 
four operating in the morning and one in the afternoon. Service operates Monday 
through Saturday. 
 
?  Hilo-Ka?u-Volcano: This route operates between Mo?oheau Bus Terminal in Hilo 
and the Volcano National Park Visitor?s Center (one run extends to the Ocean 
View Park & Ride Lot), making stops at the University of Hawaii, Hawaii 
Community College, Prince Kuhio Plaza, and the Hilo Post Office. There are 
three runs each day; service from Hilo is available at 5:00 AM, 2:40 PM, and 4:40 
PM and service from Volcano National Park is provided at 6:10 AM, 8:00 AM, 
and 5:50 PM. Service operates Monday through Saturday. 
 
?  Hilo-Aupuni Center-Prince Kuhio Plaza: This route operates between 
Downtown Hilo and Aupuni Center or the Prince Kuhio Plaza. There are 13 runs 
in the morning and 14 in the afternoon/evening that begin at the Mooheau Bus 
Terminal in Downtown Hilo and stop at the Aupuni Center and continue on to the 
Prince Kuhio Plaza. The duration of the trip is 15-20 minutes. There are 10 
morning runs and 12 afternoon/evening runs. Service operates Monday through 
Saturday, but with five fewer runs in each direction operating on Saturday. 
 
?  Hilo-Honoka?a: This route operates between Honoka?a and Mo?oheau Bus 
Terminal or Prince Kuhio Plaza in Hilo (Only two or three runs in each direction 
extend to Prince Kuhio Plaza). In the Honokaa-Hilo direction, there are five 
morning and eight afternoon/evening runs. The trip duration is 50 minutes to 
Mo?oheau Bus Terminal and about 1.5 hours to Prince Kuhio Plaza. In the Hilo-
background image
 
P a g e
 | 44 
 
Honokaa direction, there are eight runs in the morning (seven begin at the Bus 
Terminal) and five runs in the afternoon. The majority of the runs operate daily 
with some operating fewer days each week. 
 
?  Pohoiki-Pahoa-Hilo: This route serves Pohoiki, Pahoa and Hilo, and also makes 
stops at the Hawaiian Beaches, Prince Kuhio Plaza, Hawaii Community College, 
the University of Hawaii, and shopping centers. From Hilo to Pahoa/Pohoiki, 
there are four morning and seven afternoon/evening runs. From Pohoiki/Pahoa 
to Hilo, there are four morning runs and seven afternoon/evening runs. 
Depending on the number of stops, the runs take between 1 hour and 1.5 hours. 
This route operates Monday through Friday; there is a reduced schedule on 
Saturday. 
 
?  Waimea-Hilo: This route operates between Hilo and Waimea and also makes 
stops in Honokaa, Paauilo, Laupahoehoe, Hakalau, Honomu, and Papaikou. 
Service runs daily, although some runs operate Monday-Friday or Monday-
Saturday only. End to end, the run?s duration is two hours, although the runs that 
terminate at the Moorheau Bus Terminal are 1 hour and 20 minutes. 
 
?  Kona-Hilo Route: Operating between Kona and Hilo, this route has 34 stops in 
both directions, although there are some shorter runs that don?t make all of the 
stops. There are two morning runs and one afternoon run in both directions; the 
run duration is between 3.0-4.5 hours depending on how many stops are made. 
This route operates Monday through Saturday. 
 
?  Keaukaha Route: This route operates between King?s Landing in Keaukaha and 
the Mo?oheau Bus Terminal. In the Mo?oheau direction, there are six stops and 
five morning and four afternoon runs. The run takes 20 minutes from end to end 
in this direction. In the Keaukaha direction, there are 10 stops, including the 
Univeristy of Hawaii, Hawaii Community College, and Prince Kuhio Plaza. There 
are four morning and four afternoon runs; the run duration is 35 minutes in this 
direction. Service operates Monday through Saturday. 
 
?  Pahala-South Kohala: This route operates between Pahala on the south side of 
the island and South Kohola in the northwest corner of the island. It makes 18 
stops, including many of the hotels and shopping centers, Keahole Airport, 
Ocean View Park & Ride Lot, and the Naalehu School. In the Pahala-South 
Kohala Resorts direction, there are two morning runs operating Monday-
Saturday and one afternoon run that operates daily. End to end, the run takes 
about 3.5 hours. In the South Kohala Resorts-Pahala direction, there is one 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 45 
 
morning run (Monday-Saturday) and two afternoon runs (daily, Monday-
Saturday). 
 
?  North Kohala-South Kohala: This route operates in the far northern area of the 
island with service between Kapa?au and the Hilton Waikoloa. There is one run in 
the morning departing Kapa?au at 6:20 and arriving to the Hilton Waikoloa at 
7:40. In the afternoon there is one run departing the Hilton Waikoloa at 4:15 and 
arriving to Kapa?au at 5:35. Service operates Monday through Saturday. 
 
?  North Kohala-Waimea-Keauhou: This route provides service in the far 
northwest corner of the island, serving Kapa?au, Waimea, Waikoloa Village, and 
Keauhou. There is one morning southbound run that departs Kapa?au at 6:45 
and arrives at Keauhou at 9:50. In the afternoon, there is a northbound run 
departing Keauhou at 1:35 and arriving in Kapa?au at 4:55. This route operates 
Monday through Friday. On Saturday, there is an express route with one morning 
and one afternoon run.  
 
?  Intra-Kona: This route serves the Kona area and makes 15 stops, including the 
Kona Hospital, shopping centers, the Old Airport/Kona Commons, and the Kona 
International Airport. In the northbound direction, there are six morning runs and 
four afternoon runs; in the southbound direction, there are four morning runs and 
six afternoon/evening runs. The trip duration is about 1 hour and 15 minutes. 
Most runs operate Monday through Saturday. 
 
?  Intra-Waimea: This route serves the Waimea area and makes seven stops: 
Lakeland, Waimea Civic Center, Waimea Park, HPA Lower Campus, Jacaranda 
Inn, and Kamuela View Estates. Service runs every hour between 6:30 AM and 
5:00 PM. Service operates Monday through Saturday. 
Shared-ride Taxi Program 
The County of Hawaii sponsors door-to-door transportation service within the urbanized 
area of Hilo and the Kailua-Kona area through its flexible shared-ride taxi program. This 
program is open to the public and allows taxi companies to consolidate trips. There are 
no eligibility requirements. 
Passengers are required to pay for their trip using non-transferrable coupons. There are 
three sizes of ticket books: a $30.00 book has 15 coupons, a $25.00 book has 10 
coupons, and a $15.00 book has five coupons. Individual tickets range from $2.00 to 
$3.00 depending on the quantity purchased. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 46 
 
There is a limit of one book per person per week and all tickets expire within one year. 
The maximum allowable trip length is nine miles. A trip of 1 to4 miles = one coupon and 
a trip of 4.1 to 9 miles = two coupons. 
There are seven participating taxi companies in Hilo and one in Kona. Two of the 
companies provide service to Hilo Airport. Service hours are subject to the taxi 
companies? discretion. 
Paratransit 
Twelve of Hele-On?s 14 fixed route bus routes are considered commuter bus service, 
and are therefore not subject to complementary ADA paratransit requirements. Hele-On 
staff has also indicated that the two remaining routes, those that circulate through Hilo 
and Kailua, will deviate upon request, and also do not require complementary 
paratransit. Therefore, no ADA complementary paratransit service is provided on the 
Big Island. Paratransit services are provided as described below.  
Hawaii County Economic Opportunity Council 
The County of Hawaii contracts with the Hawaii County Economic Opportunity Council 
to provide paratransit services. The County allocates $500,000 for paratransit services 
for those who are not able to take public transit. The service is primarily oriented to 
people with disabilities, older adults, young children, and low income populations. 
Persons requesting trips are asked to fill out an application form; eligibility is income-
based as services are intended for those with a low-income. Those who could otherwise 
take public transit are encouraged to do so.  
In addition, the Hawaii County Economic Opportunity Council operates client-based 
paratransit services for a number of other agencies, including the Office on Aging, Head 
Start, and Medicaid.  
During FY 2009-2010, 663 total passengers were served and 78,708 total trips were 
made. The agency?s paratransit budget totals $881,000. Of this, about 56% is provided 
through County Mass Transit; remaining revenues are provided through the Office on 
Aging, Head Start, and Medicaid (HCEOC also serves as a provider for non-emergency 
medical transportation on behalf of the State Medicaid program, known as MedQuest). 
The service area includes the entire area of Hawaii County. Paratransit services are 
provided Monday through Friday from 7:00 AM-3:00 PM. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 47 
 
There are 22 vehicles in the paratransit fleet: two 8-passenger vehicles, twelve 20-
passenger vehicles, and eight 14-passenger vehicles. Eighteen drivers are employed 
for paratransit services. 
Hawaii County Parks and Recreation Coordinated Services for the Elderly (CSE) 
The Elderly Activities Division is a public agency created in 1975 and is currently 
operated through the Hawaii County Department of Parks and Recreation. The 
agency?s primary mission is to provide information and assistance (I&A) for seniors age 
60+ regarding a variety of services available within the county. These services are 
handled through EAD?s 29 fulltime employees within Coordinated Services for the 
Elderly (CSE). CSE coordinates with various programs, such as the Nutrition Program, 
Elderly Recreation Program, and the Senior Training and Employment Program.  
CSE provides transportation to two of the fifteen nutrition sites operating on the island, 
as well as all eleven Senior Centers. The agency has a fleet of 22 vehicles, and their 
primary source of fleet funding is HDOT. All maintenance is handled through the county 
motor pool. CSE also has a contract to handle civil defense transportation for seniors in 
the event of an emergency. The agency has never had a direct contract with Mass 
Transit, but does coordinate with them as needed.  
In addition, CSE staff provides transportation services to people with disabilities who are 
under 60 years of age in the Hilo district and with limited services in other districts on a 
priority basis. Contributions are accepted and the suggested contribution is $2.00 per 
trip. Priority is given in the following order: medical care, access to resource agencies to 
qualify for benefits or services, and essential shopping assistance. 
Other Transportation Programs  
A number of other agencies provide limited transportation services that are typically 
designed to serve their own programs and clientele. Their operating characteristics are 
summarized in Appendix A, the provider inventory. Some examples of these services 
are:  
Hawaii Island Adult Care 
The Center owns and operates 3 vans to transport people into the center, group 
excursions, and occasionally medical appointments or therapy. There are 3 part time 
drivers, all of whom have other staffing responsibilities. They serve older adults and 
people with physical disabilities. At present there are 89 clients; of these, about 60 
people per day come to the center for a meal program or other activities.  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 48 
 
The program provides approximately 12 trips per day, or 60 trips per week, plus 
excursions. The clients are charged a fare, depending on how far they travel; on 
average trips may cost $5 - $7 for a one-way ride. The operating cost for providing the 
transportation service on an annual basis totals approximately $52,000, which does not 
include staffing costs. About 50% of this is covered by fares.  
The agency has received one vehicle with federal Section 5310 funds, and another 
Section 5310 vehicle is on the way.  
Kona Adult Day Center  
This is a private non-profit providing a variety of services for adults with special needs, 
ages eighteen and up. The agency has the capacity to serve up to 60 clients, but 
currently has just 30, due in part to job cutbacks amongst their client?s families. They do 
not provide any medical care/transportation services. Their service area extends from 
the Kona Airport in the North down to Captain Cook in the South. The agency offers 
excursions 2-3 time per month with their two vans; one of which has a wheelchair lift. 
 The Arc of Kona 
This is a private non-profit providing services for persons with disabilities, their 
advocates and families. They strive to assist persons with disabilities to achieve the 
fullest possible independence and participation in the community. The agency offers 
adult day programs, personal assistance, chore services, residential services, job 
placement and vocational training. They work with DHS caseworkers to team up with 
developmental and mentally challenged persons to teach a variety of life skills. They 
typically host 30 clients per day for the day programs. The agency provides twice 
weekly excursions to a local ranch, the library, etc., receiving a percentage of funding 
per client from DHS for transportation services to help defray costs. 
The Brantley Center 
The Brantley Center, Inc. is a private non-profit, devoted to working with people with 
physical and mental disabilities. The agency provides training programs focused on 
encouraging independence in the home, workplace, and community. They also provide 
information and referral services to assist clients to gain access to housing, health care, 
employment, and education. The employment rehabilitation program offers older 
students with disabilities the opportunity to transition from school to the work 
environment during their senior year of high school.  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 49 
 
The service area is primarily North Hilo, North Kohala and other rural parts of the 
Northwestern tip of Hawaii. The agency maintains a fleet of two vehicles, one of which 
is wheelchair accessible. These are used exclusively for day excursions, including the 
senior center, movies, beach days, the swimming pool, and Hilo Arc. Agency vehicles 
are driven by staff who are estimated to spend 10% of their time performing these tasks, 
in addition to a variety of other functions. The Brantley Center has a contract with 
HCEOC to provide clients with transportation to and from the center. All transportation 
costs are included as part of the client?s tuition. 
Alu Like 
Alu Like is a non-profit organization that provides a range of services to older adults (60 
years and over) of Native Hawaiian ancestry and their spouses. They are located in 
Oahu, Kaua?i, Hawaii, Maui and Molokai. The organization provides transportation to 
any of its eligible clients for any trip purpose. Alu Like maintains five vehicles in its fleet. 
Drivers also have other job responsibilities with the organization. They receive in-house 
training and bi-annual update training. 
2C. Transportation Needs Assessment 
The following needs were derived from stakeholder interviews, data review, and review 
of other studies and reports. These reports include:  
?  Hawaii Department of Transportation, Coordinated Public Transit-Human 
Services Transportation Plan, July 2008. 
?  State Health Planning & Development Agency, Hawaii County SubArea Health 
Planning Council Transportation Study, prepared by Dolores Foley, Department 
of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Hawaii at Manoa.  
Stakeholders were asked to elaborate on the role their organization plays in providing or 
arranging transportation, the budget and level of service provided, and any perceptions 
or experiences with unmet transportation needs or gaps in service specific to the 
clientele served by the agency. It is important to note that the summary reports reflect 
the views, opinions, and perceptions of those interviewed. The resulting information was 
not verified or validated for accuracy.  
This needs assessment was reviewed and confirmed through additional consultation 
with key stakeholders, as well as review with members of the public at two workshops 
held in Kailua-Kona on August 30 and in Hilo on August 31, 2010. 
Below is a summary of transportation needs and gaps identified for Hawaii County. 
While these   needs have not been validated or otherwise verified, it is important to note 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 50 
 
that they represent the views, perspectives and opinions of those consulted for this 
project, and are considered as the basis for developing mobility strategies later in this 
chapter. 
Infrastructure/Capacity Needs 
 
Need for increased funding and staffing capacity to provide agency 
transportation services 
?  Many social service agencies provide limited client-based transportation, but 
transportation is not considered a core function of the overall mission. 
 
?  Most cannot afford the dedicated drivers needed to enhance transportation 
services.  
 
?  Agency personnel must ?wear multiple hats? providing direct client support as 
well as drive the vehicles.  
 
?  For the most part, these social service agencies do not have the infrastructure or 
expertise to manage a transportation program. 
 
?  Most agencies expressed concern about the impact of transportation costs to 
their low-income clients. 
 
?  Due to state budget cuts, some agencies are closed for services on certain 
required furlough days, which makes access even more critical for their client 
populations on the days they are open.  
 
?  Several stakeholders expressed the need for in-house or collective grant-writing 
skills and services, to improve their ability to be competitive for state and federal 
transportation and infrastructure funds. 
Improve and add equipment and capital infrastructure 
?  Many of the stakeholders cited significant concerns about availability of fleet 
vehicles and the condition of vehicles. 
 
?  Stakeholders expressed concern about the age of their fleets and a desire/need 
to have more consistent access to replacement vehicles. 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 51 
 
?  Several agencies indicated an interest in contracting with other organizations to 
provide transportation services to additional populations with existing or 
enhanced fleets. 
 
?  Stakeholders commented on the lack of safe, well-marked and accessible bus 
stops located along fixed route lines. This is especially an issue in the Puna 
region. 
 
?  Others expressed the opinion that the shared-ride taxi service isn?t adequately 
serving the community outside of the 11 mile radius around Hilo, and there is a 
lack of accessible vehicles within the taxi fleet. 
Technology/Software Needs 
Improve speed and ease of communication 
?  Internet connections are reportedly slow in the county, radio communication is 
spotty in some areas, and few, if any, providers use automated scheduling 
programs. Improvements in these areas would help make transportation services 
more efficient and effective. 
Policy/Planning Needs 
Improve land use planning 
?  There appears to be no county requirements for developers to pay transportation 
impact fees for development occurring in areas far from basic services. As a 
result, people are moving to areas where housing is more affordable, but are not 
easily accessible to jobs, medical facilities or other services. This may be 
contributing to the difficulties residents face in these areas when attempting to 
obtain access to public transportation for work, errands, recreation or special 
needs services. For example, Paradise Park is one of the fastest growing areas 
in the county, yet it is five miles from the highway. People are moving there for 
more affordable housing, but then have to commute all the way to Hilo for 
employment or other essential services. Since the fixed route lines only run along 
the highway, this means these residents must travel some distance from their 
homes to the highway bus stops.  People who rely on paratransit or who do not 
have access to an automobile are even more isolated because they have fewer 
mobility options.  
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 52 
 
Service/Assistance Needs 
Expand transit service area and level of service 
?  The County covers a very broad, geographically diverse area. Access to many of 
the rural regions is especially challenging for lift-equipped vehicles. This is 
especially true in the Kona region, where a number of clients live in the high hilly 
coffee growing areas. 
 
?  It was reported that some parts of the island are not currently being adequately 
served by transit or paratransit services, including the northwestern tip, Kauu, 
Puna. Other site-specific needs were also discussed, such as the Hilo Pier, 
senior living communities and some subdivisions. The distance to bus stops is 
often inaccessible, especially for older adults and people with disabilities, in 
these areas due to difficult terrain. For people living in rural areas this causes a 
significant challenge to accessing employment. 
 
?  The lack of transit service on the weekends and late at night and limited 
frequency of runs and stops were also cited as creating challenges to accessing 
work and other basic needs. This is especially true in the rural areas.   
 
?  In general, there is a need for more door to door transportation for persons with 
disabilities throughout the island. Such services are currently limited resulting in 
an unmet demand for paratransit.  
Improve public information 
?  A number of the stakeholders on the island indicated that they were unaware of 
special needs transportation options beyond what they currently utilized or 
directly offered their clients. For example, the fact that Hele-On deviates off some 
fixed routes is not well advertised. Better public awareness could encourage use 
of fixed route services. Many would like consolidated information about these 
resources, as well as the eligibility criteria, schedules and routes to be shared 
comprehensively throughout the special needs community, including veterans. 
Typical means of distributing information does not always reach people most in 
need, as some do not have access to telephones or the internet.  
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 53 
 
Coordination Needs 
Enhance coordination among service providers 
?  Service providers uniformly expressed an interest in coordination with others, 
especially with regard to the sharing of driver training resources, but they 
expressed concerns about liability/insurance issues and schedule conflicts.  
 
?  A lead agency to direct coordination efforts, or to work towards mutual goals and 
objectives on behalf of social service agencies and their constituents does not 
currently exist. 
Training Needs 
Coordinate and expand training information 
?  There is interest in coordinating training among service providers on The Big 
Island.  Specific training interests include travel training to help riders learn to ride 
the fixed route bus, hands-on training for drivers on safety issues, as well as 
instruction on how to use a wheelchair lift and wheelchair securement devices. 
Additionally, there was some interest in training on how to start a new 
transportation service.  
 
Prioritized Transportation Needs   
During the public meeting held in Kailua-Kona on August 30 and in Hilo on August 31, 
2010, participants ranked the needs categories then ranked the list of needs within the 
top three categories. The top three categories were Service/Assistance (79%), 
Capacity/Infrastructure (53%), and Coordination (29%) needs. The prioritized list of 
mobility needs in these categories was reviewed by the Local Mobility Workgroup, 
which concurred with the prioritization of the Workshop participants. The priority needs 
were again reviewed via a survey distributed in November 2010 and at a final public 
meeting to review the draft plan on June 29, 2011. Some refinement was made to the 
various needs as described in more detail above. 
Following are the results. 
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 54 
 
Service/Assistance Needs 
Public meeting participants? needs varied in degree between the Hilo and Kona 
meetings. However, the rankings were generally consistent, with door-to-door 
transportation being the top ranked need overall. Details are displayed in Figure 2-10. 
Figure 2-10: Most Important Service/Assistance Needs 
 
Capacity/Infrastructure Needs 
Priorities for capacity/infrastructure needs also varied between Hilo and Kona meeting 
participants. However, both groups ranked newer and smaller lift-equipped vehicles at 
the top of this category of needs. Figure 2-11 displays the detailed results.  
Figure 2-11: Most Important Capacity/Infrastructure Needs 
35%  (6)  
47%  (8)  
47%  (8)  
41%  (7)  
44%  (8)  
50%  (9)  
56%  (10)  
78%  (14)  
40%  (14)  
49%  (17)  
51%  (18)  
60%  (21)  
Transporta7on  to  medical  appts  
Transporta7on  for  non-­?medical  
appts  
Informa7on      
Door-­?to-­?door  transporta7on  
Total  
Kona  
Hilo  
39%  (7)  
44%  (8)  
33%  (6)  
50%  (9)  
28%  (5)  
50%  (9)  
26%  (5)  
21%  (4)  
37%  (7)  
42%  (8)  
63%  (12)  
53%  (10)  
32%  (12)  
32%  (12)  
35%  (13)  
46%  (17)  
46%  (17)  
51%  (19)  
Shared-­?ride  taxis  
Trained  people  for  emergency  
svcs  
Resources  to  manage  transp  
needs  
Safe/accessible  bus  stops/shelters  
Newer  vehicles  
Smaller  liP-­?equipped  vehicles  
Total  
Kona  
Hilo  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 55 
 
Coordination Needs 
Public meeting participants discussed the polling results and determined that 
coordinated scheduling and shared trips was essentially the same thing. As a result, the 
priorities established by both groups of meeting participants were very similar, with 
coordinated scheduling/trips and a lead coordinating agency at the top. Detailed results 
are shown in Figure 2-12.  
Figure 2-12: Most Important Coordination Needs 
2D. Strategies for Improved Service and Coordination 
This section describes local strategies designed to address the mobility gaps identified 
during previous meetings in the County of Hawaii. These strategies were initially 
developed by the consultant team based on interviews, public meetings, local mobility 
workgroup input, and past experience in working on projects of similar scope. During a 
local provider workshop held in Hilo on December 6, 2010, the Local Mobility 
Workgroup, comprised of transportation and social service providers, refined and 
prioritized these strategies. The participants of the Workgroup meeting are listed in 
Appendix C. 
The strategies presented at the December Workshop were prioritized into four 
categories, A-D, with A being the top priority category. In order to prioritize the 
strategies, workshop participants reviewed each strategy in terms of: 
?  The number of critical needs that could be met;  
?  Its financial feasibility;  
?  Feasibility of implementation; and  
24%  (4)  
59%  (10)  
41%  (7)  
59%  (10)  
22%  (4)  
28%  (5)  
50%  (9)  
23%  (8)  
29%  (10)  
34%  (12)  
54%  (19)  
Address  liability  issues  
Coordinate  shared  ride  trips  
Lead  agency  -­?  coordina7on  
e?orts  
Coordinate  scheduling  
Total  
Kona  
Hilo  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 56 
 
?  The involvement of coordination, partnerships and potential community support.  
As several workshop participants were new to the process and had not previously 
attended stakeholder meetings, an overview of the entire planning project was provided. 
In particular, unmet transportation needs specific to the Big Island were discussed as 
well as their ranking from the public meetings held in August in Kona and Hilo.  
Workshop participants were then provided with a list of six potential service strategies, 
and the group added another strategy. They were then asked to rate strategies each for 
categories A-D. These decisions were made by consensus. The results of this process 
are described below, including brief descriptions of each strategy and the needs they 
are intended to address. 
Category A 
Strategy 
Description 
Need(s) Addressed 
HSTP Goals/ 
Objectives 
Addressed
21
 
Develop a 
countywide 
vehicle 
replacement 
schedule 
Determine optimal number 
of smaller vehicles. 
Explore cost effective 
opportunities for non-
profits to purchase surplus 
public agency vehicles, 
including vanpool vehicles.  
?  Systematic 
approach to 
vehicle 
replacement 
?  Need to expand 
paratransit fleet 
?  Goal 1, 
Objective 1 
Establish a 
mobility 
manager 
position (within 
an existing 
agency) 
Develop and staff a 
coordination council, 
prepare a coordination 
action plan, seek and 
apply for relevant grant 
funds, develop and 
conduct a travel training 
program, and facilitate 
training opportunities. 
Provide leadership in 
providing service in 
underserved areas and at 
underserved times. 
?  Lack of local 
designated lead 
agency to 
implement 
coordination 
activities 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 3 
and 5 
?  Goal 4, 
Objective 5 
                                            
21
 HSTP Goals and Objectives are detailed in Appendix D. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 57 
 
Develop a 
transportation 
financial plan 
Develop a long-term 
financial plan and 
advocacy strategy to seek 
new sources of funds in 
addition to federal funds 
provided through this 
planning effort. Include all 
agencies that provide 
transportation services. 
?  Need to expand, 
enhance and 
improve special 
transportation 
services 
throughout the 
county 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 1 
and 5 
 
 
Category B 
 
Strategy 
Description 
Need(s) Addressed 
HSTP Goals/ 
Objectives 
Addressed 
Develop a 
countywide 
information 
center 
This strategy would 
update customer 
information and referral 
materials, including 
websites and links to 
appropriate resources. It 
would also develop and 
distribute resource 
materials focused on 
how to use the 
transportation systems in 
each client?s area. 
Information should be 
provided in different 
formats and various 
locations, such as 
libraries. 
?  Lack of information 
about local 
transportation 
resources and how 
to access them  
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2 
and 5 
?  Goal 4, 
Objective 5 
?  Goal 5, 
Objective 4 
Expand taxi 
voucher 
program 
This strategy would 
expand the geographic 
service area available to 
clients and research 
ways for the taxi fleet to 
incorporate more 
accessible vehicles. 
?  Need to provide 
additional taxi 
vouchers in some 
circumstances 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2 
and 5 
?  Goal 4, 
Objective 5 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 58 
 
Bus Stop 
Improvement 
Plan 
This strategy involves 
conducting a fixed route 
resource assessment to 
determine routes, origins 
and destinations  for 
persons with disabilities; 
developing a plan to 
identify and prioritize how 
and where signage, 
shelters and accessible 
bus stops should be 
located; and identifying 
and applying for 
applicable grant funding 
sources  
?  Need to access 
existing fixed route 
services, especially 
for persons with 
disabilities 
?  Goal 1, 
Objective 5 
?  Goal 2, 
Objectives 1 
and 4 
 
Category C 
 
Strategy 
Description 
Need(s) Addressed 
HSTP Goals/ 
Objectives 
Addressed 
Enhance use 
of technology 
 
This approach involves 
developing strategies to 
enhance use of 
technology, such as 
coordinated scheduling 
programs, better internet 
access, use of AVL and 
GPS systems for 
paratransit fleets, etc. 
?  Need to improve 
coordination and 
communication 
across the county 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 1, 3 
and 5 
Develop and 
implement 
pilot projects 
 
This strategy involves 
developing a vehicle 
sharing program to allow 
two agencies to share 
use of single vehicle(s) 
and/or drivers. It also 
involves developing a 
coordinated service 
program, to allow two 
agencies to provide 
services for each other?s 
clients. 
?  Need to relieve 
some social service 
agencies of 
transportation tasks 
?  Need to expand and 
extend limited 
resources 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 1 
and 5 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 59 
 
 
Public Comment on Strategies 
A public meeting was held in Hilo on June 27, 2011, and in Kona on June 28, 2011. In 
both meetings, participants concurred that the listing of transportation needs was 
thorough and accurate. While most participants concurred with the presented strategies, 
there was not uniform consensus that these strategies were comprehensive enough. As 
a result, additional strategies were identified: 
Establish connector service to help people access the fixed route transit service.
 
Create a downtown circulator service to ease access to entertainment and 
general quality of life activities.
 
Establish direct connections to transit or other transportation services for senior 
housing sites
 
Expand and coordinate training for all transportation providers.
 
Expand transit service into later evening hours and on weekends and holidays.
 
Provide additional funding to existing transportation providers who are already 
operating throughout the island.
 
In general, expanded bus service is needed, particularly in West Hawaii.
 
Several participants expressed their interest in moving beyond planning, conducting 
surveys, and developing needs assessments in order to implement solutions. One 
participant enthusiastically added, ?Let?s move forward!? 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 60 
 
 
Chapter 3: Kaua?i County 
3A. Community Profile 
This chapter provides a description of the 
demographic trends in the County of Kaua?i 
that reflect residents? travel patterns and auto 
dependency. This is followed by a discussion 
of the variety of transportation resources 
available to residents who are low-income, 
have a disability and/or are over 65 years of 
age. Finally, the chapter presents the 
prioritized transportation needs of these 
population groups and a list of coordinated transportation strategies. 
Study Area Description and Demographic Summary 
This demographic profile documents important characteristics about Kaua?i County as 
they relate to this planning effort. In particular, the profile examines the presence and 
locations of older adults, individuals with disabilities, and low-income persons within the 
area.  
This aspect of the plan relies on data sources such as the United States Census Bureau 
and the Hawaii State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism. 
Census information from 2008 reflects population characteristics on a state and 
countywide level. Data pertaining to the individual communities is not available. We 
found that some relevant data points for this plan are only available for the year 2000. 
Where applicable, data for both 2000 and 2008 is shown. For each of the illustrating 
figures, the relevant data source is referenced. 
While new data has become available since writing this section of the report, it was 
determined that these data should remain in this report, as it is the same set of data 
used for the Hawaii Statewide Transportation Plan, More current data will be used in the 
updates of both of these plans. It is important to note that this information is provided 
only to develop a general understanding of the area in which this Coordination Plan will 
be applied. It will not be used in making FTA grant funding decisions. 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 61 
 
Population Overview 
With a land area of just over 622 square miles, the County of Kaua?i is comprised of the 
islands of Kaua?i, Niihau, Lehua, and Kaula. Population density for the County overall is 
94 persons per square mile. Tourism is the County?s major industry.  
The county seat of Lihu?e is located on the island of Kaua?i. Other population centers (all 
areas over 1,500 population) are shown in Figure 3-1 below: 
Figure 3-1:  Population Centers
22
 
Location 
Population 
Kapa?a 
9,472 
Lihu?e (County Seat) 
5,674 
Wailua Homesteads 
4,567 
Kalaheo 
3,913 
Hanamaulu 
3,272 
Kekaha 
3,175 
Hanapepe 
2,153 
Kilauea 
2,092 
Wailua 
2,083 
Eleele 
2,040 
Lawai 
1,984 
Koloa 
1,942 
Anahola 
1,932 
Waimea 
1,787 
Princeville 
1,698 
Virtually all county residents live on the island of Kaua?i. Census 2000 figures report that 
160 individuals lived on Niihau while both Lehua and Kaula were uninhabited. The focus 
of this plan will be the island of Kaua?i. 
The primary focus of the Coordinated Public Transit ? Human Services Transportation 
Plan is to improve transportation options for three target populations ? seniors, persons 
with disabilities and people with low incomes. Individuals in these groups typically have 
less access to personal vehicles as their primary form of transportation. Transit 
dependent individuals can experience an especially difficult time in non-urban areas 
                                            
22
 
Source: U.S. Census, 2000
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 62 
 
with low population densities and limited public transit services. Figure 3-2 presents 
population data for the County of Kaua?i and the State of Hawaii. 
Figure 3-2:  Basic Population Characteristics: 2000 to 2008
23
 
 
Total 
Population 
Persons aged 
65+ 
Persons with 
Disability, age 5+ 
Persons at or 
below 
Poverty Level 
State of Hawaii 
Census 2000 
1,211,537 
160,601 
13.3% 
199,819  16.4%  126,154  10.7% 
2008
 
Estimate 
1,288,198 
190,067 
14.8% 
Not available 
115,937  9% 
County of Kaua?i 
Census 2000 
58,463 
8,069 
13.8% 
10,662  19.6% 
6,085 
10.5% 
2008
 
Estimate 
63,689 
9,470 
14.9% 
Not available 
5,095 
8% 
Older Individuals 
As shown in Figure 3-2 above, 14.9% of the residents of Kaua?i County in 2008 were 
age 65 and older. This is very similar to the statewide figure. However, the proportion of 
seniors in Kaua?i is projected to increase over the next 25 years, as is shown in Figure 
3-4 on page 61. 
Individuals with Disabilities 
As shown in Figure 3-2, 2008 census 
information for individuals with disabilities 
in Kaua?i County is not available due to the 
small size of the sample. 2008 American 
Community Survey states, ?Displaying 
data would risk disclosing individual data.?  
However, the proportion of people with 
disabilities in 2000 was noticeably higher for Kaua?i than the statewide percentage. 
Individuals At or Below Poverty Level 
Poverty levels overall are fairly comparable between the County of Kaua?i and the 
statewide numbers. U.S. Census estimates for 2008 report median household income in 
Kaua?i County at $62,359, which is slightly lower than the state average of $66,701. As 
                                            
23
 
Source: U.S. Census 2000, 2008 American Community Survey; 2006 ? 2008 American 
Community Survey
 
Kaua?i County has a significantly 
lower percentage of households 
without a car, van or truck for private 
use (4%) than the state as a whole. 
(8.7%). 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 63 
 
of 2008, the County reported 8% of all residents were living below the poverty line 
compared to 9% statewide. Eight percent of individuals 65 years and over were below 
the poverty level, suggesting that seniors in Kaua?i are not disproportionately low-
income compared to other age groups. 
Access to a Vehicle 
As reported in the American Community Survey 2008, Kaua?i County has a significantly 
lower percentage of households without a car, van or truck for private use (4%) than the 
state as a whole (8.7%). Car ownership is often closely associated with income levels, 
and yet there is no significant difference between the income levels of the state and the 
county. A possible explanation for the exceptionally high car ownership rate on the 
island could be due to the limited availability of bus service and the low density patterns, 
which make reliance on non-auto alternatives more difficult.  
Homeless Population 
The homeless population on Kaua?i was relatively stable between 2005 and 2007. 
Based on Homeless Point-in-Time surveys conducted by the State of Hawaii Public 
Housing Authority
24
, there were 248 homeless individuals in 2005. The point-in-time 
count conducted in 2007 reported 257 people. These figures include both sheltered and 
unsheltered individuals. 
Persons with low-incomes, including those who are homeless, typically have 
transportation challenges that impede their ability to reach employment, training, or 
other necessary services. The expense of owning and maintaining a vehicle may be 
beyond reach for this population, and for some, even the cost of riding public 
transportation may be prohibitive. 
Race and Ethnicity 
No racial group residing in the County of Kaua?i constitutes a majority. Figure 3-3 shows 
the distribution of the population by race. 
 
 
 
                                            
24
 Source: Homeless Point-in-Time Count, 2007, State of Hawaii, Hawaii Public Housing 
Authority 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 64 
 
Figure 3-3: Kaua?i Population by Race 
 
The Hispanic/Latino population, which accounts for approximately 10% of the 
population, is not included in the chart above because it is an ethnicity and not tracked 
as a separate race.
25  
 
In the County of Kaua?i, 18% of people at least 5 years of age reported that they spoke 
a language other than English at home. Of this group, 38% said that they did not speak 
English ?very well.? 
Population Trends 
The County of Kaua?i is experiencing continuing and sustained population growth. The 
County recorded a population of 58,463 residents in 2000
26
. In 2007, the estimated 
population increased to 62,761. The Hawaii 
State Department of Business, Economic 
Development and Tourism projects that by 
2020, more than 72,000 people will call 
Kaua?i County home and by 2030, the 
population will reach approximately 79,000.  
The population growth of the County during 
the next two decades is important to compare 
to related increases in older residents during the same period of time. Figure 3-4 below 
shows the county-wide growth of all residents as well as of residents 65 and older. The 
                                            
25
 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2006 - 2008. 
26
 
Source: 
U.S. Census 2000
 
The percentage of older adults is 
projected to increase substantially 
from 14.7% in 2007 to 24.4% in 
2030. 
AIAN 
American Indian or Alaskan Native 
 
NHPI 
Native
 Hawaiian Pacific Islander 
 
2+ Races 
People who self-identified as being two or more races 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 65 
 
percentage of older adults is projected to increase substantially from 14.7% in 2007 to 
24.4% in 2030.  
Figure 3-4: County Population Projections: 2007 ? 2030 for Older Adults
27
 
County of Kaua?i 
2007 
2015 
2020 
2025 
2030 
TOTAL KAUA?I COUNTY  62,761 
68,440 
72,148 
75,598 
78,837 
Population 65 and over 
9,200 
12,227 
14,884 
17,409 
19,217 
Population 65 and over as 
14.7% 
17.9% 
20.6% 
23% 
24.4% 
Economic Indicators in the County of Kaua?i 
The following section contains economic information pertaining to the County of Kaua?i, 
including unemployment rates, major employers in the county and employment 
changes. 
County of Kaua?i Employment 
The visitor industry is the largest employment sector in the County of Kaua?i. However, 
the Kaua?i Economic Outlook Summary 2009 -10 states that visitor arrivals dropped 
14% during 2008 and are not expected to recover until 2010 - 2011. The impact of the 
global economic downturn in 2008 had a devastating effect on Kaua?i?s economy. The 
loss of cruise ship dockings and the bankruptcy of Aloha Airlines had ramifications 
throughout the county, especially for areas and businesses that had positioned 
themselves to cater to tourists.  
Figure 3-5: Major Employers in the County of Kaua?i
28
 
Employer Name 
Location 
Employer Class Size 
County of Kaua?i 
Lihu?e 
1,000 ? 4,999 
Grand Hyatt Kaua?i 
Koloa 
500 - 999 
Wilcox Memorial Hospital 
Lihu?e 
500 - 999 
Marriott Kaua?i Resort 
Lihu?e 
500 - 999 
Princeville Resort 
Princeville 
250 - 499 
Wal-Mart 
Lihu?e 
250 - 499 
                                            
27
 
Source:  Hawaii State Data Book, Hawaii State Department of Business, Economic 
Development and Tourism
 
 
28
 
Source: Hawaii Workforce Informer, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, March 7, 
2008 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 66 
 
Sheraton 
Koloa 
250 - 499 
Kaua?i Medical Clinic 
Lihu?e 
250 - 499 
Point at Poipu 
Koloa 
250 - 499 
Hilton Kaua?i Beach Resort 
Lihu?e 
250 - 499 
Costco 
Lihu?e 
100 - 249 
Unemployment Rate 
Employment in the county increased slightly during the three year period 2005 ? 2007, 
with the addition of 1,000 jobs. During 2008 and 2009, however, 3,050 jobs were lost, a 
decline of 9.4% from the employment peak of 2007.
29
 
During the three year period 2005 - 2007, Kaua?i?s unemployment rates closely mirrored 
statewide statistics. However, beginning in 2008, unemployment in the County of Kaua?i 
increased at a higher rate than experienced throughout the rest of the State. The 
unemployment rate in the county ? which was at 2.7% in 2007 ? jumped to 9.3% by 
2009. Figure 3-6 below illustrates the increase in unemployment in both the County and 
the State during the entire five year period.  
Figure 3-6: Unemployment Rates: 2005 ? 2009
30
 
 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
State of Hawaii  
2.5% 
2.5% 
2.7% 
4.0% 
6.8% 
County of Kaua?i 
2.7% 
2.4% 
2.5% 
4.5% 
9.3% 
Geographic Distribution of Transit Need 
The map on the following pages illustrates the areas within the County of Kaua?i that 
likely have the greatest need for public transportation services.  
The Transit Dependency Index (Figure 3-7) represents concentrations of people who 
are most likely to need public transportation: seniors aged 65 or older, individuals with 
disabilities, and people with low income. This map displays the composite measure of 
these three indices. Figure 3-7 shows those parts of the focus area with the highest 
population and employment density. The highest population and employment areas 
typically generate the highest transit usage due in large part to the concentration of 
overall trips in these areas.  
                                            
29
 Source: Research and Statistics Office, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, State of 
Hawaii
 
30
 
Source: Hawaii Workforce Informer, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 67 
 
Figure 3-7: Transit Dependency Index Map
 
Key Activity Centers and Travel Patterns 
While there are no large urbanized centers in the County of Kaua?i, there are a number 
of nodes where population and activity centers are concentrated, namely around Lihu?e 
and Poipu on the south coast, Wailua and Kapa?a on the east coast. Most travel occurs 
within three miles of the coast, with the greatest concentration between these centers. 
In contrast to the travel patterns of tourists which are distributed throughout the coastal 
areas, low-income individuals, seniors and those with disabilities are most likely to travel 
between the government agencies, medical facilities and shopping areas in Lihu?e and 
the residential areas in the Wailua/Kapa?a region.  
In addition, the target population groups travel frequently within their own communities, 
where most of the essential services are located. However, due to the limited medical 
facilities and costly shopping areas available on the north shore, residents of Hanalei 
and Kilauea often need to travel to the east shore for those services. Some of the key 
destinations on the island include Kukui Grove Mall, Wilcox Memorial Hospital, 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 68 
 
neighborhood centers, and government agencies in Lihu?e. Major destinations are 
shown in Figure 3-8, the key activity center map. 
Figure 3-8: Key Activity Center Map 
 
 
 
3B. Existing Transportation Services 
Overview 
Transportation services in the County of Kaua?i are largely the responsibility of the 
County Transportation Agency (CTA). Besides the fixed-route and paratransit service 
provided by CTA, very limited accessible/affordable transportation is available, as 
follows:  
?  A small number of agencies provide transportation to their clients 
?  A few private providers provide demand response service 
?  Limited volunteer service 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 69 
 
The CTA is very well integrated into the social service network in the county and has 
historical roots in the Office on Elderly Affairs in the 1970s, primarily providing shopping 
and nutritional trips. Fixed-route service was initiated after Hurricane Iwa in 1982. 
Following Hurricane Iniki in 1992, considerable federal funding became available for the 
replacement of transit vehicles that had been destroyed. Due to the passage of the 
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prior to the hurricane, all vehicles purchased were 
lift-equipped. However, transit service at that time was largely unreliable due to the lack 
of fleet capacity to provide service seven days a week. As a result, service was cut back 
to six days a week, with a particular focus on 
cultivating a culture of transit usage among the 
younger generation. 
The CTA was officially established under the 
Office of the Mayor in 1995, and then was 
consolidated with the Agency on Elderly Affairs 
and the Housing Agency into the Offices of 
Community Assistance in 1999. These were later separated as individual agencies in 
2007. Since the 1990s, coordination has been an integral part of the transportation 
service model in the county, and most of the services described below are associated in 
some fashion with the CTA. 
Kaua?i Transportation Agency 
Transportation services provided to the target population are largely the responsibility of 
one entity, the County of Kaua?i Transportation Agency (or CTA). CTA provides both 
fixed-route (?The Kaua?i Bus?) and Paratransit services, in addition to Kupuna Care and 
agency subscription services. Following is a brief description of the service parameters. 
Fixed-Route:  Transit services are provided daily between Hanalei and Kekaha (in 
addition to Mana on an on-call basis). Weekday services are from 5:27 am to 10:40 pm, 
and weekends from 6:21 am to 5:50 pm. Limited on-call service is available for trips 
outside of these hours, particularly at the beginning and end of each bus run. Due to the 
recent success of the transit system in attracting new riders, the agency is no longer 
able to provide substantial numbers of route deviations as this would impact schedule 
adherence. The Kaua?i Bus used to deviate up to ten times daily to serve riders who 
were not able to access their fixed-route stops. Below is a summary of each of the 
Kaua?i Bus routes. They are illustrated in Figure 3-9. 
Lihue/Airport/Courthouse Shuttle ? Operates between 5:55 am and 10:05 pm, 
Monday through Friday, and between 7:55 am and 5:05 pm on weekends and holidays. 
Since the 1990s, coordination 
has been an integral part of the 
transportation service model in 
the county. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 70 
 
Each run is an hour apart. They begin at the Kukui Grove Mall and circulate through  
town, stopping at the airport, Kaua?i High School, the courthouse and other key 
destinations, with some on-call stops. 
Lihue Lunch Shuttle ? Operates between 10:30 am and 1:55 pm, Monday through 
Friday, circulating in central Lihue. 
Kekaha-Lihue/Lihue-Kekaha Mainline ? Operates between approximately 5:30 am 
and 10:30 pm, Monday through Friday, and approximately 7:30 am to 5:30 pm on 
weekends and holidays. This route includes on-call stops at the Pacific Missile Range 
Facility. Runs begin one hour apart. 
Koloa-Lihue/Lihue-Koloa Mainline ? Operates approximately 6:00 am to 6:00 pm, 
Monday through Friday, and approximately 7:20 am to 6:00 pm on weekends and 
holidays. Depending on the time of day, runs begin one or two hours apart. 
Koloa Shuttle ? Operates between 1:31 pm and 10:08 pm, circulating between Koloa, 
Kalaheo and Poipu, Monday through Friday only. Runs begin one hour apart. 
Hanalei-Lihue/Lihue-Hanalei Mainline ? Operates approximately 6:15 am to 10:40 
pm, Monday through Friday, and approximately 7:15 to 5:45 on weekends and holidays. 
Runs begin one hour apart, connecting Hanalei, Kilauea, Kapa?a, and Lihue. 
Kapa?a-Lihue/Lihue-Kapa?a Mainline ? Operates approximately 6:00 am to 9:35 pm, 
Monday through Friday, and approximately 8:00 am to 5:30 pm on weekends and 
holidays. Runs begin one hour apart, connecting Kapa?a and Lihue. 
Kapahi Shuttle ? Operates approximately 6:30 am to 10:00 pm, Monday through 
Friday, and approximately 7:00 am and 5:00 pm on weekends and holidays. Depending 
on the time of day, runs begin one or two hours apart, circulating through Kapa?a. 
Wailua-Lihue/Lihue-Wailua Mainline ? Operates on a limited run between 6:30 am 
and 6:30 pm, Monday through Friday only. It departs the Kapa?a/Wailua area twice in 
the morning and returns once in the afternoon and twice in the evening.  
 
 
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 71 
 
Figure 3-9: Kaua?i Transit Route Map 
 
 
Measures that have recently been taken to improve access to the target population 
include the addition of new bus routes, later weeknight and Sunday service
31
, on-call 
stops and park-and-rides, express bus service, and the installation of standee straps, 
retrievable securement systems,  and illuminated destination signs. In addition, as part 
of the ADA Bus Stops Improvement project, accessibility was improved at 50 stops 
throughout the island, and accessibility at the remaining 50 stops is expected to be 
completed by mid-2011. Fourteen vehicles have been added to the fleet in the recent 
fiscal year, and an additional seven vehicles have been purchased using federal 
funding. 
ADA Paratransit Service:  The CTA also provides ADA Paratransit service to those 
who are eligible. Until 1994, paratransit eligibility was largely based on self-declaration 
                                            
31
 
These increased service hours were implemented after the needs assessment for this Plan 
was complete.
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 72 
 
by applicants. The current ADA paratransit eligibility process is paper-based, with a 
requirement for medical verification. In addition, seniors can apply for eligibility based on 
a shorter paper application form. Although clients were provided service on separate 
vehicles in the 1990s, this is no longer the practice. A portion of the vehicle fleet is now 
intermingled between fixed-route and paratransit, and this has resulted in greater 
service efficiencies. Prior to providing service to a new registrant, an agency staff 
person conducts an assessment of the environment around the registrant?s home, in 
order to determine the type of vehicle needed to access the home. Service hours are 
comparable to those on fixed-route. Although 24-hour advance notice is officially 
required, limited same day service is also provided on a space available basis.  
The paratransit service uses the Transportation Manager from Shah Software Inc. to 
schedule trips. This software is geared towards rural and small urban paratransit 
systems, and the County reportedly is satisfied with the software?s performance. 
Kupuna Care: Kupuna (senior) Care paratransit services are provided to seniors 60 
years and older through an agreement with the County Agency on Elderly Affairs. In 
addition, a number of human service agencies have cost-sharing arrangements with the 
CTA to provide transportation to their program participants, such as Easter Seals/ARC 
and the County Recreation Agency. These are described in more detail below. 
Fare Structure: Fixed-route and paratransit fares are $2 for the general public and $1 
for seniors over 60 and youth 7 ? 18. However, nearly half the trips are paid for by 
Frequent Rider Passes. Until July 2010, these ranged from $20/month, to $90 for 6 
months, and $180 per year, but the agency has now increased the cost of the annual 
passes to $240. These fares also apply to paratransit users, but those who are ADA 
paratransit eligible only pay $1 for a paratransit ride. There are no free transfers allowed 
except onto Express buses in the early morning. Otherwise passengers must pay every 
time they board a bus. 
Since riders with disabilities under 60 years old are not entitled to the fare discount on 
fixed-route, there is a financial incentive for them to use paratransit rather than fixed-
route services. Personal care attendants ride for free on both modes. Some agencies 
such as the Boys and Girls Club, Work Wise and Nursing Home without Walls purchase 
bus passes for their clients. 
In addition to the fares described above, discounted fares are charged for shuttle 
services, which are fixed-route services in a designated area (Lihu?e area only, Kapahi 
area only, and Koloa area only). Since these are shorter trips, passengers pay $0.50 or 
$0.25 if they are seniors or youth.  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 73 
 
Funding Sources: The CTA is funded through the County General Fund, federal 
programs (5309, 5310 and 5311 and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 
program), and a State Assisted Transportation grant through the Agency on Elderly 
Affairs. In addition, the agency has cost sharing arrangements with a number of 
organizations, with varying degrees of cost recovery for the different contracts. 
Fleet Inventory: The Kaua?i Bus fleet consists of 50 vehicles, including nine 33 
passenger, six 31 passenger, and four 25 passenger vehicles. The remainder consists 
of smaller capacity buses. Although there is some shifting of modes between the 
vehicles, overall about 75% are used for fixed-route service, and 25% for paratransit. All 
vehicles are lift-equipped. 
Staffing: CTA employs approximately 50 full-time individuals, about 33 of whom are 
drivers (although five of these positions are currently frozen), in addition to 
approximately 30 part-time drivers. However, due to the State?s fiscal crisis, non-driving 
staff furloughs were scheduled for implementation at the time of the consultant team?s 
initial site visit. 
Operating Information: The operating budget in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009/10 was 
approximately $2.3 million for fixed-route service and $1.6 million for paratransit. The 
total capital budget (since some vehicles are used inter-changeably) for FY 2010/11 is 
$625,000. This will include the purchase of five new vehicles and bus stop 
improvements. The county provided approximately 430,000 one-way trips, traveling 
approximately 950,000 miles, on fixed-route, and 67,000 one-way trips, traveling 
approximately 500,000 miles, on paratransit in FY 2009/10. The average cost per trip on 
the fixed route service is approximately $5.30, while it is about $23.90 on the paratransit 
service,  The average cost per mile between the two services is much closer ? 
approximately $2.40 on fixed route and $3.20 on paratransit.  
Other Public Transportation Providers 
County Agency on Elderly Affairs 
Through the Kupuna Care program, the County Agency on Elderly Affairs contracts with 
CTA to provide service on a donation basis to about 140 seniors over 60. In addition, 
the agency provides limited transportation for medical trips through the services of 
approximately half a dozen volunteers.  
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 74 
 
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) 
The VA Community Based Outpatient Clinic (CBOC) provides primary health care to 
eligible veterans. The VA does not provide transportation directly. They refer most 
people to Kaua?i Transit/Elderly Affairs for assisted transportation program referrals. 
However, Disabled American Vets (DAV), a separate organization, provides a volunteer 
driver service to transport ambulatory veterans to and from their VA appointments. 
There are two drivers. The DAV has one vehicle in good condition. Rides must be 
requested 48 hours in advance, and transportation is provided on a first come first serve 
basis between 8am and 2pm. They typically only take one or two appointments in a day.  
Non-Profit Transportation Providers 
A number of non-profit organizations provide transportation through contracts with the 
CTA, where CTA provides the actual service and is reimbursed by the non-profit 
organizations. This includes Easter Seals and Kaua?i Adult Day Health (formerly 
Wilcox). In addition, some non-profit organizations provide limited service to their own 
clients. Examples include Easter Seals Adult Day Health Center (formerly ARC), Alu 
Like, Kaua?i Economic Opportunity (KEO), and Kaua?i Adult Day Health. Each of these 
is briefly described below. Further detail may be found in the transportation inventory. 
Easter Seals Hawaii 
Easter Seals provides home and community based programs to approximately 170 
youth under 20 who have developmental disabilities. The agency provides daily 
excursions to clients within the community. There is no charge to the clients for these 
services.  
Easter Seals also contracts with CTA?s paratransit program to provide service to up to 
75 individuals of all ages, but primarily under 20, for their community based program. 
These clients are located throughout the island from Waimea to Hanalei. They are 
transported on weekdays to one of Easter Seals? three sites. Not all clients attend 
programs five days a week. The teenagers through older adults (70 in total) who 
participate in the programs are all diagnosed as having a developmental disability, 
whereas the 100 child participants between 0 and 5 years of age are considered to 
have ?delays? based on a testing mechanism. There are currently no services available 
for those between 5 and the teenage years. The clients do not pay for the transportation 
services, as these are covered through Easter Seals? contract with CTA. Besides the 
service provided by CTA Paratransit, Easter Seals also provides service for day time 
excursions on the three vehicles.  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 75 
 
Kaua?i Adult Day Health Center (Easter Seals/ARC) 
ARC Kaua?i was started by five families in 1957 who realized there were no services for 
their children once they graduated out of Easter Seals programs (which started with the 
early childhood niche). The families created the adult day health program, which 
merged with Easter Seals in September 2009. Although Easter Seals/ARC has 70 staff 
members on the island, most of these work one on one with clients in the field, and only 
six work at the Adult Day Health (ADH) Center in Kapa?a. This is the only ADH program 
for adults with developmental disabilities on the island, although there used to be four 
programs.  
The ADH contracts with the County?s Paratransit program, paying the full cost of the 
trip, which is basically a pass through of state money since ARC is not able to provide 
transportation themselves. Thirty three of the 36 program participants are transported 
on Paratransit to the Center daily. Current clients come from Kekaha to Anahola, but in 
the past some have come from Kilauea. The clients receive door to door service, and 
none of them use assistive devices. 
The ADH program starts around 8:30am and ends at 2:30pm. Participants are 
transported on four Paratransit buses. Because the rides are shared and some people 
come from as far away as Kekaha, ride times for some passengers exceed 2.5 hours 
each way. 
ADH received federal funding for two vans. These were obtained through coordination 
with a CTA vehicle fleet purchase. The 14-passenger vans are from 2006 and 2007. 
They are used daily to provide excursions for the Center?s clients, and the destinations 
vary daily. Although the vans are not used on weekends, federal maintenance 
requirements would reportedly represent a barrier to sharing the vehicles with other 
agencies. 
Paratransit reportedly provides quality service to ARC clients, generally arriving within 5 
to 10 minutes of the scheduled pick-up time. Service is provided five days a week. 
Sometimes all the clients, including those who do not attend programs at the center, 
congregate at the Lihu?e office for an event. 
Kaua?i Economic Opportunity 
Kaua?i Economic Opportunity (KEO) provides a variety of services for older adults, 
individuals with disabilities and low-income residents. KEO has four programs with 
transportation related services: homeless housing program, homeless barrier removal 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 76 
 
program, group home for high functioning people with disabilities, and after-school 
program for ?at risk? youth. 
The homeless housing program has a care-a-van service that provides bus passes 
when funds are available. However, they ran out of funds for this year. The homeless 
barrier removal program, which started in June 2010, has funding for gas cards and bus 
passes. The primary justification for use must be employment. The program also has an 
11-passenger van (not accessible) to drive clients to job fairs and interviews and to 
apply for jobs.  
The group home has an 8-passenger accessible van for people who live in the group 
home in Kapa?a, but it is not used frequently. The afterschool program is for middle 
school aged children. The program has two 15-passenger vans and one 7-passenger 
van. Neither is wheelchair accessible. KEO also has a Meals-on-Wheels program under 
the auspices of Medicaid. 
Kaua?i Adult Day Health Center (KADH), Lihu?e 
This is the only agency in the county that provides a supervised daytime program for 
disabled adults and frail elderly, the majority of whom have dementia and Alzheimers. 
The agency is operated by Ohana Pacific Foundation and is funded in part by Kaua?i 
Agency on Elderly Affairs Kupuna Care Program. ADH is licensed for 50 clients, but not 
all attend the program daily. Close to ninety percent of their clients arrive on CTA?s 
paratransit vehicles, and one is transported from Hanalei on the fixed-route bus. Clients 
reside throughout the County of Kaua?i. They each purchase their bus passes 
individually. 
Bus service to and from the program does not align with the program hours. Although 
the agency?s program starts at 9:30am, some clients arrive as early as 7:15am because 
of the way the trips are scheduled. The program ends at 5pm, but the first bus arrives 
around 1:30pm and clients get picked up until 4:15 by buses.  
The KADH has two vehicles that are used for excursions, and all staff members are 
trained to drive these vehicles. One is an accessible 10-passenger van that is used 
twice weekly. The second vehicle is a six passenger minivan that is used for medical 
appointments, or if there is insufficient space on the main vehicle to transport 
passengers on excursions. 
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 77 
 
Alu Like 
Alu Like provides a comprehensive range of services and activities to fill identified 
needs in the Native Hawaiian community, including community economic development, 
business assistance, employment preparation, training, elder services, library services, 
and educational and childcare services for families with young children. Some of the 
programs are also open to non-Native Hawaiian residents. Close to one thousand 
residents are served each year. 
Transportation is provided for two of the programs, namely the elder service and the 
youth program. The elder service has two sites, one in Waimea that is used by about 20 
elders, and the second in Anahola that is used by about 10 elders. Some participants 
drive to the programs, while others use the Alu Like bus. 
Alu Like has two vehicles. One is used to provide service four days a week to elder 
programs in Waimea and Anahola. This is a 15-passenger van from approximately 
2000. The van is occasionally used on weekends, but cannot be used for non-
programmatic purposes due to the grant funding requirements. The van is also 
occasionally used to transport elders to medical appointments. The second vehicle is a 
seven-passenger 1997 minivan that is used to provide services to youth activities, 
primarily on the east side of Kaua?i. This vehicle is not used on a routine basis and is 
currently experiencing mechanical problems. Alu Like coordinates closely with the 
Agency on Elderly Affairs.  
Privately Operated Transportation Services 
Akita Enterprises 
Akita Enterprises provides transportation for schools; churches, sports groups and non-
profit excursions; and limited demand response non-emergency medical transportation 
(NEMT). The demand response NEMT service is provided during the hours when 
school transportation is not required. There is no NEMT service 6-8 am and 1-3 pm, 
Monday through Friday. Akita transports older adults, people with disabilities, and 
school children. People can call for a ride between 8am-4pm, Monday through Friday.  
Akita serves the entire island and has base yards for vehicles throughout the island. 
Typical trips are between Wilcox Memorial Hospital/Veterans Outpatient Clinic and the 
airport or between the hospital/airport and home. Social workers at the hospitals are 
aware of their service.  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 78 
 
Riders on Akita?s service self-pay, unless they are Medicaid-eligible. If Medicaid eligible, 
the service is paid for by the rider?s MedQUEST health plan. Fee for service is based on 
ride time, distance and time of day (evenings are more expensive). An evening trip 
between Waimea and Hanapepe is $108. The rate is by trip rather than number of 
passengers. Vehicles can accommodate two wheelchair users and 10 ambulatory 
adults as well as luggage.  
Akita has twelve 12-passenger accessible yellow school vans. They also provided 
regular service in the wake of Hurricane Iniki (1992). Akita used their tour buses to 
transport people in order to help keep the roads clear during disaster response. 
Kaua?i Medical Transportation 
Kaua?i Medical Transportation (KMT) offers non-emergency transportation for 
ambulatory as well as non-ambulatory clients with disabilities, using specially modified 
vans to accommodate wheelchairs or stretchers. They can provide transportation for a 
variety of reasons but typically provide medical transportation. Riders pay for the service 
themselves. The base rate is $50 for a one-way trip, adjusted by distance from Lihue. 
KMT is currently a provider for Evercare, a Med-QUEST health plan contractor. 
KMT has only been in operation since May, and as of July, they had served 10 to 15 
people. They have one wheelchair and gurney accessible vehicle. They have one full-
time driver, one part-time driver, and one part-time dispatcher. Driver training is 
provided informally in-house by the full-time driver, who is a former EMT. 
KMT is interested in expanding their service. 
Duplication of Service 
There appears to be very limited duplication of transportation services in the County of 
Kaua?i. In fact, the limited number of services is extremely well coordinated through the 
nexus of the County Transportation Agency. Most of the stakeholders are related in 
some manner to this agency, whether through existing contracts or the provision of 
services to their clients as individuals. While a small number of the private and non-
profit agencies have vehicles that are not utilized throughout the day, liability issues and 
different service needs appear to present barriers to greater utilization of their fleets. 
Additionally, there are opportunities for joint vehicle maintenance, insurance and 
purchase. 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 79 
 
3C. Transportation Needs Assessment 
The transportation needs identified in this section were derived from a variety of 
sources, including interviews with key stakeholders, analysis of the transit dependency 
map, input by the Local Mobility Workgroup, and a public workshop that was conducted 
in Lihu?e on August 27, 2010. The workshop was attended by 18 members of the public, 
in addition to transit agency, DOT and consultant staff. Participants were: 
?  Predominantly (81%) under 60 years of age 
?  Evenly split between those who lived on limited/fixed income and those who do 
not (keeping in mind that some of those who were not low-income may have 
been agency staff who represent low-income clients) 
?  Almost all participants indicated that they do not have a disability 
?  Almost two-thirds were associated with an agency or a transportation or social 
service provider  
?  While the overwhelming majority (78%) indicated that they drive, this reflects a 
lower percentage than the overall auto ownership of Kaua?i households (96%). 
Other key forms of transportation used by participants were being driven by 
family and friends as well as riding bicycles. 
Workshop participants were given a map exercise to identify their geographic 
distribution and the location of their most common destinations. Results showed that a 
third of the participants reside in the Lihu?e/Wailua/Kapa?a area, while the others were 
distributed from Hanapepe on the south shore to Kilauea in the north. Despite their 
scattered residential locations, almost half their common destinations were in the 
Lihu?e/Hanama?ulu area. This confirms that despite the fact that Kapa?a has the largest 
population of all urbanized areas on the island, for this group at least, the business/civic 
locations of the Lihu?e/Hanama?ulu area remain a strong attraction for trip destinations. 
Below is a summary of transportation needs and gaps for Kaua?i County. Note that 
these needs have not been filtered in terms of feasibility but are presented as the basis 
for developing mobility strategies later in this chapter. 
Assistance Needs  
Increase financial assistance for transportation 
?  Kaua?i Economic Opportunity and Catholic Charities provide bus passes for 
transit riders with limited incomes. However, the funding is not adequate to meet 
the demand, so they run out of funds to provide these passes each year.  
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 80 
 
?  There is also a need for financial assistance for other types of transportation 
when transit is not a viable option. This is particularly an issue when people get 
released from hospital and need door to door service as well as during hours 
when transit is not in operation. 
Improve public information 
?  Kaua?i residents expressed a desire for various types of information in various 
ways. They want more 
information about 
transportation options on the 
island, improved education 
and awareness of the 
availability of transit service 
and how to use it, more 
places to get the 
information, and provision of 
the information in more 
languages, especially for 
older Filipinos on the north 
shore and Marshallese and 
Spanish speakers throughout the county. 
 
More options for bus pass purchasing 
?  Currently, bus passes can only be purchased at the Lihue Civic Center and the 
CTA office. Residents expressed a desire to have additional places to purchase 
bus passes, such as bus transfer points, libraries, post offices, and banks, or 
perhaps even an online purchase option. 
Help with scheduling/coordinating trips 
?  Because information about transportation services is not always accessible or 
easy to understand for some people, residents expressed a desire for more 
hands-on help, which could be provided through a mobility manager, online trip 
planning and/or rideshare matching. 
Kaua?i residents want more information 
about transportation options on the 
island, improved education and 
awareness of the availability of transit 
service and how to use it, more places to 
get the information, and provision of the 
information in more languages. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 81 
 
 
Capacity Needs  
Increase volunteer driver capacity 
?  There are very few volunteer drivers on Kaua?i. Efforts to increase the volunteer 
driver pool are needed. 
Coordination Needs  
Remove barriers to vehicle sharing 
?  Though there are few agencies that provide direct transportation services, there 
are agencies that have vehicles available at off-hours and that could be used by 
other organizations to provide services during those hours. Concerns about 
liability need to be addressed in order to facilitate vehicle sharing.  
Eligibility Process Needs  
Refine eligibility process 
?  Access to paratransit services is determined by a registration process rather than 
a more detailed eligibility process. Since paratransit services are more expensive 
than fixed route services and some who are currently using the paratransit 
service could be riding fixed route, it may be useful to develop a more accurate 
ADA paratransit eligibility process to ensure that the paratransit services are 
available for the people that need it, moving others onto the fixed route system. 
Infrastructure/Facility/Capital Needs  
Increase number and type of vehicles available 
?  Social service organizations were interested in access to vehicles to help their 
clients get to medical appointments.  
?  Smaller vehicles are needed to access homes where there is limited turnaround 
space. Paratransit vehicles are not able to reach some homes currently, and 
there are no taxi or rental cars that are lift-equipped. The fact that there are no 
lift-equipped taxis or rental cars also impacts mobility outside the Kaua?i Bus and 
paratransit hours of operation. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 82 
 
?  There was also a suggestion that rideshare vehicles would be useful, such as 
vanpool vehicles, to help low-income residents get to work.  
Improve accessibility and safety for pedestrians, cyclists, low-speed vehicle 
drivers and transit riders 
?  Bus shelters were identified as an important need in this area. Accessible bus 
shelters are needed for future projects as well as at existing bus stops. 
?  Safety improvements are needed for pedestrians and cyclists as well, including 
curb cuts, crosswalks near bus stops, streetlights, sidewalks to bus stops and in 
high traffic resort towns, bike lanes or widened shoulders, and low-speed vehicle 
lanes. For instance, a dangerous walkway was identified in Hanapepe on the 
makai side of the highway before the hill to Ele?ele, and it was noted that there is 
not sufficient room for bikes or pedestrians between Kalaheo and Omao. 
Relieve congestion 
?  One person suggested that high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes are need, so 
buses won?t be slowed by congestion. 
Policy/Planning Needs  
Improve coordination and implementation of planning efforts 
?  There are many planning efforts related to the transportation system on Kaua?i 
and statewide. It was noted that these planning efforts should be coordinated in 
order to be effective. Additionally, these plans should not just sit on the shelf, and 
priority projects should be implemented. It was suggested that an agency or 
group should be identified to coordinate services and put this plan into action. 
Improve transportation accessibility through policy changes 
?  It was suggested that bikes should be allowed on buses because there is not 
enough room on the bike racks. This has resulted in problems for people who 
commute using a combination of cycling and public transit. These riders have 
needed to wait for the next bus when the racks are full, and in some areas, there 
is a long wait between buses. 
?  A policy was suggested to require or incentivize taxi and/or rental car companies 
to have some number of lift-equipped vehicles in their fleet. This would help local 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 83 
 
and visiting people with physical disabilities access transportation off paratransit 
hours. 
Address Medicaid compensation 
?  There are few Medicaid providers in the county, in part because of a reportedly 
difficult system to register as a Medicaid provider as well as low compensation 
for high touch trips, such as door-through-door or gurney service. 
Think long-term in planning 
?  Finally, when planning, consideration should be given to future needs, 10-50 
years out, in order to take into account the trend in growth the county has been 
experiencing as well as the public?s vision for the county?s future. 
Service Needs  
Provide access to transportation outside of current transit hours and at greater 
frequency within operating hours 
?  Residents expressed a need for Sunday service at the same level as Saturday 
service and evening service until 10pm. The evening service was especially 
important for people working part-time jobs or non-standard shifts.  The CTA 
quickly responded to this need, implementing these services as described here 
as of February 14, 2011. While all recognize that this is a great step forward, 
some concern still exists about the lack of evening service on weekends and 
holidays. Also, weekend service hours are limited, making weekend travel 
challenging. 
Increase transit service in underserved areas 
?  The frequency of bus service and points of access to transit were key issues 
raised by many people. More bus stops, particularly around Kapa?a, Kapahi, 
Kalaheo, Lawai, Koloa, Poipu, Lihue, Kekaha, along the north shore and through 
the Wailua Homesteads, are needed. Residents would like to see a shorter 
distance between stops as well as having them within a 10-minute walk of 
residential and commercial units in urban areas. They would also like to see 
more frequent bus service, every 15 minutes along the main highway and every 
30 minutes in rural areas. They think strategies to increase ridership would help 
to make this possible. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 84 
 
?  In addition to an increase in fixed route service, residents would like to have 
more accessible demand response service for the northshore, west side, Kapahi, 
Koloa, Hanalei, and Kekaha areas. 
Provide faster ride times 
?  At the same time as people would like more bus stops, they would like faster 
transit ride times between Kapa?a and Wailua Homesteads as well as paratransit 
ride times for some program clients. 
Provide service to key destinations 
?  Transportation for shopping, particularly for Costco, Kukui Grove Mall, Walmart, 
Koloa, and Poipu, was identified as an important need. However, public transit 
currently accesses all of these destinations other than Costco, so there may be 
some disconnect in public information. 
?  Accessible on-island and inter-island transportation is needed for medical care 
every day of the week. For on-island trips, this is especially important for people 
being discharged from the hospital and may not be able to use public transit 
either because of their condition or transit?s hours of operation. 
?  A commuter service is needed for people who work at the resort areas on the 
south shore of the island. Current levels of transit service do not meet all of the 
needs of these workers. 
Technology/Software Needs  
Use technology to support coordination between transit and private 
transportation providers 
?  Some interest in coordinating service between public transit and private taxi 
companies has been expressed. Having GPS devices on all of these vehicles, 
especially the taxis, would help the CTA to dispatch taxis to areas the buses 
can?t reach. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 85 
 
 
Training Needs  
Promote driver safety and help drivers meet the needs of riders with specific 
needs 
?  Driver safety was generally identified as a need for all agencies that operate their 
own transportation service. Training these drivers to be sensitive to older adults 
and people with various types of disabilities as well as how to help those 
individuals who use mobility devices was also thought to be needed.  
Prioritized Transportation Needs 
Public workshop participants were asked to select the three most important categories, 
and prioritize the needs within those categories. The top three categories chosen were 
service (78%), infrastructure (67%), and assistance (39%) needs. The prioritized list of 
mobility needs in these categories was reviewed by the Local Mobility Workgroup, 
which concurred with the prioritization of the workshop participants. The priority needs 
were again reviewed via a survey distributed in November 2010 and at a final public 
meeting to review the draft plan on June 29, 2011. Some refinement was made to the 
various needs as described in more detail above. 
A summary of the priorities is provided below.  
Service Needs 
Transportation service on Sundays and weekday evenings were easily rated the most 
important of all the needs identified, as shown in Figure 3-10. As previously mentioned, 
the CTA rapidly responded to this top priority need by extending evening service hours 
to 10pm and adding Sunday service as of February 14, 2011.  
These were followed by more bus stops, more frequent service, accessible inter-island 
service for medical trips, and commuter service. Figure 3-10 shows the full ranking of 
the needs in this category. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 86 
 
 
Figure 3-10: Most Important Service Needs
32
   
 
Service Needs 
Stakeholders indicated that improved sidewalk safety and bike lanes, followed by 
accessible bus shelters and lift-equipped taxis (or other vehicles in public service) are 
the most important infrastructure needs for the target population groups. Figure 3-11 
shows the full ranking of the needs in this category. 
 
 
Figure 3-11: Most Important Infrastructure, Facility & Capital Needs 
 
                                            
32
 A participant in the June 30, 2011, public meeting emphasized the need for more 
frequent service and more bus stops as a top priority. 
6%  (1)  
11%  (2)  
11%  (2)  
17%  (3)  
17%  (3)  
17%  (3)  
17%  (3)  
44%  (8)  
44%  (8)  
Reduce paratransit ride times/faster service 
Transportation for shopping 
Increased service in Koloa, Poipu, Lihue, 
Kekaha? 
More/shorter distance between bus stops 
More frequent service (esp. rural) 
Accessible inter-island transportation  
Commuter service (Poipu resort worker 
shuttle) 
Sunday service (like Saturday schedule) 
Evening service (until 10pm) 
6%  (1)  
11%  (2)  
11%  (2)  
11%  (2)  
11%  (2)  
33%  (6)  
39%  (7)  
44%  (8)  
44%  (8)  
HOV lanes 
Program vehicles for medical appointments 
Smaller vehicles to access hard-to-reach homes 
Shared ride vehicles 
Farmer?s market access 
Lift equipped taxis/vehicles 
More accessible bus shelters 
Improve sidewalk safety 
Bike lanes 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 87 
 
 
Assistance Needs 
The key assistance needs identified by stakeholders were increased opportunities for 
finding out about mobility options, and a range of strategies for providing financial 
assistance for those who are low-income. In particular, the lack of adequate bus fare 
assistance and taxi vouchers were cited as substantive mobility gaps. Stakeholders also 
stated that there was a need for more locations to obtain bus passes, including the 
possibility of on-line purchasing. Figure 3-12 shows the full ranking of the needs in this 
category. 
Figure 3-12: Most Important Assistance Needs 
 
 
3D. Strategies for Improved Service and Coordination 
This section describes local strategies designed to address the mobility gaps identified 
in the prior section of this plan. These strategies were initially developed by the 
consultant team based on interviews, public meetings, local mobility workgroup input, 
and past experience. During a local provider workshop held on November 8, 2010, the 
Local Mobility Workgroup and other transportation and social service providers refined 
and prioritized these strategies. The eight participants, listed in Appendix C, 
represented the majority of transportation providers in the County of Kaua?i. 
The strategies were prioritized into four categories, A-D, with A being the top priority 
category. In order to prioritize the strategies, workshop participants reviewed each 
strategy in terms of: 
?  The number of critical needs that could be met;  
6%  (1)  
6%  (1)  
11%  (2)  
17%  (9)  
28%  (6)  
33%  (6)  
33%  (6)  
33%  (5)  
50%  (3)  
Online trip planning 
Volunteer drivers 
Lanuage accessibility for bus riders 
Bus schedule help 
Mobility management 
Increased bus fare assistance  
Financial assistance/taxi vouchers 
More places to purchase bus passes/online 
More information ? mobility options/transit 
service 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 88 
 
?  Its financial feasibility;  
?  Feasibility of implementation; and  
?  The involvement of coordination, partnerships and potential community support.  
Workshop participants were limited to selecting three strategies each for categories A-
C, and all remaining strategies fell into category D. These decisions were made by 
consensus. The results of this process are described below, including brief descriptions 
of each strategy and the needs they are intended to address. Following is a description 
of the results of this process. 
Category A 
Strategy 
Description 
Need(s) Addressed 
HSTP Goals/ 
Objectives 
Addressed
33
 
Purchase of 
accessible 
vehicles 
This strategy includes 
capital projects to purchase 
wheelchair accessible 
vehicles to add to various 
providers? fleets in the 
County of Kaua?i.  
?  More lift-equipped 
vehicles 
?  Smaller vehicles 
to access homes 
where there is 
limited turnaround 
space 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2 
and 5 
?  Goal 4, 
Objective 5 
Subsidized 
taxi voucher 
program 
This strategy entails a user-
side subsidy for seniors 
and/or people with 
disabilities to allow for 
purchase of vouchers for 
taxi service. The number of 
monthly trips can be limited, 
and the subsidy can be set 
for specific budgetary 
amounts per annum. 
?  Allows individuals 
to have same day 
service that 
exceeds ADA 
paratransit 
requirements.  
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2 
and 5 
?  Goal 4, 
Objective 5 
Funding for 
free/reduced 
bus passes 
This strategy involves non-
profit organizations 
identifying and accessing 
additional sources of 
funding to provide deeper 
discounts on fares to their 
clients. 
?  Meet needs of 
low-income riders 
?  Goal 1, 
Objective 5 
                                            
33
 HSTP Goals and Objectives are detailed in Appendix D. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 89 
 
 
Category B 
 
Strategy 
Description 
Need(s) Addressed 
HSTP Goals/ 
Objectives 
Addressed 
Service 
expansion 
This strategy involves 
expanding fixed-route and 
paratransit service hours 
to include Sunday service 
similar to the Saturday 
and evening service 
beyond the current service 
day
34
. Expansion would 
also allow for increased 
frequency and service 
area and service provided 
by private and/or non-
profit shuttles. 
?  Evening and 
Sunday service 
?  Shorter distance to 
bus stops 
?  Current fixed-route 
services do not 
work for some 
employee needs 
?  Reduce ride time  
?  More accessible 
demand response 
service  
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2 and 
?  Goal 4, Objective 
Supple-
mental taxi 
service 
This strategy involves 
efforts to coordinate 
between taxis and 
paratransit service, 
including possible use of 
technology to allow for 
transfer of trip requests to 
taxis. Supplemental 
service could be used 
during hours when 
paratransit capacity is 
unavailable, but would 
need to be designed to 
ensure that current 
paratransit drivers? regular 
hours are not impacted.  
?  More efficient use 
of demand-
response vehicles  
?  More accessible 
demand response 
service for the 
northshore, west 
side, Kapahi, 
Koloa, Hanalei, 
and Kekaha  
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2 and 
?  Goal 4, Objective 
Hospital 
discharge/
This strategy may include 
establishing a contract 
?  Meets need of 
individuals going 
?  Goal 1, Objective 
                                            
34
 
This strategy has already been implemented, as of February 14, 2011. However, some 
service gaps still exist, including long periods between trips and lack of evening service on the 
weekends.
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 90 
 
medical 
return trip 
program 
with a provider that 
operates wheelchair 
accessible vehicles to 
provide subsidized rides to 
individuals who are being 
discharged from hospitals 
without having made 
transportation 
arrangements, or 
establishing a program 
that will allow individuals 
attending a medical 
appointment to be able to 
call a taxi rather than rely 
on paratransit for the 
return trip. 
to medical 
appointments with 
uncertain end 
times. ?Will calls? 
are currently 
allowed on 
paratransit, but 
this strategy would 
be useful for 
longer trips which 
may be difficult for 
paratransit on 
short notice 
?  Serves people with 
disabilities who are 
being discharged 
without having 
made 
transportation 
arrangements 
 
 
 
Category C 
 
Strategy 
Description 
Need(s) Addressed 
HSTP Goals/ 
Objectives 
Addressed 
Older 
Driver 
Wellness 
program 
 
This strategy involves 
publishing information and 
holding workshops 
focused on extending safe 
driving, and knowing how 
to locate alternative 
resources when they can 
no longer drive (based on 
the comprehensive 
American Society on 
Aging model). 
?  Serves seniors who 
currently drive and 
have not planned for 
alternatives once 
they terminate or 
reduce their driving 
?  Goal 1, Objective 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 91 
 
Additional 
Vehicles  
 
This is a capital strategy 
to provide additional 
vehicles for human 
service transportation 
providers to enable them 
to bring clients to medical 
and/or other trips, ideally 
sharing vehicles between 
agencies. 
?  Expands capacity to 
provide medical or 
other transportation 
in social service 
programs 
?  Goal 1, Objective 
Volunteer 
driver 
program 
 
This strategy would create 
volunteer driver programs, 
potentially through the 
RSVP program, Project 
Dana, Veteran's Affairs 
and/or other programs 
such as KCIL or KEO. 
?  Serves individuals in 
hours when 
paratransit/fixed-
route aren't 
operating 
?  Access to under-
served areas 
?  Allows for door-
through-door service 
?  Makes same day 
service an option 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2 and 
?  Goal 4, Objective 
 
Category D 
 
Strategy 
Description 
Needs Addressed 
HSTP Goals/ 
Objectives 
Addressed 
Informa-
tion and 
market-
ing 
 
This strategy would 
expand current 
marketing efforts for 
transit and other 
transportation services, 
such as creating a 
system bus route map, 
and marketing to specific 
groups. Some ideas 
include: on-bus 
information about other 
transportation services, 
on-line information and 
?  More information 
about mobility 
options 
?  Education and 
awareness of transit 
service 
?  Increase outreach 
?  Information at more 
places 
?  Visitor information  
?  Language 
accessibility for bus 
riders 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2 and 
?  Goal 4, Objective 
?  Goal 5, Objective 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 92 
 
scheduling, radio and 
newspaper advertising; 
flyer distribution to 
students; and 
?Ambassador? or bus 
buddy ?programs.  
South 
Shore 
Shuttle 
 
This strategy would 
establish a commuter 
shuttle to serve the 
employees of hotels and 
resorts in Poipu area. 
?  Current fixed-route 
services do not work 
for employee needs 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2 and 
?  Goal 4, Objective 
Travel 
training 
 
This strategy would 
develop programs with 
organizations whose 
clients may not be 
familiar with transit use 
in order to teach them 
how to use the bus. 
?  Better access to 
using fixed-route 
service 
?  Increase fixed route 
ridership 
?  Goal 1, Objective 
Casual 
carpool 
 
This strategy would 
develop a formal ride-
sharing program at 
senior housing facilities, 
retirement communities 
or other sites. 
?  Provides a form of 
volunteer driving 
contained within a 
senior or other 
defined community 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2 and 
?  Goal 4, 
Objectives 1 and 
Cost 
sharing 
with 
medical 
entities 
 
This strategy develops 
ways to require or 
encourage health care 
providers to share the 
costs of providing 
transportation as well as 
exploring potential for 
Medicaid reimbursement 
for paratransit trips to 
Medicaid eligible 
appointments. 
?  Increased funding to 
be used for 
paratransit services 
?  Provide more access 
to paratransit and 
private accessible 
transportation 
services 
?  Goal 1, Objective 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 93 
 
 
Auto 
financial 
assist-
ance
35
 
 
This strategy would 
include low-interest auto 
loans, assistance with 
insurance and 
maintenance costs. 
?  Addresses barriers to 
car use by low-
income drivers and 
seniors who can still 
drive 
?  Goal 1, Objective 
 
Additional Recommendations 
In addition to the strategies described above, the Workgroup supported the 
establishment of a more accurate paratransit eligibility screening process in order to 
ensure freeing up of capacity on paratransit for those who have no mobility alternatives. 
However, this was deemed a process recommendation rather than a strategy that would 
be ranked against those listed above. In addition, the Transit Advisory Committee is 
exploring the possibility of establishing free transit fares for those who are 60 or older 
and are not eligible for paratransit. 
Public Comment on Strategies 
All comments provided by the participants in the June 30 meeting were incorporated 
into earlier components of the plan. No categorically new strategies were identified. 
However, one participant emphasized that the Mayor?s Advisory Committee for Equal 
Access (MACFEA) and other ADA-related agencies and boards should be included in 
future coordination discussions and activities. 
                                            
35
 While participants also felt this was an important need, the fact that the cost per beneficiary would be so high 
resulted in a lower rank for this strategy. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 94 
 
Chapter 4. Maui County 
4A. Community Profile 
This chapter provides a description of the 
demographic trends in the County of Maui 
that reflect residents? travel patterns and auto 
dependency. This is followed by a discussion 
of the variety of transportation resources 
available to residents who are low-income, 
have a disability and/or are over 65 years of 
age. Finally, the chapter presents the 
prioritized transportation needs of these 
population groups and a list of coordinated transportation strategies. 
Study Area Description and Demographic Summary 
This demographic profile documents important characteristics about the County of Maui 
as they relate to this planning effort. In particular, the profile examines the presence and 
locations of older adults, individuals with disabilities, and low-income persons within the 
area.  
This aspect of the plan relies on data sources such as the United States Census and 
the Hawaii State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism. 
Census information from 2008 reflects population characteristics on a state and 
countywide level. Data pertaining to the individual communities is not available. We 
found that some relevant data points for this plan are only available for the year 2000. 
Where applicable, data for both 2000 and 2008 is shown. For each of the illustrating 
figures, the relevant data source is referenced. 
While new data has become available since writing this section of the report, it was 
determined that these data should remain in this report, as it is the same set of data 
used for the Hawaii Statewide Transportation Plan, More current data will be used in the 
updates of both of these plans. It is important to note that this information is provided 
only to develop a general understanding of the area in which this Coordination Plan will 
be applied. It will not be used in making FTA grant funding decisions. 
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 95 
 
Population Overview 
With a land area of just over 1,159 square miles, the County of Maui is comprised of the 
islands of Maui, Lanai, Molokai, Molokini and Kahoolawe. Population density for the 
County is 110.5 persons per square mile. Tourism is the County?s major industry.  
Wailuku is the county seat. Other population centers are shown in Figure 4-1 below: 
Figure 4-1: Population Centers
36
 
Location 
Population 
Island 
Kahului 
20,146 
Maui 
Kihei 
16,749 
Maui 
Wailuku (County Seat) 
12,296 
Maui 
Lahaina 
9,118 
Maui 
Pukalani 
7,380 
Maui 
Waihee 
7,300 
Maui 
Lanai City 
3,164 
Lanai 
Kaunakakai 
2,726 
Molokai 
As the list above illustrates, the vast majority of county residents live on the island of 
Maui. Census 2000 figures report that 91.7% (117,644) live on Maui while 8.2% 
(10,597) reside on Lanai and Molokai. The focus of this plan will be the island of Maui. 
The primary focus of the Coordinated Public Transit ? Human Services Transportation 
Plan is to improve transportation options for three target populations ? seniors, persons 
with disabilities and people with low incomes. Individuals in these groups typically have 
less access to personal vehicles as their primary form of transportation. Transit 
dependent individuals can experience an especially difficult time in non-urban areas 
with low population densities and limited public transit services. Figure 4-2 presents 
population data for the County of Maui and the State of Hawaii as a whole. 
 
 
 
 
                                            
36
 
Source: U.S. Census, 2008 American Community Survey
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 96 
 
Figure 4-2: Basic Population Characteristics: 2000 to 2008
37
 
 
Total 
Population 
Persons aged 
65+ 
Persons with 
Disability, age 5+ 
Persons at or 
below  
Poverty Level 
 
State of Hawaii 
Census 2000 
1,211,537 
160,601 
13.3% 
199,819  16.4%  126,154  10.7% 
2008
 
Estimate 
1,288,198 
190,067 
14.8% 
Not available 
115,937  9% 
County of Maui 
Census 2000 
128,241 
14,676 
11.4% 
23,820 
18.5%  13,252 
10.5% 
2008
 
Estimate 
143,691 
17,428 
12.1% 
12,932 
9% 
11,495 
8% 
Older Individuals 
As shown in Figure 4-2 above, 12.1% of the residents of Maui County in 2008 were age 
65 and older. This is lower than the statewide figure of 14.8%. However, the proportion 
of seniors is projected to increase substantially over the next 25 years, as is shown in 
Figure 4-5 on page 94. 
Individuals with Disabilities 
In Maui County, among people at five years of age and older in 2008, 9% reported a 
disability, according to the American Community Survey, 2008. However, the 
prevalence of having a disability varied depending on age, from 3% of individuals 
between 5 and 15 years, to 7% of those 16 to 64 years, and to 34% of those 65 years 
and older. 
Individuals at or Below Poverty Level 
U.S. Census estimates for 2008 report median household income in Maui County at 
$64,150, which is slightly lower than the state average of $66,701. As of 2008, the 
County reported 8% of all residents were living below the poverty line compared to 9% 
statewide. Five percent of individuals 65 years and over were below the poverty level. 
Access to a Vehicle 
As reported in the American Community Survey 2008, Maui County has a lower 
percentage of households without a car (5.4%) than the state as a whole (8.7%). 
Traditionally, individuals who rent a home are far less likely than homeowners to have 
                                            
37
 
Source: U.S. Census, 2008 American Community Survey
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 97 
 
access to a car. In addition, households headed by a person age 65 years and older are 
less likely to have access to a car than other households. 
Homeless Population 
The homeless population on Maui increased slightly between 2005 and 2007. Based on 
Homeless Point-in-Time surveys conducted by the State of Hawaii Public Housing 
Authority
38
, there were 747 homeless individuals in 2005. The point-in-time count 
conducted in 2007 reported 764 people. These figures include both sheltered and 
unsheltered individuals. 
Persons with low-incomes, including those who are homeless, typically have 
transportation challenges that impede their ability to reach employment, training, or 
other necessary services. The expense of owning and maintaining a vehicle may be 
beyond reach for this population, and for some, even the cost of riding public 
transportation may be prohibitive. 
Race and Ethnicity 
No racial group residing in the County of Maui constitutes a majority. Figure 4-3 shows 
the distribution of the population by race. 
Figure 4-3: Maui Population by Race 
 
 
                                            
38
 Source: Homeless Point-in-Time Count, 2007, State of Hawaii, Hawaii Public Housing 
Authority 
AIAN 
American Indian or Alaskan Native 
 
NHPI 
Native
 Hawaiian Pacific Islander 
 
2+ Races 
People who self-identified as being two or more races 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 98 
 
The Hispanic/Latino population, which accounts for 10 percent of the population, is not 
included in the chart above because it is an ethnicity and not tracked as a separate 
race.
39 
  
In the County of Maui, 28% of people at least 5 years of age reported that they spoke a 
language other than English at home. Of this group, 48% said that they did not speak 
English ?very well.? 
Population Trends for the Island of Maui and County of Maui 
The County of Maui is experiencing continuing and sustained population growth. The 
County recorded a population of 128,241 residents in 2000
40
. In 2007, the estimated 
population increased to 141,523.  
The Hawaii State Department of Business, Economic 
Development and Tourism projects that more than 
169,000 people will call Maui County home by 2020, 
and by 2030, the population will reach approximately 
190,000, with the vast majority of people residing on 
the island of Maui.  
Figure 4-4 below shows population trends by 
community for Maui Island. The Maui Island Plan, updated by the County in 2009, 
projects that some regions on the island (Wailuku ? Kahului) will experience significant 
increases while others (Hana) are expected to grow by a only few hundred people. The 
expected growth shown below represents an annual rate on Maui Island of 1.46%, 
which equates to a 36.5% population growth over the 25 year period. 
Figure 4-4: Maui Island Community Population Projections 2005 ? 2035
41
 
Community 
2005 
2015 
2020 
2025 
2030 
Lahaina 
19,852 
22,627 
24,326 
25,904 
27,419 
Kihei - Makena 
25,609 
29,731 
32,208 
34,528 
36,767 
Wailuku ? Kahului 
46,626 
54,374 
59,010 
63,363 
67,565 
Makawao-Pukalani-Kula 
23,176 
25,360 
26,792 
28,077 
29,294 
Paia-Haiku 
12,210 
12,474 
12,764 
12,973 
13,151 
Hana 
1,998 
2,173 
2,290 
2,393 
2,429 
TOTAL MAUI ISLAND 
129,471 
146,739 
157,390 
167,239 
176,625 
                                            
39
 U.S. Census, 2006 ? 2008 American Community Survey 
40
 
U.S. Census 2000 
41
 
Source:  Draft Maui Island Plan, County of Maui, 2009
 
The percentage of older 
adults is projected to 
increase from 11.9% in 
2007 to 23.6% in 2030. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 99 
 
The general population growth of the County (including Maui, Lanai and Molokai) during 
the next two decades is important to compare to related increases in older residents 
during the same period of time. Figure 4-5 below shows the county-wide growth of all 
residents as well as of residents 65 and older. The percentage of older adults is 
projected to increase from 11.9% in 2007 to 23.6% in 2030.  
Figure 4-5: County Population Projections: 2007 ? 2030 for Older Adults
42
 
County of Maui 
2007 
2015 
2020 
2025 
2030 
TOTAL MAUI COUNTY 
141,523 
158,043 
169,066 
179,404 
189,300 
Population 65 and over 
16,895 
24,554 
31,326 
38,556 
44,672 
Population 65 and over as 
11.9% 
15.5% 
18.5% 
21.5% 
23.6% 
Economic Indicators in the County of Maui 
The following section contains economic information pertaining to the County of Maui, 
including unemployment rates, major employers in the county and employment 
changes. 
County of Maui Employment 
The visitor industry is the largest employment sector in the County of Maui. However, 
the Maui Island Plan indicates that the past rate of growth in resident population, 
housing and jobs is higher than the rate of visitor growth, thus signaling a more 
diversified economy that is less driven by tourism than Hawaii and Kaua?i counties. 
Employment in the County increased steadily during the three year period 2005 ? 2007, 
with the addition of 3,650 jobs. This increase is offset however by the 7,200 jobs that 
were lost during the 2008-2009 time period. This employment reduction represents a 
9.3% decline from the employment peak in 2007.
43
 In addition, news reports an 
unidentified number of job losses due to lay-offs at Maui Land & Pineapple and 
Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company plant closure in Paia.  
As shown in Figure 3-6 below, major employers are located in Wailuku, Kahului Kihei, 
and Lahaina. The Wailuku-Kahului area is the economic and the population center of 
                                            
42
 
Source:  Hawaii State Data Book, Hawaii State Department of Business, Economic 
Development and Tourism
 
43
 Source: Research and Statistics Office, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, State of 
Hawaii
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 100 
 
the island. Forecasts predict that it will remain so, experiencing a faster growth rate than 
other areas on Maui. The Lahaina region enjoyed significant job growth during the 
1990?s and this is projected to continue through 2030. The Kihei area has seen growth 
in the visitor economy and this trend is expected to continue. 
Employment opportunities in Upcountry Maui are limited, and according to the Maui 
Island Plan, the majority of the area?s residents commute outside the area for jobs. 
Projections indicate that by 2030, there will be only one local area job per 2.1 
households, which means Upcountry residents will continue to commute to work. 
Figure 4-6: Major Employers in the County of Maui
44
 
Employer Name 
Location 
Employer Class Size 
Town Realty of Hawaii 
Wailuku 
1,000 ? 4,999 
Grand Wailea Resort Hotel 
Kihei 
1,000 ? 4,999 
Hyatt Regency-Maui Resort/Spa 
Lahaina 
500 - 999 
Maui County Mayor Office 
Wailuku 
500 - 999 
Four Seasons ? Maui 
Kihei 
500 - 999 
Maui Memorial Medical Ctr 
Wailuku 
500 - 999 
Maui Land & Pineapple Company 
Kahului 
500 - 999 
Ritz Carlton ? Kapalua 
Lahaina 
500 - 999 
Westin ? Maui Resort 
Lahaina 
500 - 999 
University of Hawaii ? Maui College 
Kahului 
500 - 999 
Wal-Mart 
Kahului 
500 - 999 
Hale Makua 
Kahului 
250 - 499 
Manele Bay Hotel 
Lanai City 
500 - 999 
Unemployment Rate 
During the three year period 2005 - 2007, Maui?s unemployment rates closely mirrored 
statewide statistics. However, in 2008 and 2009, unemployment in the County of Maui 
increased at a higher rate than experienced throughout the rest of the State. Figure 4-7 
below provides the increase in unemployment rates in both the County and the State 
during the entire five year period.  
 
                                            
44
 
Source: Hawaii Workforce Informer, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, March 11, 
2008
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 101 
 
Figure 4-7: Unemployment Rates: 2005 ? 2009
45
 
 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
State of Hawaii 
2.5% 
2.5% 
2.7% 
4.0% 
6.8% 
County of Maui 
2.6% 
2.4% 
2.8% 
4.5% 
8.6% 
Geographic Distribution of Transit Need 
The map on the following pages illustrates the areas within the County of Maui that 
likely have the greatest need for public transportation services.  
The Transit Dependency Index (Figure 4-8) represents concentrations of people who 
are most likely to need public transportation: seniors aged 65 or older, individuals with 
disabilities, and people with low income. This map displays the composite measure of 
these three indices. Figure 4-8 shows those parts of the focus area with the highest 
population and employment density. The highest population and employment areas 
typically generate the highest transit usage due in large part to the concentration of 
overall trips in these areas.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                            
45
 
Source: Research and Statistics Office, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, State of 
Hawaii
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 102 
 
 
Figure 4-8: Island of Maui Transit Dependency Index Map 
 
Key Activity Centers and Travel Patterns 
The Island of Maui has several major trip generators such as tourist lodging, social and 
medical facilities, retail sites, and government offices. The population and activity 
centers on Maui are located primarily in the areas of Kahului-Wailuku, Kihei, and 
Lahaina. The majority of trips occur in Kahului and Wailuku, which are the centers for 
government, medical service, and retail sales. The main transit transfer hub is located at 
the Queen Ka?ahumanu Center in Kahului. Target groups of seniors, individuals with 
disabilities and persons with low income need to access services and jobs in Kahului 
and Wailuku, necessitating travel from Upcountry and other parts of the Island. Key 
destinations on the island include the Queen Ka?ahumanu Center and other shopping 
destinations, University of Hawaii Maui College, Maui Memorial Medical Center 
Wailuku, and the government center in Wailuku. Lahaina is a key tourist destination, 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 103 
 
especially on days when cruise ships are in port in Kahului, and is a major employment 
center. 
Figure 4-9: Island of Maui Key Activity Center Map 
 
 
4B. Existing Transportation Service
 
Background 
The County of Maui Department of Transportation (MDOT) is responsible for the vast 
majority of transportation services in the county. MDOT administers Maui Bus, which 
was created in 2002 to provide an island-wide public transportation system. Maui Bus 
operates seven days per week, including holidays. MDOT also operates the curb-to-
curb ADA complementary paratransit service and provides funding for other specialized 
services through contracts with Maui Economic Opportunities (MEO). These programs, 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 104 
 
as well as other human service transportation programs, are described in more detail 
below.  
Transportation for the target populations that are the focus of this coordinated plan 
primarily is funded through the use of County monies. In FY 2011, the County will spend 
over $14 million on transportation for various programs including: 
?  fixed route 
?  commuter 
?  paratransit 
?  dialysis and non-emergency medical transportation 
?  youth transportation 
?  nutrition/leisure 
?  employment 
?  Head Start 
?  adult day care 
County Highway Funds from gas tax are allocated for the operation of public transit. 
County General Funds from property tax (hotel) are used to fund trips provided by MEO.  
Transportation Funded by the County of Maui 
Fixed Route and Commuter Service 
Maui Bus fixed route system consists of 12 routes, all of which are operated by Roberts 
Hawaii. All vehicles are ADA accessible and are equipped with two bicycle racks. The 
routes vary in hours of operation, roughly from 5:30 AM to 10:00 PM, in and between 
communities in Central, South, West, Haiku and Upcountry areas:  
?  Routes 1 and 2 Wailuki Loop; 5 and 6 Kahului Loop: Provide circulator service in 
Central Maui, with connections at the Queen Ka?ahumanu Center Hub 
?  Route 10 Kehei Islander:  Central Maui connecting South Maui via Ma?alaea 
?  Route 15 Kihei Villager:  Within South Maui connecting with Route 20 in 
Ma?alaea to West Maui 
?  Route 20 Lahaina Islander:  Central Maui connecting West Maui via Ma?alaea 
?  Route 23 Lahaina Villager:  Within West Maui connecting with Routes 20 and 25 
?  Route 25 Ka?anapali Islander:  Service to Ka?anapali from Lahaina 
?  Route 30 Napili Islander: Service to Kapalua from Ka?anapali 
?  Routes 35 Haiku Islander and 40 Upcountry Islander:  Service to Haiku and 
Upcountry Maui 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 105 
 
Roberts Hawaii is also the contract service provider for the four Maui Bus commuter 
routes. Service is available seven days a week, including holidays, with morning and 
afternoon runs. Reservations are required for the following commuter routes: 
?  Haiku-Wailea Commuter (5:40 AM ? 7:05 AM; 4:15 PM ? 6:00 PM) 
?  Makawao -  Kapalua Commuter (5:40 AM ? 7:50 AM; 4:00 PM ? 6:30 PM) 
?  Wailuku ? Kapalau Commuter (5:30 AM ? 8:15 AM; 2:45 PM ? 5:45 PM) 
?  Kihei ? Kapalua Commuter (6:15 AM ? 7:45 AM; 4:05 PM ? 5:35 PM) 
Figure 4-10: Maui Fixed Route Bus Service Map 
 
Paratransit 
The Maui Bus paratransit service is an advanced reservation, curb to curb service for 
persons who are unable to use the regular fixed-route Maui Bus. The days and hours of 
paratransit service are the same as for the fixed route service. Eligibility for the ADA 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 106 
 
complementary service is determined by the County using a paper-based application 
process requiring medical verification.  
MDOT contracts with Roberts Hawaii to provide paratransit services. For FY 2011 the 
County has allocated $375,000 for paratransit services. The fleet consists of 15 
vehicles, including 10 paratransit buses with four wheelchair positions, three 25-
passenger buses with two wheelchair positions, and two 5-passenger sedans. 
Fare Structure 
Passenger fare is $1.00 per boarding for all fixed routes and paratransit. No transfers 
are given on any of the routes. Infants under the age of 2 travel free when riding on the 
lap of an adult. 
Monthly passes are available from bus drivers and at the County Business Resource 
Center and the Wharf Cinema Center Management Office. General boarding passes for 
all routes are $45.00 per month; passes for students and seniors (55 and older) are 
$30.00. The passes include commuter and paratransit services.  
Restricted passes for the Loop and Villager routes (routes 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 15 and 23) are 
$20.00 per month and include paratransit services. 
Commuter fares are $2.00 per one-way trip and there is no charge for transfers to other 
Maui Bus commuter routes. Commuter passes are also available for $45.00 per month 
and include all routes, including commuter. 
Additional County-Funded Programs 
In addition to fixed route, commuter and paratransit services, MDOT also funds a variety 
of specialized transportation. Over $5 million has been allocated to the following 
programs in the FY 2011 budget. MEO is the contracted service provider, receiving 
approximately 93% of its funding for transportation programs from the County. Service 
provided by MEO is free to the rider. 
Dialysis Transportation 
This program provides both curb to curb or door through door service for clients who 
need transportation to dialysis treatment or non-emergency medical appointments. 
MEO operates service Monday through Saturday, utilizing wheel chair buses staffed by 
specially trained Passenger Assistant Technicians. Over 120 individuals are served, 
accounting for 6,000 boardings per month.  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 107 
 
Adult Day Care 
Monday through Friday (except holidays), MEO operates services to Maui Adult Day 
Care Centers in Central Maui and Lahaina. This is curb to curb service for ambulatory 
clients. Four buses are used in Central, West, and South Maui and Upcountry. 
Kalima 
This program provides transportation to 30 adults with chronic mental disabilities, 
developmental disabilities or physical disabilities and who require specialized 
assistance during transit. The service runs Monday through Friday and is operated by 
MEO. Upcountry and Central Maui use two buses each, while South Maui uses one 
bus.  
Employment Transportation 
Operated by MEO, this service is designed to give adults with disabilities access to jobs 
within their community. Curb to curb service is available in Central and South Maui, five 
days per week, except holidays, during normal business hours. Consumers include 
individuals with chronic mental illness, physical or developmental disabilities. Two buses 
are used daily. 
Head Start 
This curb to curb service transports low income, pre-school aged children from selected 
locations on Maui to various MEO Head Start sites. Vehicles comply with national Head 
Start regulations by providing special seatbelt outfits. MEO is the contracted service 
operator. Service is available five days per week when classes are in session in the 
following locations: 
?  Kahului (1 bus) 
?  Wailuku (1 bus) 
?  Kihei (1 bus) 
?  Lahaina (1 bus) 
Nutrition Programs 
This curb to curb service transports elderly individuals to nutrition and recreational 
programs. MEO operates the service Monday through Friday as shown below: 
?  Central Maui (4 buses, 5 days per week) 
?  Makawao (2 buses, 2 days per week) 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 108 
 
?  Humiimaile (1 bus, 2 days per week) 
?  Pukalani (1 bus, 2 days per week) 
?  Kula (2 buses, 2 days per week) 
?  Paia-Haiku (1 bus, 2 days per week) 
?  Kihei (2 buses, 2 days per week) 
?  Lahaina-Honolua (2 buses, 2 days per week) 
Youth Programs 
Youth Transportation is designed to serve children between the ages of 9 ? 18 by 
providing after-school service to public programs and facilities such as Boys and Girls 
Clubs, Youth Centers, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, etc. Youth may take advantage of 
transportation home that is provided with this program. Youth groups may use this 
service up to two times each year for field trips or excursions. 
Service is available to all youth year round, including during intersession and summer 
when schools are closed. Schedules can vary from those offered on school days. MEO 
operates the service in the following areas: 
?  Central Maui (2 buses, 5 days per week) 
?  South Maui (2 buses, 5 days per week) 
?  West Maui (1 bus, 5 days per week) 
?  Upcountry (2 buses, 5 days per week) 
Other Transportation Programs  
Additional agencies on Maui provide limited transportation services, usually solely for 
their own programs and clientele. Their operating characteristics are summarized in 
Appendix A, the provider inventory.  
Aloha House, Inc.  
Aloha House, Inc., Malama Family Recovery Center, and Maui Youth and Family 
Services, Inc. are three separate 501(c) 3 agencies that share board members and a 
common management structure. Together the agencies provide some transportation for 
their clients, utilizing vans and minivans. The aging fleet consists of one 5310 15-
passenger van purchased approximately eight years ago, and four additional 12 ? 15 
passenger vans purchased using agency funds.  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 109 
 
 
The Arc of Maui 
This private non-profit organization provides services for persons with disabilities, their 
advocates and families. The Arc offers adult 
day programs, personal assistance, chore 
services, residential services, job placement 
and vocational training. The agency serves 
approximately 60 clients per day for the day 
programs. The agency receives a 
percentage of funding per client from the 
Medicaid Waiver program for transportation 
services to help defray costs. The Arc fleet 
on Maui consists of four mini-vans, three lift 
equipped cutaways and one passenger car. 
Easter Seals of Hawaii 
Easter Seals is a nationwide non-profit organization that operates adult day health 
services on Maui. The agency serves 60 adults with developmental disabilities from the 
ages of 18 and up. Most clients use County-funded services provided by MEO, however 
Easter Seals does have five vans to transport day program people in the community. In 
addition, staff members use personal vehicles to transport consumers. The agency 
provides mileage reimbursement in such cases.  
Transportation Services on Molokai and Lanai 
Service details and descriptions of needs on the two outer islands of Maui County were 
provided by stakeholders who work with or represent the populations of those islands.  
Working with representatives of the County and of human service agencies that serve 
Lanai and Molokai, the consulting team attained an understanding of the circumstances 
of those islands. The detail provided below outlines the current services available. The 
County works with its largest provider, MEO, to operate services on Lanai and Molokai 
through its contract that also covers services on Maui. The County, MEO, and other 
human service agencies represented the interests of Lanai and Molokai very thoroughly 
throughout the planning process.  
On Lanai, MEO operates services, through its contract with the County of Maui, 
primarily for seniors and persons with disabilities. Most trips are of short duration, taking 
While all transportation options 
available to Maui residents are 
well utilized, stakeholders 
indicated a need for more funding 
for more services. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 110 
 
riders from their homes to program sites and back home again. The majority of 
consumers live in and around Lanai City, accounting for a population of approximately 
3,500. During the period July 2009 ? June 2010, MEO provided 5,500 trips using one 
vehicle. An additional vehicle has recently been placed in service. MEO also operates a 
shopping shuttle approximately twice per month to bring Lanai residents to Maui. 
Transportation is coordinated on both ends of the trip and a reduced ferry fare is offered 
($10.00 each way compared to the regular one-way fare of $25.00). 
Because Molokai?s population is spread out across the island, there is a need for 
service that begins or ends in Kaunakakai and goes out to both ends of the island. 
During Fiscal Year 2009, MEO operates a variety of programs that were funded by the 
County of Maui. All services are provided free of charge. The Rural Shuttle and 
Expanded Rural Shuttle are available to the general public, while the Nutrition Program, 
the Youth Transportation Program and the Ala Hou Program require registration.  MEO 
provided 24,000 trips on its two public shuttles that operate Monday through Friday. 
MEO also operates a youth shuttle that accounted for 23,000 trips. MEO also provides 
Medicaid transportation to Medicaid eligible riders as approved by the Department of 
Human Services (DHS). 
Duplication of Services 
With the current mix of transportation programs available on Maui, there appears to be 
little duplication of service. The growth in ridership of fixed route, commuter and 
paratransit has been substantial since the introduction of the Maui Bus system. Services 
funded by the County and operated by MEO are well established and used by human 
service agencies and their clients across the island. While all transportation options 
available to Maui residents are well utilized, all stakeholders indicated a need for more 
funding for more services. 
One area in which stakeholders identified a duplication of service is the registration or 
eligibility process required for services. Consumers may be required to submit up to 
three separate applications in order to access services provided by the County (Maui 
Bus paratransit), MEO (multiple programs), and the Kaunoa Senior Center. 
4C. Transportation Needs Assessment 
The following needs assessment was initially developed from interviews with 
stakeholders on Maui, as well as data review, and review of other studies and reports. 
These reports include:  
background image
 
P a g e
 | 111 
 
?  Hawaii Department of Transportation, Coordinated Public Transit-Human 
Services Transportation Plan, July 2008. 
?  County of Maui Short Range Transit Plan, January 2005.  
?  Maui Island Plan, May 2010. 
During group meetings, in-person interviews and conference calls, stakeholders were 
given the opportunity to describe the role their organizations play in providing or 
arranging transportation, the budget and level of service provided, and any perceptions 
or experiences with unmet transportation needs or gaps in services specific to the 
clientele served by the agency. It is important to note that the summary reports reflect 
the views, opinions, and perceptions of those interviewed. The resulting information was 
not verified or validated for accuracy. 
This needs assessment was reviewed and confirmed through additional consultation 
with key stakeholders, as well as review with members of the public at two workshops 
held at the Maui Beach Hotel on September 16, 2010. The meeting for the general 
public was from 9:00 AM ? 11:30 AM, while the Mobility Workgroup met from 1:00 PM ? 
3:00 PM. 
Below is a summary of transportation needs and gaps for Maui County. Note that these 
needs have not been filtered in terms of feasibility but are presented below as the basis 
for developing mobility strategies later in this chapter. 
Service Needs 
Improve awareness of transportation services 
?  While all stakeholders were aware of the fixed route and commuter service 
provided by Maui Bus, many agencies indicated a lack of understanding on the 
part of both their staff and clients of the paratransit services provided by Maui 
Bus. Some agency representatives did not realize that ADA paratransit 
transportation provided by Maui Bus was an option in addition to trips provided 
by MEO.  
?  It has been noted that veterans and others with disabilities have limited 
knowledge of transportation options available for them, and they may not be 
likely to ask for the information. This is particularly important for veterans 
because the one Disabled American Veterans van on Maui does not have a 
wheelchair lift, so other options need to be known. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 112 
 
 
Implement guaranteed rides in trips scheduled with MEO 
?  Stakeholders expressed concerns that trips scheduled with MEO are not 
guaranteed and thus clients are not able to attend programs or keep scheduled 
appointments. Factors mentioned that affect the provision of trips by MEO 
include excess capacity and MEO?s holiday schedule. 
Expand service types 
?  Stakeholders indicated a growing need for transportation that goes beyond curb-
to-curb service provided by MEO, including door through door assistance as well 
as aides or personal attendants who travel with consumers. The need for more 
wheelchair accessible vehicles was also discussed. Some agencies stated a 
need for their clients who do not qualify for services provided by MEO. 
Expand service area 
?  The public transit service provided by the Maui Bus serves much of the island, 
however, the need for increased service to outlying areas, especially Upcountry, 
was discussed by various agency representatives. Bus stops on Baldwin Avenue 
and in Waihee community, shuttle service to bus stops and the Transit Center in 
Kahului , and service along the road to Hana where many low-income families 
and people with disabilities reside were mentioned as specific unmet needs. 
Training Needs 
Expand opportunities to coordinate training  
?  Some stakeholders expressed an interest in coordinating activities with other 
human services organizations, especially the sharing of driver training resources, 
specifically in the area of securement. In addition, some agencies indicated the 
need for expanded opportunities to provide travel training for their clients. 
?  Agencies that currently utilize or are developing programs to utilize volunteers 
described the need for screening and training individuals who volunteer. Some 
stakeholders mentioned the need for proper identification of program volunteers 
through the use of ID badges, custom shirts or jackets, etc. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 113 
 
 
Eligibility System Needs 
Streamline eligibility process for all programs 
?  There was agreement among stakeholders that the process to apply for 
transportation services on Maui can be cumbersome and duplicative. Multiple 
registration forms are required to be submitted to multiple agencies (Maui Bus 
paratransit, MEO, Kaunoa Senior Center). Human service organizations 
indicated that efficient coordination of the eligibility process would be very useful, 
including a common database of clients across programs and service types. 
Overall, human service agencies offered that it was difficult to understand all the 
transportation options available to their clients and said that they would like to 
have ?one hoop to jump through for all services.?  
Human Services Coordination Needs 
Expand coordination between federally funded programs 
?  Throughout the discussions on Maui, service providers identified the need for 
more coordination between and across federally funded programs in order to 
expand transportation delivery to clients. In particular, coordination at the State 
and County level between FTA and Agency on Aging funds was mentioned. 
Increase assistance with FTA grant process 
?  Several stakeholders expressed the need for in-house or collective grant-writing 
assistance and services to improve their ability to be competitive for state and 
federal transportation and infrastructure funds. Agencies indicated that they did 
not have the staff, the time or the expertise to prepare grant applications. 
Policy/Planning Needs 
Some individuals stated that they and their clients needed to know what rights 
consumers have for transportation under the ADA and what responsibilities 
transportation providers such as MEO have to deliver services. 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 114 
 
All stakeholders indicated that the 5310 process is too slow and is limited to vehicle 
purchases only, thus limiting the effective usefulness of the funds. Other funding issues 
that were discussed include the use of Agency on Aging funds potentially being 
broadened to include services for disabled individuals. 
Prioritized Transportation Needs 
Public workshop participants were asked to select the three most important categories, 
and prioritize the needs within those categories. The top three categories chosen were 
Service/Assistance (44%), Training (39%), and Human Services Coordination (39%) 
needs. The prioritized list of mobility needs in these categories was reviewed by the 
Mobility Workgroup, which concurred with the prioritization of the Workshop 
participants. The priority needs were again reviewed via a survey distributed in 
November 2010 and at a final public meeting to review the draft plan on June 29, 2011. 
Some refinement was made to the various needs as described in more detail above. 
Service/Assistance Needs 
Affordability and service to outlying areas on Maui were easily the top ranked service 
and assistance needs. Figure 4-11 shows the full ranking of the needs in this category. 
Figure 4-11: Most Important Service/Assistance Needs 
 
 
0%  (0)  
7%  (1)  
14%  (2)  
21%  (3)  
21%  (3)  
29%  (4)  
36%  (5)  
64%  (9)  
71%  (10)  
Not all clients can ride MEO bus 
Door through door service 
Signage on buses/bus stops 
Information 
Quicker transportation 
Personal attendants for disabled riders 
Exceeded capacity (MEO) 
Service to outlying areas 
Affordability 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 115 
 
 
Training Needs 
Of the three needs identified in this category, 100% of the participants ranked driver 
training as the top need, as shown in Figure 4-12. In discussion, they emphasized that 
an accountability system should be included in this category, saying that drivers should 
be held accountable to follow the training.  
Figure 4-12: Most Important Training Needs 
 
Human Services Coordination Needs 
Coordinating federal funding programs and enhancing multimodal transportation to 
connect people living on each of the islands in the County of Maui tied for the top 
priority needs. Detailed results are displayed in Figure 4-13. Discussions following this 
public meeting found other coordination issues to be more significant than these. 
Figure 4-13: Most Important Human Services Coordination Needs 
 
0%  (0)  
0%  (0)  
100%  (14)  
Volunteer driver screening and ID 
Travel training 
Driver training 
0%  (0)  
29%  (4)  
36%  (5)  
57%  (8)  
57%  (8)  
Between counties 
Common database across programs/svc 
types 
Services in general/mobility management 
Coordinate fed funding programs  
Multimodal transportation (Lanai/Molokai) 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 116 
 
 
4D. Strategies for Improved Service and Coordination 
This section describes local strategies designed to address the mobility gaps identified 
during previous meetings on Maui. These strategies were initially developed by the 
consultant team based on interviews, public meetings, local mobility workgroup input, 
and past experience. During a local provider workshop held on December 8, 2010, the 
local Mobility Workgroup, comprised of transportation and social service providers, 
refined and prioritized these strategies. The participants of the Workgroup meeting are 
listed below. 
The strategies presented at the December Workshop were prioritized into four 
categories, A-D, with A being the top priority category. In order to prioritize the 
strategies, workshop participants reviewed each strategy in terms of: 
?  The number of critical needs that could be met;  
?  Its financial feasibility;  
?  Feasibility of implementation; and  
?  The involvement of coordination, partnerships and potential community support.  
Workshop participants were asked to rate strategies each for categories A-D. These 
decisions were made by consensus. The results of this process are described below, 
including brief descriptions of each strategy and the needs they are intended to 
address. Following is a description of the results of this process. 
 
Category A 
 
Strategy 
Description 
Need(s) Addressed 
HSTP Goals/ 
Objectives 
Addressed 
Lead agency 
for human 
service 
transportation 
coordination 
County of Maui 
should take the 
lead in Human 
Services 
Coordination with 
some level of 
centralized 
action 
 
? Human Services Agencies 
need assistance applying 
for federal grants 
? Development of 
standardized eligibility 
process across programs 
? Coordination of permanent 
eligibility across programs 
? Development of technology 
solutions to share data 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 3 
and 5 
?  Goal 4, 
Objective 5 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 117 
 
across programs 
Better 
coordination 
between Public 
Transit with 
Human 
Services 
Transportation 
 
This strategy 
involves the 
development of 
bus stops and/or 
transfer points 
between Maui 
Bus and Human 
Services 
agencies 
? Lack of bus 
stops/accessible bus stops 
? Insufficient service to 
outlying areas 
? Capacity issues 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 3 
and 5 
?  Goal 4, 
Objective 5 
Coordinated 
training 
This strategy 
involves 
coordinating 
periodic training 
for drivers and 
other personnel 
?  Coordination of Travel 
Training across agencies 
and programs 
?  Coordination of Driver 
Training across programs 
?  Goal 1, 
Objective 5
 
?  Goal 2, 
Objective 1
 
?  Goal 4, 
Objective 5 
 
Category B 
Strategy 
Description 
Need(s) Addressed 
HSTP Goals/ 
Objectives 
Addressed 
Coordinate 
planning 
efforts 
The role of 
Human Services 
Coordination 
needs to fit within 
other planning 
efforts 
? Human Services 
Coordination needs to 
be considered as a 
strategy for all transit 
plans 
? Goal 1, Objectives 
3 and 5 
Increased 
oversight 
County of Maui 
should increase 
its level of 
oversight of all 
County-funded 
transportation 
programs to 
ensure contract 
compliance. 
? Insufficient service 
? Capacity issues 
? Goal 1, Objective 5 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 118 
 
 
Category C 
Strategy 
Description 
Need(s) Addressed 
HSTP Goals/ 
Objectives Addressed 
Coordinate 
funding 
This strategy 
involves 
coordinating 
Federally Funded 
Programs to allow 
for service 
expansion, such 
as agency on 
Aging funds. 
? Insufficient service 
? Affordability 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 1 
and 5 
 
Increased 
public 
information 
This strategy 
involves 
establishing more 
types of public 
information, such 
as increasing 
public information 
regarding service 
options with a  
focus on ADA 
paratransit 
service for 
general disabled 
public, a single 
source for 
information on 
transportation 
options, and a 
coordinated 
marketing 
campaign for all 
people in need. 
? Development of 
information to inform 
and educate consumers 
and Human Services 
Agencies  
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2 
and 5 
?  Goal 4, 
Objective 5 
?  Goal 5, 
Objective 4 
 
 
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 119 
 
 
Category D 
Strategy 
Description 
Need(s) Addressed 
HSTP Goals/ 
Objectives 
Addressed 
Inter-Island 
coordination 
This strategy 
involves 
increasing the 
accessibility of 
transportation 
between islands 
within the county. 
?  Accessible transportation 
to/from and on Molokai 
and Lanai 
?  Goal 1, 
Objectives 2, 3 
and 5 
 
 
Public Comment on Strategies 
A public meeting was held in Kahului on June 29, 2011, with over 65 stakeholders 
attending. While all participants concurred with the presented strategies, some 
expressed a desire for ?things to move more quickly.?  Attendees also commented that 
the presentation was very informative about coordinated transportation programs. 
As in comment forms received through the Hawaii Rides website, many issues were 
discussed, such as the number and location of bus stops and the expansion of service 
through the addition of more service hours and greater coverage of outlying areas, and 
bus configuration, fall outside the scope of this coordinated transportation plan and 
could be addressed in a short range transit plan. 
Some additional strategies were identified: 
Establish regular public forums on transit accessibility issues
 
A local representative of Maui DOT be a visible, accessible part of the 
coordination process
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 120 
 
 
Chapter 5: Next Steps and Recommendations 
State and Local Action 
 
As discussed earlier in this Plan, projects funded through FTA programs Section 5310 
(Transportation for Elderly Persons and Persons with Disabilities); Section 5316 (Job 
Access and Reverse Commute) and Section 5317 (New Freedom) are required to be 
derived from a Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan. 
Throughout this planning process, transportation needs and gaps for low-income 
persons, older adults and persons with disabilities have been documented, and 
associated strategies identified at the local (county) level. It is also required, pursuant to 
guidance issued by FTA, that these strategies be prioritized; this exercise was 
completed in each of the three counties and the results are documented in Chapter 4.  
This chapter concludes the Plan, describing the statewide project selection process and 
offering consultant recommendations for next steps at the local level.
 
Statewide Project Selection Process 
A Statewide Mobility Workgroup was formed to review the local strategies and identify a 
process for reviewing future JARC and New Freedom funding applications.  Members of 
this workgroup include representatives of the City and County of Honolulu, Disability 
Communications and Access Board, Department of Human Services, Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation, and the Executive Office on Aging. Following are the results 
of their January 2011 meeting. 
Funding Principles 
The Statewide Mobility Workgroup recommended the following principles to guide the 
selection process:  
?  Consider geographic diversity. This means that an effort should be made to 
distribute projects among all the islands and to ensure there is some geographic 
balance when awarding projects. 
 
?  Honor local priorities. This means that the strategies identified as the highest 
priority at the local level should be honored when projects are evaluated.  Some 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 121 
 
weighting system may be developed in order to award projects that are 
consistent with the highest priorities.  
 
?  Fund variety of projects. This principle recognizes that a variety of projects, 
including operating support, capital procurement, planning and mobility 
management are needed and should be funded. 
Funding Priorities  
In addition to the general selection principles identified by the Statewide Mobility 
Workgroup, they also defined three statewide priority funding areas: 
?  Expand/Improve Service Operations. Projects that would use funding to provide 
new or expanded services (i.e. expanded service area, hours, or customer base) 
would be included in this category.  
 
?  Replace or Expand Vehicles/Other Capital Infrastructure. Projects that would 
allow for vehicle replacement, purchase of new vehicles, bus stop improvements, 
computer equipment or other capital improvements would be included in this 
category. 
  
?  Mobility Management. Projects that focus on coordination of services are 
considered mobility management, and a variety of activities could be funded, 
included coordinated training, development of service plans, implementation of 
pilot projects to promote vehicle sharing, coordinated information and referral, 
etc.  
HDOT and the Project Selection Committee will consider whether the project application 
is consistent with one or more of the above priorities.  
Evaluation Process Guidelines 
The Workgroup established the following guidelines for the evaluation process:  
?  Be transparent. Procedures for ranking and selecting projects will be defined 
ahead of time and be made available for potential project sponsors to review. 
Additionally, a rationale will be provided to support the ultimate funding decisions.  
 
?  Ensure no conflicts of interest exist. A process will be established that ensures 
there is no inherent conflict of interest among the committee. No member of the 
selection committee will represent an applicant or otherwise financially benefit 
from the projects awarded. This has not been a problem in the past, as HDOT 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 122 
 
has used the members of the Statewide Mobility Workgroup as described above, 
so no major changes or revisions should be needed. 
Applying for JARC and New Freedom Funds 
Applications will be made available on the HDOT website at 
http://hawaii.gov/dot/administration/stp/fta-grant
. HDOT staff will notify providers as they 
are made available, and they will provide information and support to applicants as 
needed and resources are available. 
Recommendations for State and Local Action 
Hawaii counties have been coordinating transportation for many years on informal and 
formal bases. This has been recognized as a necessary way of doing business in order 
to meet the mobility needs of their communities. As the economy struggles and 
populations grow older and more dependent on transit and human service 
transportation, coordination is even more important. 
Even with the existing coordination efforts, gaps in service still exist and additional 
strategies can be implemented to improve mobility for older adults, people with 
disabilities and low-income individuals. JARC and New Freedom funds, when leveraged 
by local funds, are available to meet some of these needs. However, available funds are 
limited
, so not all needs will be met even with these additional resources. It is important 
to be strategic in applying them, as described above in the Statewide Selection Process 
section. Local decision-making can be similarly strategic. 
Following are recommendations for next steps to be taken by local transportation and 
human service providers. 
?  Reconvene Local Mobility Workgroups. It is recommended that each county 
institutionalize their Local Mobility Workgroups in order to make on-going 
decisions about proposed projects. Transit agencies can be an excellent 
resource in taking the lead in launching this, given their historical leadership in 
transportation coordination in each of the counties. However, it is recommended 
that a rotating chair be selected for each workgroup. 
 
?  Develop Projects. It is recommended that the Local Mobility Workgroup review 
the top priority strategies and identify a short list of viable projects that can be 
implemented within the top priority strategies and available funds, based on 
whether it is a JARC or New Freedom project. A viable project will have an 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 123 
 
identified lead agency, partners, timeline for implementation, and local source for 
match funds.  
 
?  Apply for Federal Funds. Consider the statewide selection process described 
above when applying for funds. This is a competitive process, but it can also be a 
coordinated one.  It is recommended that counties communicate with each other 
about potential projects, selecting projects across the counties that achieve the 
state?s goals for dispersion of funds whenever possible. It would be beneficial for 
the state to facilitate this process. 
With the proper resources, the state can be a great asset in supporting on-going 
coordination efforts that meet identified and emerging needs over time. Following are 
recommendations for state action to support these local coordination efforts. 
?  Technical Support and Funding. It is recommended that HDOT provide 
leadership and technical assistance for the counties and their Local Mobility 
Workgroups. It is also recommended that HDOT lead efforts to coordinate with 
state agencies that fund human service transportation in order to attempt to 
overcome challenges to coordination that arise from different providers? funding 
requirement. Additional funding is needed in order to enable HDOT to provide 
this type of leadership and support for coordination. 
 
?  Needs Assessment Updates. Finally, it is recommended that needs assessments 
be reviewed and updated every few years. The state should help to identify and 
fund a mechanism to track unmet and emerging transportation needs on an on-
going basis. 
 
 
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 124 
 
Appendi
A:
 
Tr
ans
por
t
at
i
on 
Pr
ovi
der
 
I
nvent
or
y
 
 
 
C
o
u
n
ty
 
o
H
a
w
a
i
i
 
Fi
x
e
R
out
e
 
T
r
a
ns
por
t
a
t
i
on
 
AGE
NCY
 
Co
n
t
a
c
t
 
Ph
o
n
e
 
URL
 
Ad
d
r
e
s
s
 
Ag
e
n
c
y
 
Typ
e
 
Po
p
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
 
Se
r
ve
d
 
Al
l
o
wa
b
l
e
 
Tr
i
p
 
Typ
e
s
 
Fundi
ng
 
So
u
r
c
e
s
 
Fl
eet
 
Si
z
e
 
An
n
u
a
l
 
Bu
d
g
e
t
 
De
s
c
r
i
p
t
i
o
n
 
Co
u
n
t
y
 
o
f
 
Ha
wa
i
i
 
--
 
Ma
s
s
 T
r
a
n
s
it
 
Tom
 
B
r
ow
n,
 
A
dm
i
ni
s
t
r
at
or
 
961
-
8744
 
630 
E
.
 
Lani
k
aul
S
t
r
eet
,
 
Hi
l
o
,
 
HI
 
9
6
7
2
0
 
Pu
b
l
i
c
 
Ge
n
e
r
a
l
 
publ
i
c
 
Un
r
e
s
t
r
i
c
t
e
d
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
The 
H
aw
ai
i
 
C
ount
y
 
M
as
s
 
Tr
ans
i
t
 
A
genc
y
 
pr
ov
i
des
 
publ
i
c
 
t
r
ans
por
t
at
i
on 
ar
ound 
t
he 
i
s
l
and 
on 
t
he 
H
el
e
-
On
 
b
u
s
.
 
 
!
De
m
a
n
d
 
Re
s
p
o
n
s
e
 
T
r
a
n
s
p
o
r
t
a
t
i
o
n
 
AGE
NCY
 
Co
n
t
a
c
t
 
Ph
o
n
e
 
URL
 
Ad
d
r
e
s
s
 
Ag
e
n
c
y
 
Typ
e
 
Po
p
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
 
Se
r
ve
d
 
Al
l
o
wa
b
l
e
 
Tr
i
p
 
Typ
e
s
 
Fundi
ng
 
So
u
r
c
e
s
 
Fl
eet
 
Si
z
e
 
An
n
u
a
l
 
Bu
d
g
e
t
 
De
s
c
r
i
p
t
i
o
n
 
Co
u
n
t
y
 
o
f
 
Ha
wa
i
i
 
--
 
Ma
s
s
 
T
r
a
n
s
i
t
 
Tom
 
Br
o
w
n
,
 
Ad
m
i
n
i
s
t
r
a
t
o
r
 
961
-
8744
 
630 
E
.
 
Lani
k
aul
S
t
r
eet
,
 
Hi
l
o
,
 
HI
 
9
6
7
2
0
 
Pu
b
l
i
c
 
Ge
n
e
r
a
l
 
publ
i
c
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
The 
H
aw
ai
i
 
C
ount
y
 
M
as
s
 
Tr
ans
i
t
 
A
genc
y
 
pr
ov
i
des
 
publ
i
c
 
t
r
ans
por
t
a
tio
n
 a
r
o
u
n
d
 th
e
 is
la
n
d
 o
n
 th
e
 H
e
le
-
On
 
b
u
s
.
 
I
n
 
a
d
d
i
t
i
o
n
,
 
t
h
e
 
T
r
a
n
s
i
t
 
A
g
e
n
c
y
 
o
f
f
e
r
s
 
a
 
Sh
a
r
e
d
 
R
i
d
e
 
T
a
x
i
 
p
r
o
g
r
a
m
 
w
h
i
c
h
 
p
r
o
v
i
d
e
s
 
d
o
o
r
 
t
o
 
door
 
t
r
ans
por
t
at
i
on 
f
or
 
$2.
00 
w
i
t
hi
an 
11 
m
i
l
ra
d
i
u
s
 
o
f
 
H
i
l
o
.
 
Ha
wa
i
i
 
Co
u
n
t
y
 
Ec
o
n
o
m
i
c
 
O
p
p
o
r
t
u
n
i
t
y
 
Co
u
n
c
i
l
 
Les
t
er
 
S
et
o
 
961
-
2681
 
47 
R
ai
nbow
 
D
r
i
ve 
,
 
H
i
l
o,
 
HI
 
9
6
7
2
0
 
 
No
n
-
pr
of
i
t
 
Al
l
 
popul
at
i
ons
 
ar
s
er
ved 
vi
var
i
et
of
 
pr
ogr
am
s
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
Co
u
n
t
y
 
o
f
 
Ha
wa
i
i
 
M
a
s
s
 
Tr
ans
i
t
,
 
O
f
f
i
c
of
 
A
gi
ng,
 
and 
Pa
r
k
s
 
a
n
d
 
Re
c
r
e
a
t
i
o
n
;
 
 
He
a
d
s
t
a
r
t
,
 
Me
d
i
c
a
i
d
,
 a
n
d
 
AR
R
f
u
n
d
s
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
The 
H
aw
ai
i
 
C
ount
y
 
E
c
onom
i
c
 
O
ppor
t
uni
t
y
 
C
ounc
i
l
 
(H
C
E
O
C
i
s
 
a
 
p
ri
v
a
t
e
 
n
o
n
-
pr
of
i
t
,
 
and 
one 
of
 
t
he 
pr
i
m
ar
s
pec
i
al
 
needs
 
t
r
ans
por
t
at
i
on 
pr
ovi
der
s
 
on 
th
e
 B
ig
 Is
la
n
d
.  T
h
e
y
 s
e
r
v
e
 e
v
e
r
y
 s
e
g
m
e
n
t o
f th
e
 
popul
at
i
on 
t
hr
ough 
one 
o
m
o
re
 
o
f
 
t
h
e
i
pr
ogr
am
m
at
i
c
 
ef
f
or
t
s
.
 
 
The 
bul
k
 
of
 
t
hei
r
 
tr
a
n
s
p
o
r
ta
tio
n
 c
u
r
b
-
to
-
cu
r
b
 
se
r
v
i
ce
a
r
e
 
f
o
cu
se
d
 
o
n
 
lo
w
 in
c
o
m
e
, e
ld
e
r
ly
 a
n
d
 d
is
a
b
le
d
 p
e
r
s
o
n
s
, w
ith
 
ma
n
y
 
o
f
 
t
h
e
s
e
 
p
a
r
t
i
a
l
l
y
 
f
u
n
d
e
d
 
v
i
a
 
f
e
e
-
fo
r
-
se
r
v
i
ce
.
 
 
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 125 
 
!
Co
u
n
t
y
 
o
f
 
Ha
wa
i
i
 
--
 
El
d
e
r
l
y
 
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
 
Di
v
i
s
i
o
n
 
Ha
r
o
l
d
 
B
u
g
a
d
o
,
 
Di
r
e
c
t
o
r
 
961
-
8708
 
127 
K
am
ana 
S
t
.
 
,
 
H
i
l
o,
 
H
I
 
96720 
 
Pu
b
l
i
c
 
Ol
d
e
r
 
adul
t
s
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
The 
agenc
y
 
pr
ov
i
des
 
s
er
v
i
c
es
 
t
i
ndi
v
i
dual
s
 
60 
year
s
 
and 
ol
de
r,
 
w
i
t
h
 
i
n
f
o
rm
a
t
i
o
n
 
a
n
d
 
re
f
e
rra
l
 
se
r
v
i
ce
a
b
o
u
t
 
t
h
e
 
v
i
t
a
l
 
se
r
v
i
ce
a
n
d
 
b
e
n
e
f
i
t
avai
l
abl
i
H
aw
ai
`
i
 
C
ount
y.
 
Ho
s
p
i
c
e
 
o
f
 
Hi
l
o
 
Pe
a
r
l
 
L
y
m
a
n
 
 
C
o
o
r
d
i
n
a
t
o
r
 
of
 
V
ol
unt
eer
 
S
er
vi
c
es
 
969
-
1733
 
No
n
-
pr
of
i
t
 
Ter
m
i
nal
l
y
 
ill
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
Ho
s
p
i
c
e
 
o
f
 
Hi
l
o
 
o
f
f
e
r
s
 
a
 
r
a
n
g
e
 
o
f
 
s
u
p
p
o
r
t
 
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
 
t
o
 
te
r
m
in
a
lly
 ill p
a
tie
n
ts
 a
n
d
 th
e
ir
 fa
m
ilie
s
.
 
!
Vo
l
u
n
t
e
e
r
 
T
r
a
n
s
p
o
r
t
a
t
i
o
n
 
AGE
NCY
 
Co
n
t
a
c
t
 
Ph
o
n
e
 
URL
 
Ad
d
r
e
s
s
 
Ag
e
n
c
y
 
Typ
e
 
Po
p
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
 
Se
r
ve
d
 
Al
l
o
wa
b
l
e
 
Tr
i
p
 
Typ
e
s
 
Fundi
ng
 
So
u
r
c
e
s
 
Fl
eet
 
Si
z
e
 
An
n
u
a
l
 
Bu
d
g
e
t
 
De
s
c
r
i
p
t
i
o
n
 
Ho
s
p
i
c
e
 
o
f
 
Hi
l
o
 
Pe
a
r
l
 
L
y
m
a
n
 
 
Co
o
r
d
i
n
a
t
o
r
 
o
f
 
V
o
l
u
n
t
e
e
r
 
Se
r
v
i
c
e
s
 
969
-
1733
 
No
n
-
pr
of
i
t
 
Ter
m
i
nal
l
y
 
ill
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
Ho
s
p
i
c
e
 
o
f
 
Hi
l
o
 
o
f
f
e
r
s
 
a
 
r
a
n
g
e
 
o
f
 
s
u
p
p
o
r
t
 
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
 
t
o
 
te
r
m
in
a
lly
 ill p
a
tie
n
ts
 a
n
d
 th
e
ir
 fa
m
ilie
s
.
 
!
Pr
o
g
r
a
m
 
T
r
a
n
s
p
o
r
t
a
t
i
o
n
 
AGE
NCY
 
Co
n
t
a
c
t
 
Ph
o
n
e
 
URL
 
Ad
d
r
e
s
s
 
Ag
e
n
c
y
 
Typ
e
 
Po
p
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
 
Se
r
ve
d
 
Al
l
o
wa
b
l
e
 
Tr
i
p
 
Typ
e
s
 
Fundi
ng
 
So
u
r
c
e
s
 
Fl
eet
 
Si
z
e
 
An
n
u
a
l
 
Bu
d
g
e
t
 
De
s
c
r
i
p
t
i
o
n
 
Br
a
n
t
l
e
y
 
Ce
n
t
e
r
 
St
e
v
e
 
Pa
v
a
o
 
775
-
7245
 
PO
 
Bo
x
 
1
4
0
7
,
 
H
o
n
o
k
a
?
a
,
 
HI
 
9
6
7
2
7
 
No
n
-
pr
of
i
t
 
Ol
d
e
r
 
t
e
e
n
s
 
and 
adul
t
s
 
wi
t
h
 
m
e
n
t
a
l
 
and 
phys
i
c
al
 
di
s
abi
l
i
t
i
es
 
Pr
o
g
r
a
m
 
onl
y
 
Gr
a
n
t
s
 
a
n
d
 
se
r
v
i
ce
 
f
e
e
s
 
vehi
c
l
es
--
12 
ps
gr
 
van 
w/
l
i
f
t
--
mi
n
i
v
a
n
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
The 
B
r
ant
l
ey
 
C
ent
er
,
 
I
nc
.
 
i
s
 
pr
i
v
at
non
-
pr
of
i
t
,
 
devot
ed 
t
w
or
k
i
ng 
w
i
t
peopl
w
i
t
phys
i
c
al
 
and 
me
n
t
a
l
 
d
i
s
a
b
i
l
i
t
i
e
s
.
 
 
T
h
e
 
a
g
e
n
c
y
 
p
r
o
v
i
d
e
s
 
t
r
a
i
n
i
n
g
 
pr
ogr
am
s
 
f
oc
us
ed 
on 
enc
our
agi
ng 
i
ndependenc
i
th
e
 h
o
m
e
, w
o
r
k
p
la
c
e
, a
n
d
 c
o
m
m
u
n
i
ty
.  T
h
e
 
em
pl
oym
ent
 
r
ehabi
l
i
t
at
i
on 
pr
ogr
am
 
of
f
er
s
 
s
t
udent
s
 
wi
t
h
 
d
i
s
a
b
i
l
i
t
i
e
s
 
t
h
e
 
o
p
p
o
r
t
u
n
i
t
y
 
t
o
 
t
r
a
n
s
i
t
i
o
n
 
f
r
o
m
 
sch
o
o
l
 
t
o
 
t
h
e
 
w
o
r
e
n
v
i
r
o
n
m
e
n
t
 
d
u
r
i
n
g
 
t
h
e
i
r
 
se
n
i
o
r
 
year
.
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 126 
 
!
Co
u
n
t
y
 
o
f
 
Ha
wa
i
i
 
--
 
El
d
e
r
l
y
 
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
 
D
i
v
i
s
i
o
n
 
Ha
r
o
l
d
 
B
u
g
a
d
o
,
 
Di
r
e
c
t
o
r
 
961
-
8708
 
127 
K
am
ana 
S
t
.
 
,
 
H
i
l
o,
 
H
I
 
96720 
 
Pu
b
l
i
c
 
Ol
d
e
r
 
a
d
u
l
t
s
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
The 
agenc
y
 
pr
ov
i
des
 
s
er
v
i
c
es
 
t
i
ndi
v
i
dual
s
 
60 
year
s
 
and 
ol
der
.
 
Ha
wa
i
i
 
I
s
l
a
n
d
 
Ad
u
l
t
 
Ca
r
e
,
 
In
c
.
 
Pa
u
l
a
 
Uu
s
i
t
a
l
o
,
 
E
x
e
c
u
t
i
v
e
 
Di
r
e
c
t
o
r
 
961
-
3747
 
No
n
-
pr
of
i
t
 
Ol
d
e
r
 
a
d
u
l
t
s
 
Pr
o
g
r
a
m
-
re
l
a
t
e
d
 
Me
d
i
c
a
i
d
,
 
tu
itio
n
fa
r
e
b
o
x
 
w
heel
c
hai
r
 
equi
pped 
pas
s
enger
 
vans
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
HI
A
s
e
r
v
e
s
 
o
l
d
e
r
 
a
d
u
l
t
s
 
a
n
d
 
p
e
o
p
l
e
 
wi
t
h
 
p
h
y
s
i
c
a
l
 
di
s
abi
l
i
t
i
es
.
 
 
A
t
 
pr
es
ent
,
 
t
her
ar
89
 c
lie
n
ts
, a
n
d
 
about
 
60 
peopl
per
 
day 
c
om
t
t
he 
c
ent
er
 
f
or
 
me
a
l
 
p
r
o
g
r
a
o
r
 
o
t
h
e
r
 
a
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
.
 
 
H
I
A
C
'
s
 
p
u
r
p
o
s
e
 
i
s
 
to
 p
r
o
v
id
e
 c
o
m
m
u
n
ity
 b
a
s
e
d
 c
a
r
e
 fo
r
 th
e
 d
a
ily
 life
 
needs
 
of
 
f
r
ai
l
 
el
der
s
,
 
A
l
z
hei
m
er
'
s
 
pat
i
ent
s
,
 
and 
phys
i
c
al
l
or
 
m
ent
al
l
c
hal
l
enged 
i
ndi
vi
dual
s
,
 
t
hus
 
gi
vi
ng 
t
hem
 
t
he 
oppor
t
uni
t
t
r
em
ai
l
i
vi
ng 
i
t
hei
r
 
ow
hom
es
.
 
Ha
wa
i
i
 
Ce
n
t
e
r
s
 
f
o
r
 
In
d
e
p
e
n
d
e
n
t
 L
iv
in
g
 
?
 H
ilo
 
Ra
e
l
e
n
e
 
S
o
u
z
a
 
935
-
3777
 
1055 
K
i
nool
S
t
r
eet
,
 
S
t
e.
 
105 
,
 
H
i
l
o,
 
H
I
 
96720 
 
No
n
-
pr
of
i
t
 
Pe
r
s
o
n
s
 
w
i
t
h
 
phys
i
c
al
 
and 
me
n
t
a
l
 
di
s
abi
l
i
t
i
es
 
Pr
o
g
r
a
m
-
re
l
a
t
e
d
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
The 
i
ndependent
 
l
i
v
i
ng 
pr
ogr
am
 
i
s
 d
e
s
ig
n
e
d
 to
 h
e
lp
 
th
o
s
e
 s
e
r
v
e
d
 to
 liv
e
 i
ndependent
l
i
t
he 
c
om
m
uni
t
b
pr
ovi
di
ng 
s
er
vi
c
es
 
and 
i
nf
or
m
at
i
on 
t
c
ons
um
er
s
 
in
 r
e
g
a
r
d
s
 
to
 h
o
u
s
in
g
, th
e
 h
ir
in
g
 o
f p
e
r
s
o
n
a
as
s
i
s
t
ant
s
,
 
and 
gai
ni
ng 
i
ndependent
 
l
i
vi
ng 
s
k
i
l
l
s
,
 
al
l
ow
i
ng 
c
ons
um
er
s
 
t
exer
c
i
s
per
s
onal
 
c
hoi
c
and 
dec
i
s
i
on 
m
ak
i
ng 
and 
bec
om
bet
t
er
 
advoc
at
es
 
f
or
 
th
e
m
s
e
lv
e
s
.
 
Ko
n
a
 
Ad
u
l
t
 
Da
y
 
Ce
n
t
e
r
,
 
In
c
.
 
Ro
we
n
a
 
T
i
q
u
i
,
 
 
E
x
e
c
u
t
i
v
e
 
Di
r
e
c
to
r
 
322
-
7977
 
P.
O
.
 
Bo
x
 
1
3
6
0
,
 
Ke
a
l
a
k
e
k
u
a
,
 
H
I
 
9
6
7
5
0
 
No
n
-
pr
of
i
t
 
Ol
d
e
r
 
a
d
u
l
t
s
 
wi
t
h
 
p
h
y
s
i
c
a
l
 
and 
m
ent
al
 
di
s
abi
l
i
t
i
es
 
Pr
o
g
r
a
m
-
re
l
a
t
e
d
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
vans
,
 
wi
t
h
 
a
 
wh
e
e
l
c
h
a
i
r
 
lift
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
The 
agenc
y
 
pr
ov
i
des
 
day
 
s
er
v
i
c
ac
t
i
v
i
t
i
es
 
f
or
 a
d
u
lts
 
wi
t
h
 
p
h
y
s
i
c
a
l
 
a
n
d
 
m
e
n
t
a
l
 
d
i
s
a
b
i
l
i
t
i
e
s
.
 
The 
A
r
of
 
K
ona
 
Ma
g
g
i
e
 
L
o
b
o
,
 
 
D
i
r
e
c
t
o
r
 
o
f
 
Op
e
r
a
t
i
o
n
s
 
323
-
2626
 
81
-
1065 
K
onaw
aena 
Sc
h
o
o
l
 
R
o
a
d
,
 
Ke
a
l
a
k
e
k
u
a
,
 
HI
 
9
6
7
5
0
 
No
n
-
pr
of
i
t
 
Pe
r
s
o
n
s
 
w
i
t
h
 
phys
i
c
al
 
and 
me
n
t
a
l
 
di
s
abi
l
i
t
i
es
 
Pr
o
g
r
a
m
-
re
l
a
t
e
d
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
 
not
 
pr
ovi
ded
 
The 
A
r
c
 
of
 
K
ona 
i
s
 
pr
i
v
at
nonpr
of
i
t
 
or
gani
z
at
i
on 
fo
r
 p
e
r
s
o
n
s
 w
ith
 d
is
a
b
ilitie
s
, th
e
ir
 a
d
v
o
c
a
te
s
 a
n
d
 
fa
m
ilie
s
. T
h
e
 A
r
c
 o
f K
o
n
a
 is
 c
o
m
m
itte
d
 to
 h
e
lp
in
g
 
per
s
ons
 
w
i
t
di
s
abi
l
i
t
i
es
 
ac
hi
eve 
t
he 
f
ul
l
es
t
 
pos
s
i
bl
in
d
e
p
e
n
d
e
n
c
e
 a
n
d
 p
a
r
tic
ip
a
tio
n
 in
 o
u
r
 s
o
c
ie
ty
 
ac
c
or
di
ng 
t
t
hei
r
 
w
i
s
hes
.
 
background image
 
P a g e
 | 127 
 
!
The 
A
r
of
 
H
i
l
o
 
Vi
c
k
i
 
L
i
n
t
e
r
,
 
C
o
m
m
u
n
i
t
y
 
Su
p
p
o
r
t
 
Se
r
v
i
c
e
s
 
Ma
n
a
g
e
r
 
935
-
8534
 
1099 
W
ai
!
nuenue 
A
ve.
,
 
Hi
l
o
,
 
HI
 
9
6
7
2
0
 
 
 
No